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Government 
Publications 



37, 

SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



VOLUME XII.-PART II, 



FIRST SESSION OF THE FOURTH LEGISLATURE 



OF THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 



,es3ton 



Volume XII. 




109132 



o ♦^ 



TOKONTO : 

PRINTED BY C. BLACKETT ROBINSON. 
JORDAN STREET. 



TORONTO : 

BOUND BY WILLIAM WARWICK, 

WELLINGTON STREET. 



43 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1880. 



LIST or SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



VOL. IS, SESSION 1880. 



ARRANGED ALPHABETICALLY. 




Agriculture 

Agriculture and Arts . 

Agricultural Farm 

Art and Design, School of 

Asylums 

Births, Deaths and Marriages .... 

Bonds and Securities of Office 

Boundary Line 

Cardwell License Commissioner . . 

Central Prison 

Collectors' Rolls 

Commissions of Inquiry 

County Councils 

County Courts 

Crown Lands 

Division Courts * 

Dufferin, License Act in 

Education 

Elections 

Estimates 

Hamilton & North -Western R'y • 

Hospitals and Charities 

Immigration 

Insurance Companies 

Irving, William 

Juries 

Land Improvement Fund 

Legislative Buildings 

Lennox and Addington 

Library 



3 

30,66 

1-6 

31,50 

8 

9 

10 

46 

27 

48,62 

70 

67 

33,65 

43 

4 

20 

24 

5 

19 

2 

73 

64 

6,54 

21,57 

32 

55 

26 

52 

36 

12 



London H^ospital 

Lunatics 

Melancthon, Temperance Act in . . . 

Mercer Estate 

Middlesex Licenses 

Mimico Farm 

Municipal Elections 

Municipal Loan Fund 

Municipal Statistics 

Niagara Falls Territory . 

Northerly and Westerly Boundaries 
Peterborough, Temperance Act in . . 

Practical Science, School of 

Prisoners 

Public Accounts 

Public Works 

Railways 

Registrars 

Schools 

Sheriffs 

Small, John 

Statutes of Ontario 

Surrogate Courts 

Timber Dues 

University College 

University of Toronto 



Upper Canada College , 



11,41, 
44,71 

42 

35 

23 

34 

28 

40 

53 

38 

58 

51 

22 

25 

13 

39 

1 

7 

37,56 

14 

61 

72 

68 

15 

47 
49,69 
29,45 
17,60 

63 
18,59 



43 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1880 



SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



ARRANGED NUMERICALLY. 



CONTENTS OF PART I. 
No. 1 . . Public Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1879. 
No. 2. . Estimates for the year 1880. 
No. 3. . Report of the Commissioner of Agriculture and Arts for the year 1879. 

CONTENTS OF PART II. 

No. 4. . i Report of the Commissioner of Crown Lands for the year 1879. 

No. . . Report of the Minister of Education on the Public, Separate and High Schools ; 
also, on the Normal and Model Schools for the year 1878. 

No. 6 . . Report of the Immigration Department for the year 1879. 

No. 7 . . Report of the Commissioner of Public Works for the year ending 31st 
December, 1879. 

No. 8 . . The Report of the Inspector of Asylums, Prisons and Public Charities for 
the year ending 30th September, 1879. 

CONTENTS OF PART III. 

No. 9 . . P^eturn relating to Births, Deaths and Marriages for 1879. 

No. 10.. Detailed Statement of all Bonds and Securities registered in the ProA'incial 
Registrar's Office since last Return, made in accordance with the Revised 
Statutes of Ontario, cap. 15, sec. 23. (JS^ot Printed.) 

No. 11.. Report on the working of the Tavern and Shop Licenses Act for the year 1879. 

No. 12.. Report from the Librarian on the state of the Legislative Library. 

No. 13. . Report of the School of Practical Science for the year 1879 ; also, copy of 
the amended Prospectus, with a syllabus of the courses of Instruction and 
of the Regulations for Diplomas of the School. 

No. 14. . Returns of all fees and emoluments received by the Registrars of Ontario for 
the year 1879, made in accordance with the provisions of section 97 of 
cap. 3, R. S. O. 

No. 15 . . Statement of Queen's Printer as to the disposal of Ontario Statutes for 1879. 
(Not Printed.) 

No. 16. . Report of the School of Agriculture and Experimental Farm for 1879. 



43 Yictoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1880 



No. 17. 

No. 18. 
No. 19. 



No. 20, 
No. 21. 
No. 22, 

No. 23, 



No. 24, 



No. 25, 



No. 26, 



No. 27, 



The Bursar's Statement of the University of Toronto, for the year ending 
30th of June, 1879. 

Statement of Receipts and Disbursements on account of the Capital Account 
of Upper Canada College for the year ending 30th June, 1879. 

Return from the Records of the Elections to the Legislative Assembly, shelving 
the aggregate number of Votes polled for each Candidate in each Electoral 
District in which there has been a contest, the total number polled in each 
Division, and the number of names on the Voter's Lists of the same respect- 
ively, and the population of each Constituency, as shewn by the last 
census ; also, Supplementary Return, shewing : — 1. The majority whereby 
each successful candidate was returned ; 2. The number of votes remaining 
unpolled in each Electoral District in which there was a contest, as shewn 
by the names on the Voters' Lists thereof ; 3. Similar particulars to those 
furnished by the Return, and the Supplementary Return, as to any Elec- 
tions holden before its being brought down, as the result of the unseating 
of Members by the Election Court. 

CONTENTS OF PART IV. 

The Report of the Inspector of Division Courts for the year 1878. 

Report of the Inspector of Insurance for the year 1879. 

Reports of the Stipendiary Magistrates with respect to the Northerly and 
Westerly parts of the Province of Ontario. 

Return shewing all moneys received, and from whom, on account of fines and 
costs in respect of convictions under the Temperance Act of 1864, in the 
Township of Melancthon, in the Electoral District of DufFerin durino- the 
year 1878 ; also, the expense of convictions, and to whom paid, and the 
amount paid the Commissioners or the Inspector, in respect of service or 
expense during the year. {Not Printed.) 

Return shewing the total amount of Tavern and Shop Licenses granted to 
each of the Municipalities of the Electoral District of DufFerin, in the year 
1878 ; also, total amount of moneys received from each of the said Munici- 
palities, total amount received for fines ; total amount deposited in banks ; 
amount paid to Treasurer of each Municipality ; expenses of Commissioners 
and Inspectors' salaries or fees ; balance remaining, if any, to the credit of 
the Licen.se Fund for said Electoral District. {Not Printed.) 

Return shewing all moneys received, and from whom, on account of fines 
and costs, in re.spect of convictions under the Temperance Act of 1864, in 
the West Riding of Peterborough, during the year 1878; also, the 
expenses in connection with the same, and to whom paid, and the amounts 
paid to Commissioners or to the Inspector, in respect of services or 
expenses during such year. {Not Printed.) 

Return shewing the amounts received in the Crown Lands Department, on 
account of the Land Improvement Fund from 1861, when its payment to 
the Municipalities ceased, up till the 1st of July, 1867, from which date it 
has been paid till now. 

Return relating to Liquor Licenses in the Electoral District of Cardwell. 
{Not Printed.) 



43 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1880 



No. 28, 



No. 29. 
No. 30. 

No. 31. 
No. 32. 

No. 33. 

No. 34. 
No. 35. 

No. 36. 

No. 37, 
No. 38, 



No. 39 



Return shewing total number of Tavern Licenses granted to each Munici- 
pality of the West Riding of Middlesex in the year 1878 ; also, total 
number of Shop Licenses ; total amount of money received from each of 
the said Municipalities for such licenses ; total amount received for fines ; 
total amount deposited in banks ; date of deposit ; where, and by whom 
deposited ; amounts and dates of payments to Treasurer of each Munici- 
pality ; expenses of Commissioners and In.spectors, salary or fees ; balance, 
if any, remaining to credit License Fund of the West Riding of 
Middlesex. (jVot Printed.) 

Report of the Council of L^niversity College, Toronto, for 1879. (xVoi Printed.) 

Return from the Treasurer of the Agriculture and Arts Association, giving a 
detailed statement of its income and expenditure for the years 1878 and 
1879. {Xot Printed.) 

Report of the Ontario School of Art and Design for the year 1879. {Not 
Printed.) 

Return of coj^ies of all correspondence and papers between the Department 
of Public Works and William Irving, in respect to his claim for work 
done on certain drains in the Township of Raleigh, under the Drainage 
Act. {Not Printed.) 

Return shewing: — 1. The number of Reeves and Deputies comprising the 
several County Councils of this Province, in the years 1868 and 1879 
respectively ; 2. The number of sessions held, with duration of each. 

Statement of Receipts, Expenditures and Assets of the Mercer Estate for the 
year 1879. 

Return of the number of Lunatics who were confined in the several common 
gaols of this Province in the years 1871, 1874 and 1878, and the aggregate 
number of days during which Lunatics were so confined in these years. 
(Not Printed.) 

Report of the Commission appointed by the Government to investigate into 
the financial afiairs of the United Counties of Lennox and Addington, 
together with the e'^'idence taken at said investigation by such Commission. 
(Not Printed.) 

Return of correspondence and papers relating to the following Railways : — 
Erie and Huron Railway ; Georgian Bay and Wellington Railway ; and 
the Stratford and Huron Railway. 

Return of the Municipal Loan Fund Debentures still in the hands of the Pro- 
vincial Treasurer unsold, shewing the amount of the Debentures of each 
Municipality so held ; the date when issued ; the interest accrued upon 
the same : the interest paid ; and the date when paid, and the amount of 
interest still in arrears on 31.st December last; also, if any sales of Muni- 
cipal Loan Fund Debentures have been made during the years 1877, 1878 
and 1879, giving the date of such sale, the name of the Municipality 
whose Debentures were sold, and the price realized for the same. 

Return shewing the number of prisoners sent from each County in Ontario to 
the Kingston Penitentiary, Reformatory and Asylums, during the years 
1878 and 1879, and also stating in detail the fees received by the Sherifis 
of the Counties respectively for their services in connection therewith. 



43 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1880 



No. 40, 



No. 41. 

No. 42. 

No. 43. 

No. 44. 



No. 45, 



No. 46. 



No. 47, 



No. 48. 



No. 49 



Statement shewing the original cost of lands known as Mimico Farm ; the 
number of acres sold, and the amounts realized therefor ; also, shewing 
the number of acres remaining unsold ; the number and names of the 
tenants or lessees thereof, or any pai't thereof ; the number of acres held 
by each such tenant or lessee ; the respective rentals agreed to be paid by 
each such tenant or lessee ; the amounts paid, and the terms and conditions 
of the lease or tenancy of such tenant or lessee. 

Return of all Departmental Orders or instructions to License Commissioners 
and Inspectors, with a view to furnishing to the Municipalities details of 
expenditure of License Fund. (Not Printed.) 

Return of all correspondence and papers between the Government and the 
County of Middlesex, relating to the support of patients in the Loudon 
Asylum. (Not Printed.) 

Return shewing all cases in the County Courts which have been argued and 
been adjourned for judgment in the year 1878. (Not Printed.) 

Return for the years 1877, 1878 and 1879, shewing for each License District 
in the Province the number of convictions under the Act respecting the 
sale of fermented and spirituous liquors, for (1), selling without license; 
and (2), selling on Sunday or after seven o'clock on Saturday night, or 
during any other days or hours contrary to any Statute in force in the 
Province or any By-law in force in any of such Districts, shewing also how 
many of the latter class have, subsequent to conviction, been re-licensed. 

Return of the regular students ; also, of occasional students admitted at 
University College, Toronto, during the years 1875, 1876, 1877, 1878 and 
1879, distinguishing the males from the females; the number of such 
regular and occasional students who actually attended the College during 
those years, and the number who matriculated in the Toronto University ; 
the respective salaries of professors, tutors, and others in receipt of moneys 
from the College funds ; the total amount of the annual income of said 
College, and of the annual charges upon the same. {Not Printed.) 

Return of papers or correspondence which may have passed between the Gov- 
ernment of the Province and that of the Dominion, in regard to the con- 
firmation of the Award of the Arbitrators, in reference to the North- 
western Boundaries of the Province. 

Return shewing the aggregate fees received by each Judge of the County 
Court in this Province, in connection with his duties as Judge of the Sur- 
rogate Court, for the years 1878 and 1879. 

Return shewing the number of prisoners flogged in the Central Prison 
during the years 1878 and 1879, up to the present date ; by whom so sen- 
tenced, if any were ; whether by the Judges or by the Warden of the 
Prison, and for what oflfence ; together with a copy of the by-laws and 
Orders in Council under which corporal punishments are administered. 

Return shewing : 1. The names of the persons, firms and companies in- 
debted to the Crown on the 1st day of January, 1879, on account of timber 
dues, ground rent, or bonuses for timber limits ; 2. The amount of indebt- 
edness in each case ; 3. The balance, if any, due by such persons, firms and 
companies on the first day of January in each of the years since 1871 ; 4. 
The nature of the security, if any, which the Province holds in each case for 
the balance due ; 5. The estimated value of each such security. [Not Printed.) 



43 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1880 



No. 50. 



No. 51 



No. 52, 



No. 53. 



No. 54, 



No. 55, 



No. 56, 



No. 57. 

No. 58. 
No. 59, 

No. 60. 

No. 61, 



Report of the Board of Management of the Western Ontario School of Art 
since its organization in April, 1879. {Not Printed.) 

Report respecting recent proceedings in reference to the Niagara Falls and 
adjacent territory. 

Report of the Architect of the Department of Public Works and other papers 
in relation to Pai^iament and Departmental Buildings. 

Return of the expenses incurred by the several Municipalities of Ontario in 
holding the Municipal Elections for the years 1874 and 1879 ; also, of the 
allowances paid during the year 1878 by each county and township council 
in Ontario, to the members of their councils ; also, cost of printing ballot 
papers, and erecting ballot compartments in 1878. 

Return for the year 1879, shewing: — 1. The number of emigrant free passes 
given by the Ontario Agent at Quebec from that port to points of destin- 
ation in Ontario, and the points of destination ; also, the names of the 
boats, and by whom owned, in which such emigrants arrived at Quebec ; 
2. The number of emigi-ant free passes refused by the Ontario Agent at 
Quebec ; the grounds of such refusal ; the name of boat, and by whom 
owned, by which such emigrants arrived at Quebec ; 3. The number of 
tenant farmers with capital, and the supposed amount thereof, arriving 
and settling within the Province in 1879. 

Return shewing the cost of Grand Juries for the years 1876 and 1877, re- 
spectively, in each of the Counties in Ontario. 

Return of all Railways receiving aid from Provincial Funds since 1870 ; the 
route of each ; the mileage completed ; the aid received per mile ; dis- 
tinguishing subsidy from direct payment ; Statute or Statutes authorizing 
these payments ; the total direct payments made ; the total half-yearly 
payments made ; number of certificates paid ; number unpaid ; total pay- 
ments due annually on account of certificates issued ; also, a Return of all 
Railways for aiding which Orders in Council or Acts have been passed, 
and which have not yet received aid, and the amount of the aid to, and 
the mileage of such railways. 

Return of all Insurance Companies which have not made their Returns to 
Government of the business of the year 1879, as provided by cap. 160, 
sec. 26, and cap. 161, sec. 76, R. S. O. 

Municipal Statistics of Ontario for 1878. 

Return respecting Upper Canada College, shewing the nature of the invest- 
ments made on account of the endowment of the College, as on the 30th 
day of June. 1879. 

Return respecting University of Toronto, shewing the nature of the invest- 
ments made on account of the endowment of the University, as on the 
30th day of June, 1879. 

Return giving the names of the Municipalities which have adopted Township 
Boards of Public School Trustees; the date of their establishment, and 
any con-espondence in connection therewith. 



43 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1880 



No. 62 . . Return stating in detail the name, and cost of conveying each lunatic to 
the diflerent Asylums, prisoners to the Central Prison, boys to the Refor- 
matory, for the years 1874, 1875, 1876, 1877 and 1878. [Not Printed.) 

No. 63 . . Return containing tlie minutes of all meetings of the Senate of the Univei-- 
sity of Toronto during the year 1879. {Xot Printed.) 
I 
No. 64 . . 1 Return shewing, as far as can be ascertained, the amount received for building 
I purposes of the several Hospitals and Charitable Institutions of the 

Province, either from the Government of Ontario, or from local sources. 

No. 65 . . Return from each County Treasurer of Ontario of the aggregate amount of 
moneys paid during the years 1868 and 1879 to members of County 
Councils, either by way of gratuity, salary, per diem allowance, mileage, 
or otherwise ; also, the aggregate amount of moneys paid during the same 
years to County or other officials in respect or on account of attendance 
or services rendered at sittings of the Council or of any Committee 
thereof ; also, the aggregate amount of all other payments made or 
expenses incurred during the same years, either in respect or by reason of 
the sittings of said Counties Council or of any Committee thereof ; and 
' also, the salaries paid to County officials during the same years. 

No. 66 . . Return of the total receipts and expenditure of the Agriculture and Arts 
Association for the years 1878 and 1879, as arranged under the different 
sub-heads, to be found in the Reports of the said Association. 

No. 67..' Return shewing; — 1. The names of all persons appointed by the Ontario 
Government as Special Commissioners or Committees of enquiry regarding 
matters pertaining to Provincial affairs since the year 1867 ; 2. A state- 
j ment of the subject-matter of investigation or enquiry in each case ; 3. A 

I statement of all expenses connected with such Commissioner or Committee 
I of enquiry in detail. 

No. 68 . . j Return of all correspondence between the Department of the Attorney- 
General and John Small, Esquire, Clerk in the office of the Coui-t of 
I Queen's Bench in Toronto. 

No. 69. .: Return shewing copy of Order in Council of 2nd December, 1870, subjecting 

timber cut in Crown Lands without license to a penalty of one hundred 

! dollars per thousand cubit feet on square timber, and one dollar per 

I standard saw-log ; a statement of all fines and penalties exacted under 

I the said Order in Council, with the names of the parties fined ; the 

I quantity of timber cut, and the amount exacted in each case ; a copy of 

all correspondence, departmental reports, reports of agents, and complaints 

' of aggrieved parties in reference to the said tines up to the first day of 

February, 1879 ; also, a statement of all timber cut in trespass on any 

• unlicensed, unsold or unlocated lands since the passing of the said Order, 

I upon which the penalty duty of ten cents per cubic foot was not charged. 

I {Not Printed.) 

No. 70 . . Return from each city, town, incorporated village and township (so far as 
heard from), shewing the amount placed on the Collector's Rolls for collec- 
tion for the years 1871 and 1878. {Xot Printed.) 

No. 71.. Return of any reports during the year 1879, by the License Commissioners 
I of the License Districts in which the Dunkin Act was in force, as to the 
working of the Act. fXof /*ri/Ued.J 



43 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1880 



Statement of amount of fees received and disbursements made by Sheriffs 
of the Province of Ontario for the half-year ending 31st December, 1879, 
in accordance with the provisions of cap. 3, section 2, of 42 Vic, Ontario. 



No. 72. 



No. 73. 



Return of the various tariffs of freight charged by the Hamilton and North- 
western Railway Company sinc3 its opening, with the dates at which such 
tariffs took effect. (Xot Printed.) 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) ' A. 1880 



REPORT 



OF THE 



^nmmi^nttntt of €xnvn ^andsi 



OF THE 



PKOVmCE OF ONTARIO 



FOR THE YEAR 



1879. 



Irintctl \ix\ OnUr of tlte p^bl^tiv^ g^isiiSi^mMy. 




^ 5:iot*onta: 

PRINTED BY C. BLAGKETT ROBINSON, 5 JORDAN STREET. 

1880. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



CONTENTS. 



Commissioner's Report : — page, 

Crown Land Sales v 

Clergy Land Sales v 

Common School Land Sales v, 

Grammar School Land Sales v 

Collections and Revenue v 

Disbursements v 

Revenue Arising from Crown Timber v 

Free Grants v 

Crown Surveys v 

Municipal Surveys vii. 

Mineral S urvey s vii. 

Colonization Roads vii. 

General Observations — Sales vii. 

" Woods and Forests viii. 

'* Mines and Minerals xvi. 

" Free Grants xvii. 



Appendices : — 

Return of Officers and Clerks in the Department 1 

" Crown Land Agents for sale of lands 3 

" ■' " for disposal of Free Grants 4 

Statement of lands sold, amounts of sales and collections 5 

" Gross Collections 6 

" Receipts, considered as Revenue 6 

" " SpecialFunds 7 

" Gross Disbursements 8 

" Letters Received and Mailed 11 

" Timber and amounts accrued from Dues, etc 12 

" Revenue collected from Woods and Forests 14 

Return of Crown Timber Agents 16 

" Locations, Sales, etc. , under Free Grants Act 16 

Statement of Crown Land Surveys completed during the year 19 

" " " in progress 20 

" Municipal Surveys for whicli instructions were issued 21 

" " confirmed 22 

" Mineral Lands patented in unsurveyed territory .' 23 

" Work performed in Survey Branch 24 



43 Victoria. Sessional Pcipers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



PAGE. 

Statement of Candidates who have passed Board of Examiners of Land Surveyors.... 25 

Report on Colonization Roads and Bridges 26 

" " North Division 27 

" " West Division 30 

" " East Division 37 

Summary of Expenditure 43 

Recapitulation 45 

Surveyors' Reports : — 

District of Parry Sound — Mowat 46 

" " Wallbridge 47 

District of Nipissing — Butt 47 

" " Paxton 49 

" " McCraney 50 

" " Ballentyne 51 

" " Finlayson 53 

District of Algoma — Gladstone 55 

' " Bright and Bright Additional 58 

" Parkinson 59 

* " Wells 60 

!/, " Day 62 



IV. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMISSIONER OF CROWN LANDS 

OF THE 

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO, 

FOR THE YEAR 1879. 



To His Honour the Honourable Doxald Alexander Macdonald, Lieutenant- 
Governor of tJie Province of Ontario: 

May it Please Your Honour, 

I have the honour, in conformity with the provisions of the Act respecting the sale 
and management of the Public Lands, of submitting to Your Honour the following Report 
of the proceedings, transactions and aflfairs of the Department of Crown Lands, for 
the year 1879, commencing as usual with statistical details and concluding by general 
observations. 

CROWN LANDS. 

There were sold of the Crown Lands, during the year 1879, 25,071 acres. The salee 
amount to $25,489, and the collections to $45,670. (^'ee Appendix No. 4, page 5). 

CLERGY LANDS. 

There were sold of the Clergy Linds, during the year 1879, 2,488 acres. The sales 
amount to $3,0G3, and the collections to $20,186. [See Appendix No. ^, page 5). 

COMMON SCHOOL LANDS. 

There were sold of tlie Common School Lands, during the year 1879, 1,463 acres. 
The sales amount to $4,824, and the collections to $46,988. {See Appendix No. 4, page 5). 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 188Q 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL LANDS. 

There were sold of the Grammar School Lands, during the year 1879, 1,279 acres. The 
sales amount to $1,84:2, and the collections to $4,782. [See Apjyendix No. 4, page 5). 

COLLECTIONS AND REVENUE. 

The total collections in the Department, during the year, amount to $457,340, of 
which $378,746 may be considered as Revenue. [See Ajipendices Nos. 5 and 6, page 

6). 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

The gross disbursements of the Department, for the year 1879, amounts to $201,499. 
[See Appendix No. 8, pages 8, 9 and 10). 

REVENUE ARISING FROM CROWN TIMBER. 

The accrual for timber dues, ground rents, etc., during the year 1879, is $342,894.69. 
(See Appendix No. 10, pages 12 and 13). 

The amount collected on account of timber dues, ground rents, etc., during the year 
is $332,014.47. (See Ap>pendix No. 11, page 14). 

FREE GRANTS. 

At the date of my last Report there were open for location under the Free Grants 
and Homestead Act, 94 Townships, and no fm-ther additions having been made during 
the year the number remains the same, that is to say, 94 Townships now open for location. 

During the year 1879, 1,506 locations were made on 199,500 acres of land, 4,911 
acres were sold to 123 locatees. 

During the same period 1,018 lots located in former years were cancelled for non- 
performance of duties, and 513 Patents were issued to Free Grant settlers. [See Apperi- 
dix No. 13, pages 16, 17 and 18). 

CROWN SURVEYS. 

The following surveys have been performed during the year. The Townships 
of Mowat, Wallbridge, McCraney, Ballantyne, Butt, and Paxton, in the Huron and 
Ottawa Territory, have been subdivided into farm lots of one hundred acres each, and the 
Townships of Bright and Bright Additional, Day, Gladstone, Parkinson and Wells, on 
the North Shore of Lake Huron, in the District of Algoma, into lots of three hundred 
and twenty acres each, all the above named Surveys excepting those of Wallbridge and 
Butt have been completed and closed. 

The returns of the Townships of Nightingale and Finlayson, in the Huron and 
Ottawa Territory, surveyed into farm lots in 1878, not having been received at the date 
of my last Report, have been completed and closed during the year. 

The particulars in relation to all these Surveys, with the Surveyors' Reports will be 
found in Apj^endices Nos. 14, 15 and 22 to 33, 2^ages 19, 20 and 46 to 62. 

vi. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 18«0 



MUNICIPAL SURVEYS. v 

Nine Municipal Surveys have been confirmed during the year, consisting of the 
establishing and planting of stone or other durable monuments at the angles of lots, or in 
concession lines in the Townships of Georgina, West Gwillimbury, Howard, Pickering, 
Raleigh, Ross, Scugog, Thorah, and Uxbridge. 

Instructions were issued for eleven Municipal Surveys during the year ; four of 
which, have been completed and returned to the office, and approved and are included 
in those above mentioned. 

The particulars will be found in Appendices Nos. 16 and 17, j^ages 21 and 22. 

MINERAL SURVEYS. 

Nine hundred and thirty-nine acres on the North Shores of Lakes Huron and 
Superior, in unsurveyed territory, have been patented for mining purposes during the 
year, the purchasers furnishing to the Department, Surveyors' Plans, Field-notes, and 
Descriptions of the Survey of their locations as required by the "General Mining Act." 
[See Appendix No. 18, p>age 23). 

COLONIZATION ROADS. 

The total expenditure on Colonization Roads during the year 1879, amounts to 
$111,903.82, the particulars of which will be found in the Superintendent's Report. 
{Appendix No. 21, pages 26 to 45). 

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 

Sales. 

The greater part of the Public Lands lying West of Toronto and South of Lake Huron 
having been disposed of and the chief part of the arrears due on former sales paid, there 
did not appear to be any further necessity for continuing the Crown Land Agencies 
•established in the several counties with the exception of that for the County of Bruce. 
The Agencies for the Counties of Wellington, Huron, Perth and Grey have therefore 
been withdrawn and closed. 

The moneys paid into the Department on account of the arrears due on former sales 
becoming diminished from year to year and the withdrawal from sale of so many Town- 
ships, embracing some of the best lands at the disposal of the Crown, and appropriating 
them as Free Grants, under the Free Grants and Homestead Law of 18G8, are causing 
(as might be expected) a rapid diminution in the revenue arising from the sale of Crown 
Lands. 

It has been generally supposed that the lands lying on tlie North Shore of Lake 
Huron between the Bruce Mines and French River were of a rocky and sterile character, 
and, with few exceptions, unfit for agricultural purposes, but a recent exploration and 
survey of several townships in that locality have shown that although the general fea- 
-tures of the country are rough and rugged, there are found nevertheless, considerable 
tracts of land well adapted for settlement. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



Parties seeking lands for settlement have had their attention drawn to these 
newly surveyed townships, and the consequence is that a considerable number of the lots 
are now occupied by squatters who report having raised excellent crops and express 
themselves well satisfied with their locations. 

Many of the surveyed toAvnships in the Muskoka, Parry Sound, Nipissing and 
Algoma Districts containing a large area of lands well adapted for agricultural purposes, 
are now occupied by squatters, some of whom have made extensive improvements, but 
the lands containing much valuable pine timber suitable for commercial purposes, and not 
being under license it has been found impracticable to place them in the market either 
for sale or location as Free Grants. It is hoped however that during the present Session 
of the Legislature such an Amendment ^vi[\ be made in the Act for the management of 
the Crown Timber as will justify the Department in opening the lands in these town- 
ships for settlement. 

The Western extension of the Canada Central Railway having been completed to 
the distance of about 45 miles above Pembroke, and the remainder of the line from that 
point to its terminus at the east end of Lake Nipissing (a further distance of about 80 
miles), being under contract and considerably advanced towards completion, it may be 
fairly assumed that the line will be nearly completed during the year 1880. This line 
will connect with the projected Sault St. Marie line, and it is probable that the Ontario 
Pacific Junction Railway will at an early day, be completed through the Muskoka and 
Parry Sound Districts, and form a junction with the said Railways in the vicinity of 
Lake Nipissing. 

These lines when completed will pass thi'ougli and open up a vast tract of country, 
nuch of which is good agricultural land, well adapted for stock-raising and dairy pur- 
poses. It also abounds in mineral wealth, and contains valuable pine and other timber 
suitable for commercial purposes. 

WOODS AND FORESTS. 

After having had to report for a number of years an unfavourable condition of the 
timber trade, it is gratifying to be in a position to announce that the year 1879 has shewn 
a decided improvement in what I consider the most important branch of the business 
viz.: — 

SAWN LUMBER. 

During the season just closed the American market has exhibited something like its 
old time activity, with considerable advance in prices, the latter being, however, neutralized,, 
to some extent, by an increase in freight charge, owing to the great demand for vessels to 
carry grain, ett., a drawback which will be probably provided against during the coming 
winter by the building of additional tonnage. 

The marked revival in the lumber business throughout the season may be looked 
upon as an indication that the trade has at last emerged from the gloom which has so long 
overshadowed it, and it may be reasonably expected that for years to come transactions 
will be fairly remunerative to shippers and dealers generally ; a steady and continuous 

viii. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 

market and profitable returns being preferable to inflated values such as obtained in 1872 
and previous years. 

With reference to sa^vn lumber, I would call the attention of Canadian saw-mill 
owners to a transaction which, in my opinion, should be both interesting and suggestive 
to them, inasmuch as it points to the opening up of a new outlet for the product of their 
mills, and, at the same time, an escape from the duty of $2 per thousand feet, which meets 
them on shipments to the United States and renders it almost, if not altogether, impossible 
for them to compete with lumber from Michigan, especially when prices in the foreign 
market are low — I allude to the fact that a shipment of inch and inch-and-a-quarter sawn 
lumber was lately made direct from the mills at Ottawa, via the Montreal, Ottawa and 
Occidental and North Shore Railways to Quebec to be laden aboard a vessel for Glasgow 
— the transaction referred to, so far as the dealers in Ottawa are concerned, was not one 
of speculation but an outright purchase at the lumber yards by the shippers ; the prices 
realized on delivery at the yards in Ottawa were as follows : — one inch " shipping culls," 
$6 to $8 per M. ; " log-run sidings," one inch, $9 per M. ; a lot of one inch and one-and-a- 
quarter inch stuff (not classed) from $8.50 to $15 per M. ; the total quantity forwarded by 
rail to Quebec being 451,407 feet, board measure, the vessel having a carrying capacity 
of 480,000 feet, board measure, that is equal to 800 loads of fifty cubic feet or 1,000 tons of 
forty cubic feet of square timber ; the rate of freight across the Atlantic has not been 
ascertained nor the rate by rail from Ottawa to Quebec ; the former is generally arranged 
by charter party in Britain and is fluctuating ; the rate by rail is understood to have been 
very favourable to the shippers; but as the two railway lines mentioned are expected soon 
to be amalgamated and the shipment being one of a new and unusual character, which in 
the near future may assume large proportions, there was a reluctance to disclose the 
terms of transport. 

Hitherto the produce of Canadian saw mills shipped to Europe has been in the shape 
of deals only, for the manufacture of which none but the very best of pine is brought 
into requisition, as the article is used on the other side of the Atlantic for fine finishing 
in buildings for which purpose the deals are cut up at saw mills into various thicknesses 
and dimensions after they reach the old country ; the class of timber used in Canada for 
the manufacture of deals is not to be found in Europe and can meet with no competition 
in transatlantic ports, except from the United States, notably by deals from Michigan ; the 
Baltic ports supply no pine of a texture fine enough for the uses to which American pine 
is applied ; under the circumstances the shipment of inch lumber from Ottawa to Glasgow 
direct has an important significance, and it is hoped it may lead to such a change in the 
wood trade between this country and Europe as will not only result in profit to those 
engaged in it, but at the same time enhance the value of the pino forests in the lumber 
producing Provinces of the Dominion to which reference is made farther on in connection 
with the square timber trade. 

The penetration of railways into the remote parts of the country as it proceeds will 
mark a revolutionary era in the timber trade ; already where timber limits worked upon 
are remote the pi'oject has been entertained by saw-mill owners at Ottawa, of moving 
their mills from where they are now situated in the vicinity of the city, to localities 
nearer to the source of timber supply, a step which would do away with the tedious and 

ix. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 18£0 



I 



expensive process of bringing the saw logs by water to the Chaiidiere, an operation whicli, 
owing to the falling off of the volume of water in the streams, in many cases extends 
into the second year and sometimes even to the third year after they have been cut in thft 
vroods before they reach the point of manufacture, during which time the owner of the 
logs not only suffers the loss of interest on the capital invested in the timber so delayed, 
but he also frequently sustains great loss of valuable timber in the course of transit. 

The Canada Central Railway has already brought lumber from the mills at Pembroke 
which before the advent of that road would have been limited to the uncertainty of a 
local market, or other\\'ise the logs from which the lumber was produced subjected to the 
delay and expense of being taken to the saw-mills at Ottawa or even farther down the 
river as price or demand for the timber might render necessary or advisable. 

When the Canada Central Railway reaches the vicinity of Lake Nipissing, and the 
proposed Ontario Pacific junction from Gravenhurst has been built, saw-mills will no 
doubt be erected on the lake, at which timber now locked up for the want of means of 
taking in supplies and the absence of a practicable outlet, will be manufactured into sawn 
lumber and speedily transported by either of the lines to points from which it can be 
shipped to Canadian or foreign markets ; the only outlet at present from the extensive 
region referred to is by River Wahanapitae and French River, the former entering the 
latter at a short distance above where it empties into the Georgian Bay ; no timber has 
been brought from the iipper waters of the Wahanapitae, and the only venture of taking 
timber down French River was last winter, when some square pine was brought from 
South Bay, then rafted to Waubashene, and taken from thence by the Midland Railway 
to Port Hope, and finally by water to Quebec ; the same party who brought down the 
square timber last year, it is understood, has entered into a contract with the 
Maganetawan Lumber Co. to cut, at South Bay, Lake Nipissing, a large quantity of saw- 
logs to be taken down French River and delivered in spring at Byng Inlet to be there 
manufactured into lumber. 

SQUARE PINE TIMBER. 

During the year the square pine trade has been in a state of utter stagnation, at least 
until a few weeks before the close of navigation, when it is understood that some large 
quantities of timber (principally the produce of the Province of Quebec) changed 
hands for shipment in spring, on the faith of an expected brisk demand in the British 
market next season ; the prices ol)tained at these sales have not transpired. 

The great loss sustained yearly by the Province and the Revenue from waste of 
valuable material in the manufacture of square and waney pine, especially in connection 
with the former which is hewn to a " proud edge," has for some time occupied my serious 
attention. 

It is estimated on good grounds that one-fourth of every tree cut down to be made 
into square or waney timber, is lost to the wealth of the country, and that the revenue 
suffers proportionately : — When the tree is cut down it is lined off for squaring, and the 
" round" outside of the lines is what is called beaten off on the four sides ; the wood thus 
beaten or slashed off in preparation for hewing by the broad axe is the prime part of the 
tree, from which the best class of clear lumber is obtained when the timber is taken in the 

X. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 

round to a saw-mill : — besides the destruction of timber of the finest texture and greatest 
value, there is the upper portion of the tree near to, and partly into the top, which would 
yield lumber, of an inferior quality it is true, but suitable either for domestic use or for 
export to the American market, where during general business prosperity, large quantities 
of the lower grades of lumber are required for packing and other purposes connected with 
trade of all kinds ; as much as one hundred million feet, it is stated, being sold annually, 
by two or three firms in Brooklyn and New York, to be used as boxes for packages of 
petroleum alone ; but the upper part of the tree is rejected by the square tunber manufac- 
turer, and left in the woods with the fine wood beaten off, to rot and become material for 
feeding fires in the foi'ests, by Avhich more timber has been destroyed than has ever been 
cut down for commercial purposes. 

The following will shew the estimated loss to the Province and the Revenue from 
waste in getting out square pine, from 1868 to 1877, both inclusive : — Total quantity taken 
from public and private lands during the ten years, 119,250,420 cubic feet ; waste, one-fourth 
of each tree, equal to one-third of the total mentioned, viz. : 39,750,140 cubic feet, or 
say in round numbers 477 million feet board measure, which may be valued one-half at 
$10 per 1,000 feet, and one-half at $5 per 1,000 feet, representing relatively the prime 
timber beaten off and the inferior timber from the upper part of the tree, average value 
say $7.50 per 1,000 feet, equal to $3,577,500 loss to the Province for the ten years, or an 
annual loss in material wealth of $357,750.00. 

The quantity taken from public lands during the ten years is 87,620,135 cubic feet, 
the waste on which on the basis given being equal to 29,206^711 cubic feet, or 350 mil- 
lion feet board measure subject to crown dues at $750 per million feet equal to $262,500 
lost to the Revenue during the ten years, or at the rate of $26,250.00 per annum. 

The loss to the country and revenue from timber destroyed by tires which might 
have been confined to a limited area, and possibly extinguished, before great damage had 
been done to the forest, had they not been fed by the debris of trees left to rot and dry, is 
incalculable. 

In 1877 I instructed the officer in charge of the Woods and Forests Branch of the 
Department to prepare a paper on the subject of the waste of timber referred to, for the 
purpose of submitting it to the Department of Crown Lands, Quebec, with the view of 
joint action by the two Provinces, towards the discouragement of the further continuance 
of the square timber trade. On addressing himself to the task, he found that the lack of 
knowledge of the mode of dealing with the square timber after its arrival in the old 
country in the square " log," was a great drawback to writing intelligently on the subject, 
as it was essential to know how the timber was disposed of at the great centres of import 
such as Liverpool, London, Glasgow, (fee. ; who the parties were who ultimately acquired 
the handling of it ; where it was cut up into specification bills to meet the wants of those 
who put the products of the " logs" after they had been reduced to the required dimensions, 
to practical use, <kc., so that the Department might be in possession of facts more or less 
important, when it undertook to shew those who are engaged in the trade in Canada that 
in abandoning it, and thereby stopping the supply of square timber, they would create a 
market for their material on the other side of the Atlantic, in the shape of sawn lumber. 

I have since procured some information on the points referred to, from which I learn 

xi. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



that the timber is imported direct by wealthy saw-mill proprietors, either by the venture 
of individuals singly, in so many cargoes each year, or the importation of a number of 
cargoes annually by several saw-mill men combined ; or it is consigned by Canadian 
shippers to brokers or agents to be sold on commission ; in the latter case, the timber is 
generally disposed of by auction at which the saw-mill owners purchase it, and any 
surplus over what they require for their own establishments they sell in small quantities, 
sometimes a few pieces at a time to builders and country dealers of limited means who 
have it sawn at small mills, and often by hand, at the villages in the interior for local 
wants. These saw-mill proprietors having virtually a monopoly of the lumber and bill 
stuff produced from the timber imported or purchased by them at auction sales, are 
naturally opposed to the introduction of wood goods into the market they supply in any 
other shape than in the square log as at present, but it is time that the Canadian lumberer, 
engaged in the square pine business, should open his eyes to the alarming waste of 
a material, the value of which is increasing every year ; (that in fact he is stripping his 
limits and disposing of his timber frequently at a loss, or at best, during several years 
past, at a rate which seldom pays more than the cost of cutting down, squaring, draw- 
ing, and taking to market, while at the same time he leaves in the woods as useless 
one-fourth of each tree he levels to the ground, one-half of the timber so left being 
the most valuable part of the tree) ; and see the necessity of turning his attention to 
saw-milling operations as a more economical m.ode of manufacturing his timber, by which 
he would not only benefit himself by turning to profitable account what is now so 
wantonly wasted, but the Province generally, by increasing the field of labour for its 
people, while the Pro\T.ncial Treasury would derive additional revenue from the material 
saved and utilized. 

It may not be out of place to mention here that saw-milling is, to a certain extent, a 
factor in the settlement of the country, from the fact that many of the employes, from 
their steady habits and value as workmen, are kept in permanent employment summer 
and winter, in connection with the establishments, and are induced in consequence to take 
up lands in the vicinity, which are improved by the families of those having grown up 
children, and by hired help in the case of unmarried men, till ultimately considerable 
sections in the neighborhood of the mills become settled and cleared, with comfortable 
homes on the locations ; while on the contrary, the men employed in getting out square 
timber are generally without fixed homes or continuous employment. Their engagements 
terminate in the spring ; in the interim, until they re-engage for the following winter, 
they too frequently remain idle and spend their earnings in a reckless manner, and are 
penniless, and often in debt, when they return to the woods. 

In view of what has been stated regarding the waste of valuable timber and conse- 
quent loss to the country and the revenue, it is to be hoped that those who hold timber 
limits and have confined their operations to the manufacture of square pine, will see the 
propriety and necessity of speedily reducing the production to the smalless possible extent 
with the object of wholly withdrawing from the trade at an early day. 

I would here advert to information which has been furnished me through official 
correspondence with Mr. C. Berven, a gentleman in the timber trade in Britain. Mr. 
Berven informs me that, in his opinion, a large and profitable trade might be entered 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 

into between Canada and the west coast of England, in mining timber and pit props, etc., 
which hare so far been imported from Norway, Sweden, and Finland, to the east coast, 
but the transport by rail to the vicinity of the mines on the west coast being expensive, 
he considers that Canada could successfully compete with the Baltic source of supply, by 
shipping direct to the point of destination, by which rail transport would be avoided. 

The following is a synopsis of Mr. Berven's reply to my letter of 1 2th of November, 
putting a series of questions on the subject referred to : 

Pit props and mining timber, can be used of red pine, fir, tamarac (larch), in their 
round state with the bark mostly taken off, so that it can be stqwed and handled better ; 
some colliery people prefer the bark off altogether. Dimensions — 3 inches diameter across 
the small end ; 10 feet and upwards in length, with an average length of 18 to 19 feet ; 
4 inches diameter ; 10 feet and upwards in length, average length, 16 to 17 feet ; 5 inches 
diameter, average 17 to 18 feet in length. To stow these properly, short props can be 
sent as stowage in the following sizes : diameter at small end, 3 inches ; lengths, 3^ and 4 
feet ; 4 inches, 4, 4|, 5, oj, 6, 6|, 7 feet; 5 inches, 5, 5|, 6, Qh feet ; 6 inches, 5|, 6, 6J, 
7 feet ; 7 inches, 5J, 6, 6 J, 7 feet. 

SQUARE MINING TIMBER. 

Same sort of wood 10 feet and upwards in. length, average 25 to 26 feet in length, 
from 6 to 9 inches in diameter in the middle ; this class of timber is shipped from Sweden, 
hewn square in the tree length, of course, tapering as the tree is shaped. 

Partly squared Mining Timber, same sort of wood, same dimensions, not so well squared 
as the previous mentioned, usually having a wane of 1 to 2 inches. 

TELEGRAPH POLES 

of fir trees, to be round, hard-grown, straight, and felled between 1st November and 2Sth 
February, each tree to have the natural butt, and to be free of large and dead knots and 
other defects; length of poles in feet 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 45, 55, 
minimum diameter in inches at top end, 5, 5, 5^, 5|, 6, 6, 6J, 6|, 6|, 6i, 6^, 6f, 7, 7;j: — 
minimum diameter in inches 5 feet from butt, 7|, 7|, 8, 8 J, 8|, 9, 9|^, 9|, 10, 10|, lOf, 
111 191 13 

RAILWAY SLEEPERS. 

These are of fir and are imported from Russia, of the following sizes, chiefly 8 feet 1 1 
inches long 10 x 10 inches, 9 feet long 10 x 10 inches; they are imported in these sizes 
but are used for the railways 8{^ feet 10 x 5 inches, and 9 feet 10 x 5 inches; the wood 

in all cases to be straight, in order to bear the pressure ; the fine grain would be best, but 

f 
no well-grown wood is refused. With regard to the average annual imports for a series o 

years Mr. Berven says it would take him a long time to make up a proper statement, but 

his calculation is that on an average about 50,000,000 running feet of pit-props 3 to 4 

jnches at the top end; and 1 to 1^ million cubic feet of 5 inch round timber, square and 

partly squared mining timber are the average annual imports into West Hartlepool. 

The import has not been large this year, but as many as 60 to 80 cargoes, principally 

in steamers of 1,000 tons burthen, have been imported into the above port yearly for a 

xiii. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



number of years. Mr. Berven says " this trade would be a profitable one to the west 
coast." Telegraph poles, 2-5,000 to 30,000, various lengths, could be taken yearly. 

The average prices of props, delivered at Hartlepool during the last year, were about 
as follows, viz. .• — 



3 


inch 


long 


props 


4s. 




4 




a 




.5s. 




5 




(( 




Gs. 




3 




short 




3s. 


3d. 


4 




a 




3s. 


9d. 


5 




a 




5s. 





per 72 running feet. 



Kound and partly square mining timber 32s. 6d. to 35s. 6d. per load of 50 cubic feet string 
or tape measure (^th girth). Square timber 40s. per load of 50 cubic feet calliper measure, 
square railway sleepers 10 x 10, 4s. each ; telegraph poles 38s. to 42s. per load of 50 cubic 
feet string measure. 

The prices mentioned are sterling money, and are the average for about ten years, 
prices have been very low of late, but are now rising ; besides the articles enumerated, a 
very great quantity of wood of various descriptions, can be utilized and cut into different 
sizes for small tubs (used under ground in collieries), boxes tfec, and small sleepers for tram- 
ways in the mines :— Birch for bobbins, &c., is also required 3jV to 4 inches at top, to aver- 
age 6 feet in length ; the bark chipped off so that it may dry, the chippiiig off of the bark 
to be only here and there along the tree, leaving some bark on to prevent it from splitting ; 
this is worth about Is. per cubic foot at Liverpool, c. i. f. (cost, insurance and freight) ; 
ships are chartered principally per 1,500 running feet for 3, 4, 5, inch top, long props and 
short in proportion ; round, partly square, and squared, per 50 cubic feet string measure ; 
what is meant by round timber is poles 5 inch, to 6 inch at top ends, sold by ^ girth measure, 
prices already mentioned. Mr. Berven concludes by saying, " I think the trade in timber 
between England and Canada, is not half cultivated and something should be done to 
bring it forward." 

The characteristic of modern commerce is to seek out markets wherever they can be 
found, in which commodities to be disposed of can be sold to the best advantage, whether 
natural products in a raw state where the means of profitable manufacture do not exist 
where they are produced, or in a manufactured state when such means are available; and 
in proportion to the energy and enterprise used in pi-essing forward and occupying every 
vantage ground in trade, is the measure of success which attends individuals and com- 
munities. It is not usual in these days to wait until a customer comes knocking at your 
door to tind out what you have for sale : to succeed, it is necessary that such should be 
made known far and wide ; and to create a business of any magnitude, the iirst object is 
to find out what is required not only at home but abroad, and harinf/ the article, to calcu- 
late whether or not the field can be entered at a fair profit in furnishing what is wanted. 
lu the Canadian timber trade there seems to have been no lack of energy, but in my humble 
opinion, it does not appear to have been accompanied by that kind of prudent enterprise 
v/hich might be expected from the intelligent men who are engaged in it. The square 
pine manufacturers have been contented from year to year to go on bargaining with a 

xiv. 



43 Victoria. Sessioaal Papers (No 4.) A. 1880 



Quebec merchant to get out so many cubic feet of a certain average, for a price agreed 
upon ; the merchant writes home to his agent or partner to effect sales, or goes himself or some 
one for him, for that purpose, or frequently ships on his own account the timber which the 
lumberer has contracted for and delivered to him. Not unfrequently the lumberer possessed 
of means gets out his timber without advances in money or supplies having been made 
to him, takes it to Quebec to sell it at the best price he can obtain from the dealers there. 
Sometimes this has succeeded better than contracting, but where the venture fails through 
a downward tendency in the market, or a rise in freights, it becomes a serious matter to 
hold it over, as cove charges and other incidentals rapidly effect a shrinkage in the value 
of the article. But so it has gone on since the early days of getting out square pine; the 
same well-trodden rut has been travelled; the same traffic in the timber in the crude 
shape of the square " log" has been continued without apparently the actual producer and 
quasi proprietor of the pine upon the timber limits reflecting on the waste of material, or 
the propriety and prudence of econominizing it and turning it to more profitable account. 
Saw-mill owners, although they have had trying times during the past few years, are 
not generally so unfortunate as the operators in square pine, the trade in which is 
peculiarly fluctuating and uncertain. The former have always had more or less of a 
domestic trade, and, unless under extraordinary circumstances, such as the late prolonged 
depression, can depend on the United States for a market, with prices generally affording 
a reasonable profit, notwithstanding the American duty of $2 per 1,000 feet; and with 
these markets, domestic and aci'oss the line, they have hitherto seemed to be satisfied with- 
out seeking a European opening for their lumber. 

1 feel a delicacy in giving advice in this matter to parties who may very naturally 
say that they know their own business best, but neverthele.js I would venture to observe 
that those in Canada engaged or interested in the trade in timber, which is next in value 
to agricultural products in the exports of the Dominion, viz. : In 1878 — $20,054,829 and 
$27,281,089 respectively, should acquire a knowledge of and endeavour to cultivate a 
trans- Atlantic ti-ade, and would suggest that a spirited effort should be made to extend the 
sawn lumber business to countries which have hitherto imported the timber in a crude 
state and manufactured it to suit their purposes. Already have the European and other 
markets been successfully invaded by the produce of industries of various kinds from the 
American continent, and there seems to be no reason why our great staple export should 
not meet with equal success. 

It may seem out of place in this report, to indicate in anything like detail, the steps 
which might be adopted to carry out what has been hinted at, but a preliminary step 
would seem to be for a few saw-mill proprietors to join together and send to the Old 
(Country two or three practical men having a thorough knowledge of lumbering, the 
different qualities of lumber produced in Canada, and the minuti;e of the working of saw- 
mills, who might be accompanied by one or two joiners or house-carpenters, to make 
technical observations as to the various uses and forms in which the lumber is applied. 
Let these parties visit the larger saw-mills in England, Ireland and Scotland, and on the 
continent if deemed expedient, with sufficient time allowed to inspect and report on the 
whole subject to their employers, having specially in view the required dimensions of 

XV. 



43 Vic:;oha. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



boards and bill stuff, in all forms, which would suit the several markets; and also make 
inquiry as to freights, insurance, port charges, &c., and upon such report, and after due 
consideration, the parties interested would be in a position to come to a conclusion whether 
or not a fair paying business could be pushed in the direction indicated. The attempt 
would seem to be worth making; and if prepared assortments of Canadian lumber were 
exhibited in the principal markets of the Old Country, even although they may not take 
at first, vrhich perhaps would be too much to expect, there is at least a prospect of success 
through the exercise of sound judgment, patience and perseverance. 

MINES AND MINERALS. 

All that part of the Province of Ontario composed of the rear Townships in the 
Counties of Lanark, Frontenac, Addington, Hastings, Peterboro' and Victoria are found 
to be rich in mineral wealth, their chief productions being gold and iron. 

GOLD. 

It will doubtless be within the recollection of many that at the time the famous Rich- 
ardson Mine was discovered in Madoc, several parties not possessed of sufficient caution or 
practical experience in mining, met wdth serious losses in their endeavour to carry on 
mining for gold in the townships of Madoc and Marmora. This caused a reaction, and 
some years of depression in mining interests followed. Some parties, however, having 
confidence in the richness of the gold-bearing quartz, continued operations with varied 
success, and it has only been within the last eighteen months, when science and practical 
experience have been brought to bear that the richness of the Madoc and Marmora gold 
fields have been fully established. Large sums of money have recently been expended in 
the erection of improved machinery for crushing the rock and separating the gold from it, 
and those engaged in the business entertain the most sanguine hopes of success. 

SILVER. 

Some rich specimens of silver ore have been recently found in the vicinity of Three 
Mile Lake, in the Township of Ryerson, in the District of Muskoka. A company was 
formed in Buffalo last summer to work a mine in that township, and are said to have 
sunk a shaft to a considerable depth and are now drifting and following the vein. Those 
interested in the undertaking entertain sanguine hopes for the future. 

IRON. 

The Townships of Marmora and Madoc have been known for several years past to 
contain large deposits of iron ore, but the heavy costs of transportation combined with 
the low prices of iron, have until very recently deterred parties from utilizing the mines to 
any considerable extent, and it has been only within the last year that railroads have been 
carried into the interior by which facilities have been furnished for carrying away the 
ore, that the real value of the immense deposits in the counties of Hastings, Peterboro' 
and Victoria have become fully known. 

The ore, particularly that which is obtained in the township of Madoc, is said to 

xvi. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



be of the very best description found in America for the manufacture of Bessemer steel, 
and about 200 tons liave been shipped from two of the Madoc mines daily for several 
^\ eeks past to the United States, while a considerable quantity has been shipped from 
other mines to the same destination. 

Iron ore is also found in large quantities in the Counties of Lanark, Frontenac and 
Addington, and some thousands of tons have been dug up within the last six years and 
■conveyed to Brockville and Kingston and thence shipped to the United States. I am 
therefore led to hope that the iron interests in Ontario are about to assume large pro- 
portions. 

LEAD GALENA, 

containing a percentage of silver, has also been discovered in several of the back townships 
and worked to a considerable extent, but for some reason or other the works have been 
discontinued. 

PHOSPHATES 

have been discovered in the rear townships, and large quantities conveyed to Brockville 
and Kingston and thence shipped to Europe, but the price of the mineral having greatly 
declined, the enterprise has been suffered to languish, but it is hoped that better prices 
will soon be obtained, when phosphate mining^will again be carried on with profit. 

ASBESTOS 

is said to have been discovered in the Township of Lake, from which several fair samples 
Jiave been obtained, but the mine not having been properly opened its value cannot now 
bo ascertained. 

MINING ON LAKE SUPEEIOR. 

Silver Islet appears to be producing its usual quantity of the precious metal, and 
mining operations in the other parts of the Thunder Bay District, although not carried on 
with increased energy during the year, have nevertheless, been sufficiently successful to 
inspire hopes for the future. 

Prospecting has been carried on to some considerable extent in the neighbourhood of 
Pigeon River and on the Islands in the Lake of the Woods, and some rich specimens of 
gold bearing quartz are said to have been discovered, but the mines have not been suf- 
ficiently tested to determine their value. 

FREE GRANTS. 

A considerable decrease is found to have taken place in the number of locations this 
year, when compared with those of 1877 and 1878, the number in the former being 1,914, 
and in the latter 2,115; but this decrease may be easily accounted for. Firstly, by the 
preference given to the Prairie Provinces of the North- West; and secondly, by the fact 
that no new townships have been appropriated as Free Grants during the year, and the 
parties who would have been located there in due form, had the lands been open, have 
occupied them as squatters, and their names have consequently not been included in the 
list of locations for the year 1879. These newly surveyed townships were withheld from 

xvii. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



location until an amendment would be made to the Act relating to the pine timber, which 
is expected to take place this Session, after which these townships will be thrown open, 
and the hundreds of parties who now occupy the lands as squatters will be located in 
due form. 

Representations have been repeatedly made to my Department that the present prac- 
tice of permitting females to take up lands under the Free Grants Act is open to great abuse, 
because a very small percentage only of this class of locatees ever comply with the regula- 
tions regarding settlement. In most cases the lands so located are secured for the benefit 
of the father, or other relatives, who already hold all the land the law allows and all they 
can conveniently work. The consequence is the lands remain unimproved, the progress 
of the settlement is retarded, and new settlers are forced to go farther back. Being 
convinced that these complaints are well founded, and finding upon inquiry that the 
experience of other Provinces which have adopted the Free Grant system has led 
them to the same conclusion, I have recommended the passing of an Act this Session 
changing the law in this respect. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. B. Pardee, 
Commissioner of Crown Lands. 

Department of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, 31st December, 1879. 



XVlll. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 4.) 



A. 1880 



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43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 4.) 



A. 1880 



APPENDIX No. 4. 

Statement of Acres of Land Sold, Amount of Sales, and Amount of Collections 

for the year^l879. 



SERVICE. 



Crown Lands 

Clergy Lands 

Common School Lands. 
Grammar School Lands 



Total. 



Acres Sold 

1 


Amount of 

Sales. 


Amount 
ot Collections. 


1 
1 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


1 25,071 


25,489 47 


45,670 22 


2,488 


3,063 36 


20,186 49 


1,463 


4,824 04 


1 46,987 85 

1 


1,279 

i 


1,842 61 


4,782 56 


1 

30,301 


1 35,219 48 

j 


117,627 12 



THOS. H JOHNSON, 

Assistani Commissiotier. 



WILLIAM FORD, 

Accountant. 

Department of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, 31st December, 1879. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 4. 



A. 1880 



APPENDIX No. 5. 
Statement of Gross Collections of the Department of Crown Lands for 1879. 



SERVICE. 



Crown Lands 

Clergy Lands 

Common School Lands . . . 
Grammar School Lands . . 

Woods and Forests 

Casual Fees 

Inspection Fees 

Surveyor's Fee Fund 

Settlers' Homestead Fund 
Suspense Account 



$ cts. 


45,670 22 

20,186 49 

46,987 85 

4,782 56 

332,014 47 

389 45 

197 65 

181 35 

292 88 

6,637 35 


457,340 27 



THOS. H. JOHNSON, 

Assistant Commissioner. 



WILLIAM FORD, 

Accountant. 

Departjient op Crown Lands, 
Toronto, 31st December, 



1879. 



APPENDIX No. 6. 

Statement of the Receipts of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1879, 
which are considered as Revenue. 



SERVICE. 


$ cts. 


Crown Lands 


45.670 22 


Woods and Forests 


332,014 47 


Casual Fees . . . . . 


389 45 


Board of Surveyors . 


181 35 


Inspection Fees 


197 65 


Settlers' Homestead Fund 


292 88 










378,746 02 


WILLIAM FORD, 

Accottntant. 


THOS. H. JOHNSOIS 

Assistant C 


'ommissioner. 



Department of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, 31st December, 1879. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) 



A. 1880 



APPENDIX 7 

Statement of the Receipts of the Department of Crown Lands, for the year 1879, which 

are considered as Special Funds. 



SERVICE. 


$ c. 


S c. 


Clergy Lands : 

Principal 


12,664 25 
7,522 24 




Interest 


20,186 49 


Common School Lands : 

Principal 

Interest 


25,467 78 
21,520 07 




46,987 85 


(irammar School Lands : 

Principal 

Interest ... .... 


3,716 40 
1,066 16 




4,782 56 








71,956 90 


Refunds : 

Common School Lands , 




619 17 







THOS. H. JOHNSON, 

Assistant Commissioner. 



WILLIAM FORD, 

Accoitntant. 



Department of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, 31st December, 1879 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 4 ) 



A. 1880 



APPENDIX No. 8. 

Statement of the Gross Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the 

vear 1879. 



SERVICE 



Agents' Salaries and Disbubsemknts. 

Commusion. 

A. S. Cadenhead 

Jno. F. Day 

H. Hamilton 

William Jackson .... . . 

J. McKibbon 

A. McNabb 



Agents' Salaries. — Lund. 

D. Anderson . . . . 

S. G. Best . 

J. Bowker , 

C. P. Brown 

Jno. F. Day 

J. K. Dawson 

J. W. Fitzgerald 

E. Handy ... . , 

Adam Kennedy 

J. Mahon 

E. Macpherson 

Thos. McMurray 

H. Mackay 

Jas. Keeves 

J. R. Tait 

Aubrey White 

Amos Wright 



$ cts. 



28 29 

34 26 

211 17 

171 40 

33 58 

316 35 



500 00 
500 00 
250 00 
500 00 
250 GO 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 



Agents' Salaries. — Timber. 



Jae. F. Way 

J. A. G. Crozier . . 
J. B. Mc Williams 
Thos. E. Johnson. 
J. McDonald 



Agents' Postage. 



1). Anderson 

S. G. Best 

J. Bowker 

C. P. Brown 

A. S. Cadenhead. 
Jno. F. Day . . 
J. R. Dawson. . . . 
J. W. Fitzgerald. 
H. Hamilton . . . 

"W. Jackson 

Adam Kennedy . . 

J. ilahon 

T. McMiirray.... 
H. Mackay .... 
Alex. McNabb . . . 

J. R. Tait 

Aubrey White . . 
E. Handy 



Carried forward . 



500 CO 
250 00 


235 90 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 CO 


1,440 00 


500 00 


2,000 00 


1,600 00 


150 00 


16 60 


13 97 


5 84 


16 67 


5 40 


5 89 


12 48 


24 88 


23 98 


19 67 


8 19 


3 05 


26 49 


5 89 


31 33 


15 74 


78 50 


19 35 





$ cts. 



795 05 



7,485 90 



5,690 00 



333 92 



43 Yictoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 4.) 



A 1880 



APPENDIX No. ^.—Continued. 

Statement of the Gross Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the 

vear 1879. 



SERVICE. 



Brought forward . 



Inspections. 

S. G. Best 

Jno. F. Day 

J. R. Dawson 

J. Mahon 

E. Perry 

A.White 

E. Handy 

A. Shaw 

J. S. J. Watson 

Jno. Green 

D. F. McDonald 



Miscellaneous. 

Jno. F. Day, Stationery 

A. White, Expenses to Toronto 

Jos. F. Way, Disbursements 

Thos. E. Johnson, do 

J. B. McWilliams, do 

A. J. Russell, do 

J. Wilson, Timber Services 

C. E. Belle, do 

G. B. Cowper, Espenses Seizing Geo. Randolph's Raft . . . 

J. Shaw, do do 

E. Anderson, do do 

G. N. Matheson, do do 

W. J. Keays do do 

J. S. Thatcher, do do 

J. A. G. Crozier, Board at Toronto 

D. A. McDonald, Expenses seizing Crone & Baton's logs . 



Wood Hanging. 

J. Shaw 

J. W. Smith 

S. L. Soper 

J. B. Turgeon 

Geo. Bick 

J. Brady 

P. W. Freeman 

S. M. Johnson - 

A. G. Judd 

J. Kennedy 

T. W. Lee 

D. F. McDonald 

W. Russell 

J. B. Campbell 

A. "SVhite 

W. McGowan 

N. Crowe 

W. E. McLaughlin 

J. J. Gough 

J. Sharpe 

F. B. Day 

Carried forward 



S cts. 



5 20 

105 75 

7 35 

5 40 

54 70 

116 00 

4 50 

360 00 

16 00 

35 00 

559 10 



2 00 

20 50 
460 00 

73 50 
281 62 

52 18 
297 50 
100 00 

56 00 
136 61 

61 00 
217 00 

10 00 
112 90 

68 75 

85 00 



$ cts. 



1,269 00 



2,034 56 



],142 06 

1,007 09 

100 CO 

650 00 

1,186 73 

640 00 

1,101 30 

1,.591 58 

905 15 

6S0 40 

698 22 

1,193 63 

1,616 70 

415 00 

248 25 

40 00 

525 00 

4 00 

9 00 

225 37 

24 00 



$ cts. 



17,608 43 



14,003 48 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 4.) 



A. 1880 



APPENDIX No. ^.—Continued. 

Statement of the Gross Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the 

year 1879. 



SERVICE 



Brought forward 

Refunds 

Colonization Roads 

Surveys 

Contingencies. 

Printing and Binding 

Stationery 

Postage 

Fuel 

Fireman 

Night Watchman 

Advertising 

Subscriptions 

Extra Clerks, not on permanent list, paid out of contingen- 
cies 

Law costs 

Sundries 

Two per cent, of duties collected on timber cut on road 
allowances paid to Municipalities 

Board of Surveyors 



S cts. 



,162 06 
366 66 
825 00 
361 00 
547 50 
456 25 
83 95 
199 56 

.o08 33 
528 00 
275 20 



S cts. 



12,606 38 

110,04'J 72 

35,844 26 



10,313 .51 
753 31 
320 00 



§201,499 09 



THOS. H. JOHNSON, 

Assistant Commissioner. 



WILLIAM FORD, 

Accou7itant. 

Department of Crowx Lands, 

Toronto, 31st December, 1879. 



10 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 4.) 



A. 1880 



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43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 4.) 



A. 1880 



APPENDIX 

WOODS AND 
Statement of Timber and Amounts accrued from Timber Dues, Ground 









QUANTITIES AND DESCEIP 




Area 

under 

License. 




Saw Logs. 


i 


Oar Logs. 


Teebitoeies and 


White Pine. 


Other. 


Names of Agents. 


Square 
miles. 


Pieces. 


Stand- 
ards. 


Pieces. 


Stand- 
ard. 


Pieces. 


Ottawa Agency. 


7,202 
1,203 
7,679 


871,711 
728,117 
665,505 


i 

! 

708,454 2.703 


1,394 
3,127 


613 


Belleville Agency. 
J. F. Way, Agent 


416,470 
489,112 


6,314 








1 

1 


«rotal 


16,084 


2,265,.333 


1,614,036 


9,017 


4,521 


613 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



QUANTITIES AND DESCRIP 



Territories and 


Railway 

Ties. 


Hemlock. 


Maple. 


Cedar, 16 feet. 


Names of Agents. 


Pieces. 


Pieces. 


Feet. 


Pieces. 


Feet. 


Pieces. 


Inches. 


Ottawa Agency. 
A, J. Russell 


9,627 

8,578 






1 


43 


1 


Belleville Agency. 
J. F. Way, Agent 


146 




6,686 


17,995 


197,713 


Western Timber District 








1 

1 






1 1 


Total 


18,205! 14fi 


6,686 


1 


43 17M.f5i 197 713 















G. B. COWPER, 

Chief Clerk in Charge. 

Department of Crown Lands, 

Woods and Forests Branch, 

Toronto, 31st December, 1879. 



1.% 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (ISIo. 4.) 



A. 1880 



No. 10. 

FORESTS. 

Rent and Bonuses, during the year ending 31st December, 1879. 



TIONS OF TIMBER. 



White Pine. 


Red Pine. 


Boom and Di- 
mension Timber. 


Elm. 


Ash. 


Tamarac. 


Pieces. 


Feet. 


Pieces. 


Feet. 


1 
Pieces. ' Stand- 
ards. 


Pieces. 


Feet. 


Pieces. 


Feet. 


Pieces. Feet. 


29,049 


1,552,291 
125,211 
193,151 


16,096 


623,454 


15,335 
8,060 
9,896 


24,701 

8,145 

17,574 






6 

63 


231 
2,340 


6 


234 


2,093 


8 
22 


336 
1,141 




3,624 


117 


4,757 

















34,766 


1,870,653 


16,213 


628,211 


33,291 


50,420 


30 


1,477 


58 


2,571 


6 


234 



OF TIMBER, kc— Continued. 



TIONS OF TIMBER. 



Cordwood. 


Posts & 

Shingle 

Bolts. 


Round 
Cedar. 


Telegraph 
Poles. 


Amounts Accrued. 


Hard Soft 
Cords. Cords. 


Cords. 


Feet. 


Pieces. 


Trespass, Timber j Ground 
&c. Dues. 1 Rent. 

1 


Bonus. 


Total 


113 




29 

782 
1,616 


75,365 
15,312 


1,358 


$ cts. 
2,471 52 

2,211 28 

6,144 54 


$ cts. 
137,998 84 

67,313 28 


$ cts. 
14,761 00 

.^834 m 


S cts. 
1,971 24 

13 82 

12,696 57 


$ cts. 
157,202 60 

73,372 88 

112,319 21 


146 35 




79,018 10 14 460 no 










259 35 


2,427 


91,277 


1,358 


10,827 34 


284,330 22 


33,055 50 


14,681 63 


342,894 69 



THOS. H. JOHNSON, 

Assistant Commissioner. 



13t 



43 Yictoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 4.) 



A. 1880 



APPENDIX No. 11. 

Woods and Forests. 

Statement of Revenue collected during the year ending 31st December, 1879. 



$ cts. 1 S cts. 





77,161 35 
73,096 45 




« " McL Stewart 






150,257 80 




61.900 32 
1,391 55 


" " McL. Stewart 








63,291 87 
118,464 80 


Amount of Western Timber District collections at Department 

McL. Stewart 


115,167 34 
3,297 46 








332,014 47 



G. B. COWPER, 

Chief Clerk in Charge. 

Department of Crown Lands, 

Woods and Forests Branch, 

Toronto, 31st December, 1879. 



THOS. H. JOHNSON, 

Assistant Commissioner. 



14 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 4.) 



A. 1880 




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Sessional Papers (No. 4.) 



A. 1880 





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Sessional Papers (No. 4.) 



A. 1880 



APPENDIX No. 19. 

Statemen^t of Work performed in the Survey Branch during the year 1879. 
No. 
1. — 11 Instructions and Letters of Instructions for Surveys prepared and entered. 
2. — 12 Crowm Surveys examined, completed and closed. 
3. — 12 Surveyors' accounts for surveys audited and closed. 

4. — 11 Reports to CouncU relative to Municipal Surveys drawn up and entered. 
5. — 11 Instructions for Municipal Surveys prepared and entered. 
6. — 9 Municipal Surveys examined and confirmed. 
7. — 4 Plans of Mining Locations examined. 
8.- -93 Plans of Private surveys examined. 
9. — 78 Plans to accompany Instructions prepared. 

10. — 567 Plans compiled and copied, besides Plans of Townships reduced and added to 
the engraved Maps. 

11. — 510 Letters relating to Surveys prepared, written and entered. 

12. — 21 Letters relating to Mining prepared, written and entered. 

13.-2,139 Pages of Field Notes, &c., copied. 

14. — 81 Railway Plans and Books of Reference examined and certified. 

15. — 1,384 Patents issued during the year ending 31st December, 1879. 

Note. — The foregoing Statement does not account for the time spent in furnishing information to partiei 
applying personally at the Surveyor's Branch, who are unable to gain the information they require without 
assistance ; much careful research into the old correspondence, plans, field notes, and other documents being 
necessary in order to insure reliability in the information given, which is frequently used as legal evidence in 
courts of law in disputed cases. 



G. B. KIRKPATRICK. 

Department of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, 31st December, 1879. 



THOS. H. JOHNSON, 

Asiisiant Commissioner. 



24 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4 ) A. 1880 



APPENDIX No. 20. 

Statement of the Names of Candidates who have passed their Examinations before the 
Board of Examiners of Land Surveyors for Ontario during the year 1879. 

PRELIMINARY CANDIDATES PASSED. 



Fletcher Huffman. 
William Lyon Mackenzie. 
Norval Wardrop. 
Hugh McGrrandle. 



Eobert WHliam Coldwell. 
Walter Stanley Davidson. 
Daniel Leavens Sanderson. 
Ai-thur Jabez Van Nostrand. 



FINAL CANDIDATES PASSED AND SWORN IN AS PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYORS. 



Josiah Gershom Sing, 
Kichard Bh'dsall Rogers. 
Charles Edward Fitton. 
Alh-ed Edmund Morris. 
Clemens Dersteine Bowman. 



Ai-chibald Westmacott McVittie. 

George Ross. 

Richard Coad. 

John McKenzie Moore. 

John Duncan McNab. 



The Board of Examiners of Land Surveyors for Ontario meets at the Office of the 
Commissioner of Crown Lands, on the first Monday in each of the months of January, 
April, July and October in eveiy year, imless such Monday be a holiday (in which case 
it meets on the day next thereafter, not being a holiday). Section 0, chapter 14G, Re- 
vised Statutes of Ontario. 



PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION. 



All persons before they can be apprenticed to a Provincial Laud Surveyor must 
pass a satisfactoiy examination before the Board of Examiners in the following subjects, 
viz. : — ^Vulgar and Decimal Fractions, Extraction of Square and Cube Root, Practical 
Geometry, Euclid, Plane and Spherical Trigonometry, Mensm-ation of Supei-ficies, and 
the use of Logarithms ; correct Spelling and good Writing required. 



FINAL EXAMINATION. 

Final candidates, before obtaining a hcense to practise, imdergo a strict and search- 
ing examination before the Board of Examiners as to their proficiency in Euclid ; Plane 
and Spherical Trigonometiy ; Calculation of Areas by means of the Traverse Tables, 
&c.; Laying out and Dividing up of Land ; the Adjustment and Use of the Transit or 
Theodolite ; Astronomy, including the calculations necessary to determine the Latitude 
by meridian altitudes of the sim, moon or stars, or by double altitudes ; Method of 
determining Time ; of finding the time when any star passes the Meridian, with the 
time of its Elongation, Azimuth Angle and Variation of the Compass ; the Method of 
Keeping Field Notes ; Drawing up Descriptions by Metes and Bounds for insertion in 
Deeds ; taking Affidavits in the matter of disputed Boundaries ; the Law regulating 
Surveys ; Geology ; and also as to their proficiency as Draughtsmen. 

G. B. KIRKPATRICK. THOS. H. JOHNSON, 

Axsisfant Commissioner. 
Department of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, December 31st, 1879. 

25 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



APPENDIX No. 21. 



REPORT 



ON 



COLONIZATION ROADS AND BRIDGES, 

FOR THE YEAR 1879. 



To the Honom-able T. B. Pardee, 
Commissioner of Crown Lands. 

Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honoixr to present for your information, my rej)ort of the -works 
performed dming the year 1879, under the direction and management of the Colonization 
Roads Branch of yom- department : — 

I beg, in the first place, as a prehminary statement, to append a schedule of the 
detailed expenditure of the sum of S2,720yVo. referred to in the Recapitulation of my 
report for 1878, as the amoimt remaining in the hands of the Accountant of the Depart- 
ment of Crown Lands, for " cmTent works and balances of unsettled accounts" and 
which amount has since been drawn out and appUed in the manner above indicated, as 
follows : — 

Segum River Bridge (in McDougall) $500 00 

Perrault's Settlement Road 76 42 

Lispections 600 00 

Tamworth and Oso Road 51 50 

Peterson Road 32 22 

Monck Road 36 10 

Addington Road 62 12 

Mississippi Road 37 75 

Honora Bay Road 39 16 

Hagariy Road 51 93 

Eganviile and Fov Road 25 50 

Bm-k's FaUs Bridge 100 00 

Stisted Road 121 69 

Hagarty and Brudenel 50 50 

Lavant Road 61 50 

Combermere Bridge 770 21 

Parry Sound Road 20 53 

Rose and Lefroy Road 23 91 

Chaffey Town Line Road 56 66 

Draper Bridge 2 81 

$2,720 10 
26 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



I have now the honour to present to your notice a brief description of the various 
works of the year 1879 : — 

These works have been unusually numerous this season. The influx of settlement 
into the new Districts has nece?sitatecl an increase of road and bridge improvements, 
to accommodate in some degree the wants of the settler:^. 

I now proceed to enumerate the works of the past year with the amounts expended 
on each, as follows : 

NORTH DIVISION. 

1. Base Line Road. 

Two and a half miles of this ^ine have been completed in a thorough manner, extend- 
ing from section No. 32 in Korah, through section 36, in the township of Prince. The 
road has been ditched, heavily brushed and covered. ^ 

Expenditure $1,038.35. 

2. Base Line Branch. 

This branch runs a mile north of the above road. The work done this season in from 
one half mile east of Prince and Korah town line west three and a half miles. The road 
is graded, ditched and turnpiked, and extends to the west side of sections 27 and 34 in 
the township of Prince. 

Expenditure, S500. 

3. Batchawaung Road. 

The work on this road was commenced at section No. 3, in the township of Penne- 
father, thence in a northei^ly direction through the township of Fenwick, and a short dis- 
tance into the township of Tupper. 

The whole length of road made this season, is eight miles and twenty -three chains. The 
land passed through, for the most part, is a tamarac swamp, and comprises mainly, the 
flats of Goulais River. The Indian Department contributed $1,000 towards this work. 

Expenditure, $2,078.64. 

4. Bruce Mines Road. 

This road has been repaired throughout its entire length. Seven miles have been 
-wrought over. This road connects with the Great Northern road, at Thessalon River. 
Expenditure, $280.00. 

5. Otter Tail Lake Road. 

This line extends from the bridge at the head of Otter Tail Lake, in a northerly 
direction through the township of Plummer, into the township of Galbraith. It opens up 
several good tracts of land. Five miles of new road have been built this season. 

Expenditure, $750.00. 

6. Rock Lake Road. 

This road branches off from the last named road near Otter Tail Lake, and runs in a 
north-westerly direction between Rock and Desert Lakes. 

It opens a valley of good land lying between the above lakes. 
Three miles of new road have been made this season. 
Expenditure, $450,00. 

7. Rose and Lefroy Road. 

Ten miles of this road have been repaired. Two miles of new road have also been 
made in connection herewith, on the town line between Lefroy and Plummer, forming an 
outlet for certain settlers to the Rose and Lefroy roads. 

Expenditure, $353.10. 

27 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



8. Rose and Lefroy Road Bridge. 

This bridge is situated on the above road where it crosses the Thessalon River, be- 
tween sections 11 and 14 in Lefroy. The bridge is 144 feet long, supported by king post 
truss. 

In connection ^vith this bridge on either side of the river about one mile of road has 
been made. 

Expenditure, $250.00. 

9. Bridge in Lefroy. 

This is another bridge across the Thessalon River, situated about three miles above 
the one last described. 

This bridge is 119 feet long and 46 feet in span, also supported by a king post truss. 
Expenditure, 8150.00. 

10. Campmext d'ocrs Road (St. Joseph Island). 

The expenditure here has been made in opening the line between Cons. D and E, from 
the Centre Road to Campment d'Ours Island, as a winter road. 
Expenditure, $520.35. 

11. Gore Bay Road (Manitoulin Island). 

This line has been opened and made passable between Gore and Providence Bays. 

It forms a very impox'tant connection between the north and south shores of the Is- 
land of Manitoulin. 

Seventeen and a half miles of new road have been made this season, and two and a 
half miles of the old road have been repaired. 

Expenditure $1933.17. 

12. Great iSToRTHERN Road. 

Eight miles of this road have been repaired this season. The work was commenced 
at Desert Lake and extends westerly over the above distance. Ditching, grading, re- 
moval of boulders, and repairs of crossways form the principal improvements. 

Expenditure, $669.47. 

13. HoNORA Bay Road. 

This road is a connecting one between Little Current and Gore Bay Roads. 
Seven miles and a half have been opened for travel this year. The Indian Depart- 
ment contributed $350 towards this work. 
Expenditui-e, $700. 

14. Hilton or Centre Road (St. Joseph Island). 

Some three miles of this road have been opened this season, leading towards Hilton 
Road proper. 

Expenditure, $501.32. 

Killarney Road. 

About four and a half miles of this road have been opened in a north-easterly 
direction. 

The road passes through rough, rocky land, but leads in the direction of a fine tract, 
distant from the village about ten miles. It also affords access to certain beaver meado-wg 
where the settlers procure their hay. 

Expenditure, $593.85. 

28 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



16. Kaministiquia Road. 

The overseer on this line has opened the road through to the Murillo Station, on the 
Canada Pacific Railway. 

Four and a half miles of new road have been built, and the remainder of the line, 
about seven miles, improved and made passable to the above station. 

Expenditure, $995.70. 

17. Little Current Road. 

Five and a quarter miles of this roadhav^ been substantially repaired. Some heavy 
hills on the line have been graded down, and a good portion of crossway side-ditched and 
covered. 



Expenditure, §864.92. 



18. Manitowauning Road. 



Twelve and a half miles of this road have been repaired this season, from the villat^e 
of Manitowauning towards Michael's Bay. 

This road passes through a large tract of good land, and is the great highway from 
the above village to the south shore of the island. 

Considerable additional repairs have also been made on the southerly portion of 
this road by R. A. Lyon, Esq., M.P.P., at his own expense. 

Expenditure, $523.10. 

19. MuDGE Bay Road. 

This is a short connecting road between the above named Bay and Lake Kao-awon». 

It opens up accommodation between the above points for the settlers to grist and 
sawmills, store and post office. It opens also a fine tract of land. The timber on the line 
was very heavy, and the work expensive. The distance of road made is two and a half 
miles. 

Expenditure, $780.27. 

20. MiLFORD Havek Road. 

This is a projected road from the town plot of Hilton to the above-named harbour, on 
St. Joseph Island. 

Five hundred dollars were granted last fall to be expended in cutting out the tim- 
ber from the line, in order that certain destitute settlers, whom it was reported were in a 
starving condition, might be given labour and wages to aid them under such circum- 
stances. See report of last year. 

Expenditure, $250. 

21. Oliver Road. 

This is an important leading road commencing at Prince Arthur's Landing, in the 
Thunder Bay District. The line runs in nearly a direct course through the Township of 
Mclntyre, to the intersection of the townline between Oliver and Mclntyre, with the line 
between the fir.st and second concessions of Oliver. 

The distance wrought over has been in all about ten miles, seven of which has been 
completed as a waggon road and three have been chopped and cleared of timber sufficient 
for a winter road. 

The corporation of Prince Arthur's Landing contributed one hundred and thirty-four 
dollars towards the building of one half mile of road within the bounds of the village be- 
ing one half the cost of the said half mile. 

Expenditure, $2,977.31. 

29 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



22. Port Lock Harbour Road. 

This line commences at Port Lock Harbour, west of Bruce Mines some seven or 
eif^ht miles, and runs northward towards Mud and Desert Lakes. The road has been 
opened as far as the south end of the Mud Lake, a distance of about four miles. 

The main object of this road is to afford accommodation to the settlers in the vici- 
nity of Desert Lake to reach the Port Lock Harbour direct. 

Expenditure, $1,260.24. 

^ 23. Pigeon River Road. 

This road has been improved in some considerable degree throughout its whole dis- 
tance, thirty miles, or from the Kaministiquia to Pigeon Paver, the boundary of the 
Province of Ontario. 

The improvements consist of crossways over all the small streams and wet swamps, 
brushing and clearing the line and removal of fallen timber. 

A large amount of work has been done, and the road is now -fit for winter mail 
travel. 

Expenditiu-e $981.70. 

24. Saxfield Bay Road. 

This line leads from Manitowanning Road to Manitou Lake. The Avhole distance is 
now opened. 

Five and a quarter miles have been made this year, affording access to the mills on 
Manitou Lake. 

ExpencUture, S542.10. 

25. Tenby Bay Road. 

Five miles of this road have been constructed, commencing at Hilton Town Plot, and 
extending southward. This is the same line which was called at fir.st " Milford Haven." 
It was found subsequently more advantageous to settlement, to diverge this road from the 
Haven at the U concession line south-westward towards Tenby Bay, and hence the name 
of the road is changed to Tenby Bay. 

Expenditui'e, $696.39. 

26. Thessalon River Road. 

This road commences at the outlet of Thessalon River, at Diament's mill, and ex- 
tends up the said river a distance of five and a half miles. 

Tliis improvement affords a veiy large amount of convenience to the settlers in Lefroy 
and Rose and Kirkwood, giving them access to mill and store at the mouth of the river. 
Of the amount expended, the Indian Department contributed $500, towards the works. 

Expenditure $1,056.18. 

WESTDIVISION. 
Ahmik Lake Road. 

Three and a half miles of this road, or its total length from the northern road to the 
above lake, have been repaired. 
Expenditure, 8250. 

2. Armour Road. 

This line has been extended this season a further distance of three and a half miles. 
The road now reaches within three-fourths of a mile of Pickerel Lake in the above town- 
ship. 

The work is described as tolerably well done. 

Expenditure $1,001.87. 

30 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



3. Burk's Falls Bridge. 

This bridge spans the north branch of the Maganetawan River. It is a well-built 
king-post truss bridge of 60 feet span. The Ontario Junction Railway location crosses 
close to this point. 

There is also an excellent mill site here. This will probably, for the above reasons, 
shortly become a place of more than ordinary importance. 

Expenditure $648.59. 

4. Bethune Bridge. 

This is a structure built on what is called the Kearney Branch Road. The bridge is 
located on the town line between the townships of Bethune and Proudfoot, where it is 
intended the above branch road shall cross the stream. 

It (the bridge) spans the south branch of the Maganetawan. It is similar to the 
Burk's Falls bridge, except in the piers, which are greater in altitude. 

Expenditure $800. 

5. Brunel Road. 

The part of this road embraced in the expenditure, extends from the commencement 
of this road on the Muskoka road, at the village of Utterson, and extends to Port 
Sydney, on Mary's Lake, and on the southward from thence to the Brunei bridge, which 
crosses the north branch of tlie Muskoka River just below Mary's Lake. 

The distance repaired is three miles. The work is well done, and the road is now in 
excellent condition for ti^avel. 

Expenditure, $349.12. 

6. Christie Road. 

This road has been repaired in all the more dilapidated sections from its commence- 
ment on Parry Sound Road for a distance of fourteen miles eastward, towards the Rosseau 
and Nipissing road. 

The improvements have been judiciously made. 

Expenditure $1,036.18. 

7. Cardwell Road (New Branch). 

This branch settlement road diverges from tho Cardwell road proper on the town 
line between Cardwell and Stisted, and extends, in a north-westerly course, into the town- 
ship of Monteith. 

Four miles and twelve chains of new road have been made in a very superior man- 
ner, besides some very necessary repairs to the older portion of the road opened last year 

Expenditure $945.87. 

8. Cedar Narrov/s Bridge. 

This bridge is built at the outlet of a small lake, which empties into Trading Lake 
upon the Bobcaygeon Road. This bridge is built in a very superior manner. It is built 
sufficiently high to admit the small steamer that plies between a mill situated some dis- 
tance above it and the village of Baysville, about two miles below the western end of the 
Lake of Bays. 

The bridge is 200 feet in length ; the span is 60 feet, and is supported by a king post 
truss. 

Expenditure, $1,052.25. 

9. Dalton and Washago Road. 

This line is now completed from its commencement on Muskoka Road, near the Vil- 
lage of Washago, to the Victoria Road in the township of Dalton. Four miles have been 
made this year. 

Expenditur.e, $982.97. 

31 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4 ) A, 1880 



10. Eagle Lake E,oad. 

This is a new road leading from the Rosseau and Nipissing road to the narrows of 
Eagle Lake, in the Township of Machar. The length of the line to the Narrows is 
seven mUes. 

Two miles of this distance, from the Pwosseau and Nipissing road, is grubbed and 
graded as a summer road ; the rest of the distance, five miles, is only chopped out and log- 
ged, and formed as a winter track. 

Expenditure, $1,081.09. 

11. Eagle Lake Bridge. 

This bridge was built by contract. 

It is built across the Narrows alluded to in the foregoing work, and forms an entire 
length of 361 feet. 

There is a span of 40 feet over the deep water portion of the narrows. The rest of 
the distance on either side of the span is passed on a series of framed bents or tressel 
wol"k, well braced and strongly hand railed on both sides throughout the entire length. 

Expenditure, $800. 

12. Fourth Con. Line (Brunel). 

This line has been opened from the Port Sydney Road, a distance eastward of three 
and a half miles. 

The first two miles of the above distance are very well completed. 
The last one and a half miles are not so well finished. 
Expenditure, $500. 

13. GuRD Road. 

This road has been prolonged this season a distance of six miles and twenty-eight 
chains. It reaches now to lot 34 in the Township of Himsworth. 

The whole length of line now opened is about eleven and a half miles, from Com- 
manda Creek on the Rosseau and Nipissing Road to the above lot 34. The road built 
this season is of a very superior character. 

The road now extends to the east side of the South River ; a bridge over which is 
very much needed by the settlers. 

Expenditure, $1021.92. 

14. Gravenhurst and Baysville Road. 

This is a new road located in 1878. It leads from a point about two miles west of 
Baysville Village, on the Macaulay Road, southward through the townships of McLean 
and Draper, and is intended to connect with the roads south of Peterson Road so as to 
form a nearly direct line to the village of Gravenhurst. 

Thirteen miles of the line have been opened. Ten miles of this distance is new road 
and three miles are distances taken up on settlers roads lying in the same course. These 
last have been improved. 

The line has been only completed as a winter road. 

Expenditure $1,012.73. 

15. Indian Peninsula Road. 

This is a line of road opened through the townships of Eastnor and Lindsay, near 
Colpoy's Bay, to assist the settlers in the Indian Peninsula, in the County of Bruce. The 
statute lines have mainly been adheied to. Seven miles have been worked over and 
made fit for travel this season. 

Expenditure, $800.81 

32 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4) A 1880 



IG. Junction No. 1 Road. 

The easterly end of this road from its junction with Rosseau and Nipissing road in 
the township of Spence, has been improved westward a distance of tour miles. 
The work is tolerably well done. 
Expenditure, $580.24. 

17. Kearney's Branch Road. 

This road branches from the Perry and Monteith road, at Kearney Post Office, in 
Perry, and extends northward towards the town line between Bethune and Proudfoot, 
where the new Bethune bridge, formerly described, crosses the Muganetawan River. 

Only one-and-a-half miles of this road ai-e graded and tinishecl. A further distance 
of two or three miles has been chopped out, but that portion is at present useless for 
travel. 

Expenditure, $999.62. 

18. Katrine Bridge. 

This bridge is built over the south branch of the Maganetawan River, on the Armour 
road. It is similar to the bridge built at Burk's Falls. It is an excellent structure and 
has been gratefully received by the settlers as an immens3 boon to that section of the 
country. 

Expenditure, $876.40. 

19. MusQuosH Road. 

Considerable repairs have been effected on this line which had been urgently peti- 
tioned for the past two years. 

The part improved is from the sixth mile post from G-ravenhurst to Glnn Orchard 
post office, a distance of eleven miles and a half. The repairs are very well performed 
considering the great distance passed over and the limited amount expended. 

Expenditure, $806.20. 

20. MusKOKA Road, No. 1. 

Permanent repairs have been made upon this road, reaching from the village of 
Bracebridge past the junction of the Parry Sound Road, a distance of six miles. In this 
distance a great deal of heavy hill work has been done. 

The hills are very numerous on this part of the road, and a very superior improve- 
ment of them is reported by the Inspector. 

The road is also heavily graded throughout the distance, and substantial culverts 
placed wherever needed. 

Expenditure, $3,541.53. 

21. MusKOKA Road, No. 2. 

The Muskoka Road has been further extended this year through new lands from 
Burk's Falls to the boundary of Strong, a distance of four-and a-half miles. 

The road has been built upon " Specification No. 2, improved," and is reported by the 
Inspector to be very well done indeed. 

Expenditure, $1,226.69. 

22. Muskoka Road, No. 3. 

The improvement under this head consists mainly of several deviations made from 
the old line to avoid high, rocky, and very difficult hills. Two and three-quarters miles 
of nearly all new road have been thus made, forming a very essential improvement. The 
hills are all north of Huntsville, and chiefly in the township of Chaffey. 

Expenditure, $1,266.46. 

4 83 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. Ih80 



22. MOXTEITH AND PeRRY RoAD, No. 1. 

This road has been repaired from Rosseau and Nipissing Road eastward over the 
distance of eight miles. 

The repairs are comparatively of a superficial character owing to the small sum ex- 
pended and the great distance wrought over. 

They are, however, reported to be judiciously made, and render this part of the road 
very passable for teams. It was formerly all but impassable. 

Expenditure, $528.60. 

24. MoNTEiTH AND Perry Road, ISTo. 2. 

This road has been extended for two and a half miles further eastward into the 
township of Bethune. 

The work was commenced at Kearney Post Office, and was prolonged into the new 
township of Bethune. 

Very many settlers have moved into this township last year, and the line upon which 
this road is built is represented as being located far in advance of the terminus of the road. 

Expenditure, $497.20. 

25, Macaulay Road. 

The Macaulay road has been prolonged a further distance toward the Cedar Narrows 
in the township of Ridout. The terminus of the work now reaches to the south side of 
St. Mary's Lake, within three miles of the Narrows. 

^ Four miles have been built this season. The work is reported to be exceedingly 
well done. 

Expenditure, $990.03. 

26. Mills Road. 

This road branches from the Northern road at lot 27, in the 10th concession of Ferrie. 
It proceeds from the above point in a northerly direction through the township of Mills, 
crossing Wolf River at lot 24, in the 3rd concession of the last named township. Eight 
miles of the line have been opened, reaching four miles beyond the river. 

The road has been well made, but the location is described as being exceedingly hilly 
and rough. 

A bridge is imperatively required over Wolf River. 

Expenditure 82,012.87. 



27. Maganetawan Road. 

s sho 
er. 
Expenditure $254.54. 



About one mile of this short road has been repaired between Rosseau and Nipissing 
Road and the Distress River. 



28. Nipissing Extension Road. 

Six miles of this line have been wrought over ; commencing at South River, and ex- 
tending easterly towards South-East Bay. Two-and-a-half miles of the above distance is 
completed as a wagon road. The remaining three-and-a-half miles is only brushed out as 
a winter sleigh track. 

The Avork is described as tolerably well done. 

Expenditure $501.01. 

29. Northern Road, No. 1. 

Permanent improvements have been made on this road over a distance of three miles 
and foui-t^en chains. This distance lies southward of the village of McKellar. 

The improvements embrace first a deviation from the latter point of sixty chains in 
length. ^ •' 

34 



43 Yictoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



Oil tliis deviation there are two trestle bridges, one, one hundred and eighty feet 
long, and anotiier sixty-six feet long. The second deviation is forty chains in length. On 
it there is one log bridge sixty feet long. 

Some repairs have also been made over abaab three miles of the roal still further 
southwai'd. 

The above distance of three miles and fourtaen chains have been heavily ditched and 
graded, and supplied with thirty-.six culverts. 

Expenditure $3,191.78. 

30. Northern Road, No. 2. 

The repairs made under this head embrace a distance of twelve miles on the Kosseau 
and Nipissing end of the line. Tn-.y cjnsisfc of thd baildin^ ot" tliree log bridges, clearing 
brush and some side ditching. Some crossways also have been improved. 

Expenditure ;§550. 

31. North-West Road. 

This road has been extended four miles f urthar towards Sliawanaga. These four 
miles liave been well completed. A farther distance of three-quarters of a mile have been 
brushed out. 

Expenditure, S937.33. 

32. Orange Valley Road. 

This road begins on the Rosseau and Nipissing Rjai, in the 5th concession of the 
township of Spence. 

It has been opened in a westerly direction three and a half miles. 
The road is reported as tolerably well made. 
Expenditure, $974.63. 

33. Otter Lake Road. 

Two and a half miles have been built on this line, extending- southwai'd from the 
operations of last year. 

The work is reported to be very well performed. 
Expenditure, $421. 

3-1. Port Vernon Road. 

This line leads southward from the Village of Port Vernon, at tiie head of Vernon 
Lake, in the Township of Stisted. The road has been extended a distance of two miles 
through new lands. iVo miles, also, of the old road near the village have been repaired. 

Expenditure, $695.51. 

35. Port Sydney and Muskoka Road. 

This is a line leading direct from the boat landing, at the foot of Mary's Lake, to the 
Muskoka Road, which it enters about a mile south of Utterson. About two miles of the 
line have been repaired. 

One and a half miles of this distance is continuously repaired and the remaining half 
mile in the worst places. 

The object of this road is to atford more direct accommodation to ])oat passengers to 
Bracebridge. 

Expenditure, $224.98. 

36. Parky Sound R,oad. 

The repairs made this season are on the easterly division of this road, between Ros- 
seau Village and the Muskoka Road Junction. 

Eight miles have been improved. Two miles from Rosseau have been permanently 
repaired, and the remaining six miles have been made passable. 

Expenditure, .$1997.02. 

3o 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



37. Poverty Bay Road. 

This road commences at the Maganetawan Village, on Rosseau and Nipissing Road, 
and leads to some settlements westward in jthe township of Croft. 
About three-and-a-half miles have been opened. 
Expenditure, $1007.47. 

38. Peninsula Road. 

The Peninsula Road in the township of Medora, has been prolonged two miles 
further. Tlie work is reported as being well done. The line now reaches to within a 
short distance of the north town line of Medora. 

Expenditure, $507. 

39. Port Sydney Road. 

This road has been prolonged about half-a-mile aloag the shore of a small lake south 
of Stephenson town line, and also through a tamarac swamp. 
Expenditure, $189.47. 

40. Rosseau and Nipissing Road. 

About seven miles of permanent repairs have been made on this road, reaching to 
within a short distance of Commanda Creek, in the township of Gurd. 

Besides these permanent repairs, improvements were made southward, from the Maga- 
netawan, over the worst parts of the road, a distance of eight miles. 

Expenditure, $4,179.03. 

41. Seguin River Bridge. 

This is a bridge constructed over the Seguin River on the Macdougall road It is a 
good king-post bridge of 60 feet span, built by contract. 
Expenditure, $250, balance of account. 

42. Stephenson Road. 

This road has now been opened from the Muskoka Road to the west bay of the Lake 
of Bays. 

Five miles have been built this season completing the line to the above point. 
The work is reported as being well performed. 
Expenditure, $1,029.56. 

43. Stephenson Bridge (repairs). 

Some very important repairs have been made on this structure. 

The water had undermined the easterly pier and wing wall to a very serious extent. 
The east bank is composed of running sand, and it has been found very difficult to secure 
it against damage. 

The improvements to the bridge this season are the best and most permanent yet 
efiected. 

Expenditure, $335. 

44. South River Bridge. 

This bridge is consti'ucted over the south river on the Rosseau and Nipissing road. 
The total length of this bridge is 200 feet. The main span is 80 feet in length and is sup- 
ported by an excellently framed queen post truss. 

The whole structure is reported as finished in a superior and workmanlike manner. 

Expenditure, $1,145.00. 

36 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4 ) A. 1880 



45. Stisted Road. 

Five miles and three-quarters of this road have been repaired. The repairs were 
taken up this season where they ended last year, and were continued to within a short 
distance of the south town line of McMurrich. 

The work is reported as being satisfactorily done. ' 

Expenditure, $497.88. 

46. Sinclair and Chaffey (Town Line Road). 

This work lies between a point called Maud Broad, on the above line, and Winters 
settlement. 

Some three miles of the line have been improved making a passable road between 
the above points. 

Expenditure, $256,28. 

47. Scotia Road. 

This is a short but important piece of road, for the convenience of the settlers in 
Perry and Bethune to reach McGill's grist and saw mill in Perry. 

The line branches from the Monteith and Perry Road at Kearney's Post Office, and 
leads soutwurd to the above mills. 

Two and three-quarters miles have been made in a satisfactory manner. 

Expenditure, $500. 

EAST DIVISION. 

1. Addington Road, No. 1. 

The overseer has gone over a very long distance on this road. 

He has repaired fifteen miles, commencing at Cloyne Post Office, and terminating at 
Massanoga Bridge. 

The work is reported as tolerably well done, and the road is described as being in a 
very passable condition throughout. 

Expenditure, $1,021.88. 

2. Addington Road, ISTo. 2. 

Four and a half miles of that part of this road, lying north of Madawaska bridge 
have been improved. 

The work was commenced at the Peterson Road intersection, and was prolonged south- 
ward over the above-named distance. 

A log bridge, about one and a half miles north of the Madawaska River, which had 
been destroyed by fire, was also rebuilt. 

Expenditure, $825.56. 

3. Addington Road, No. 3. 

Nine miles of this road were also repaired southward from Cloyne Post Office, and 
are reported as very well performed. 
Expenditure, $447.57. 

4. Admaston Road 

Under the above head twelve miles of road have been repaired on the road leading 
from Renfrew to Douglas, commencing three miles west of Renfrew and ending one mile 
east of Douglas. 

One log pier bridge has been built within this distance, two hundred and fifty feet 
long. Besides the above work, two-and-a-half miles of the line between lots 18 and 19, 
across the 6th and 7th concessions, have been substantially repaired, making in all four- 
t^6n-:,">ii.'-^-' 1 miles of road repaired this season. 

Expenditure, $997.45. 

37 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



5. Algoxa and Hagarty Road. 

This work is clone first on the line between the second and third concessions of the 
township of Hagarty, viz : — from lot eight eastward to townline. Again, the same line 
continued in Algona on the Eganville Road two miks further eastward. 

Altogether, four miles. 

Expenditure, $481.71. 

6. BOBCAYGEOX RoAD, No. 1, 

Tlie work on this road is done in two sections. 

First, Commencing at the village of Kinmount and extending to the village of Min- 
den, twelve miles, and 

Second, commencinsr at lot 20, in the township of Stanhope, north of the Peterson 
Road, and ending at lot 30 in the same township, two-and-a-half miles, in all, fourteen-and 
a-half-miles. 

This work is reported as being well done, especially the greater distance, between 
Kinmount and Minden. 

Expenditure, $2,051.79. 

7. BOBCAYGEON ROAD, No. 2. 

Some repairs have also been made south of Kinmount Village. 

Seven miles have been improved on this section by grading, drainage, and repairs of 
crossways. 

Expenditure, $272.02. 

8. BucKHORN Road. 

Repairs have been made on this road in the north part of Harvey and the southerly 
part of Cavendish. 

Two-and-a-half miles have been improved, including in the same distance thirty -three 
rods of crossways. 

Expenditure, $225.62. 

9. Barrie Road. 

The work here was commenced three-and-a-half miles from the AdJington Road, or 
at the terminus of last year's work. Two-and-a-half miles were opened. The grading of 
the road is not nearly completed. 

Expenditure, $450.91. 

10. Bagot Road. 

This improvement was commenced at the boundary line between Bagot and McNabb 
thence westerly along the northerly bank of the Madawaska river, or what is called the 
Old Madawaska Road, nine and three-quarter miles. Two-and-a-qiiarter miles of the road 
are reported as being exceedingly rough and stony, and expensive to improve. 

Expenditure, $815.93. 

11. Burleigh Road. 

Sixteen miles of this line, from Monck road, southward, have been partially repaired. 
The work consisted of repair of broken crossways, grading and drainage. 
Expenditure, $769.10. 

12. Chandos Road. 

Five miles of this road have been repaired, commencing at the Burleigh road, with 
■which it connects, thence eastward toward Crow river, the present terminus of the road. 
Eighty-two rods of crossway were also built within the above distance. 
Expenditure, $430. 

38 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



13. Ca:jerox Road. 

The repairs on this road were commenced at the village of Coboconck and extended 
from thence two miles. 

Then again commencing at Moore's Falls, they wei-e carried through to the villagt. 
of Minden. This litter distance is twelve miles, making in all ft total distance of four- 
teen miles repaired. 

Expenditure, $999.49. 

14. OoBDEN' Road. 

The work on this road this season consists, 1st, of three and a quarter miles of gravel- 
ing. From Cobden Village westward, two miles have been gravelled, and again from 
the village of OceoJa one and a quarter miles. 

2nd. Three miles, in addition to the above distances, have been repaired by grading, 
drainage, etc. ; six and a half miles improved in all. 

Expenditure, $1,000.64. 

15. Garden Road. 

About 6 miles of this road have been repaired. 

The road follows mainly the line between the 8th and 9th concessions. 
Considerable work on the above distance has been done across a beaver meadow, 
where the road has been heavily ditched and gravelled. 
Expenditure, $150. 

Besides the above work 6 miles of another line were rejDaired in the same township. 
Expenditure, $150. 

16. Denbigh Road. 

This I'oad begins on lot 20, Addington Road, in the township of Denbigh. The 
course of the road from this point is in a north-easterly direction. 

Four miles of the line have been opened this season, The work is tolerably well 
done and generally well graded. 

Expenditure,' $1,046.04. 

17. Deer Lake Road. 

This road is in the township of Carvliff. 

It commences on the Monck Road on lot 16 in the 12tli Concession. It passes 
from thence in a north-easterly direction to the 21st concession, thence north-westerly 
through the said concession to the boundary of the township, and along the boundary 
west to lot 18, ten miles. 

The road has been improved throughout. Some deviations have been made from the 
old line. 

Expenditure, $477.71. 

18. Fkontexac Road. 

The repairs on this road were commenced at the Village of Parham, a Post Office on 
the line thii-ty miles south of the Mississippi River. From Parham, for three miles, 
substantial and continuous repairs have been made. 

On the north end, from Mississippi River for one mile southward, a piece of new 
road lias been made ; a deviation from the old line to avoid several rocky hills. Between 
the end of this distance and the three mih^s repaired on the southerly end, slight repairs 
have been made throughout the wdiole distance. 

Expenditure, $800.57. 

19. Glamorgan Boundary Road. 

Repairs were made on a part of this boundary commencing at Monck Road and 
proceeding northward. 

39 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



The main improvement is a long ci'ossway over a wet tamarac and cedar swamp. 
This swamp is one hundred and thirty-five rods across, and is distant from the Monk 
Road forty rods. 

About one half of the crossway is covered with clay. Whole distance repaired 
something over half-a-mile. 

Expenditure, $202.27. 

20. Hastings Road. 

The overseer of this road work commenced at the distance of two miles south of 
TJmfraville. These two miles were well repaired. 

Then from Umfraville a deviation was made from the old line to avoid some very 
heavy hills. 

This deviation was three miles long, and is an entirely new road. 

Total distance improved, five miles. 

Expenditure, $1,000. 

21. HORTON AND RoSS ROAD. 

The improvements on this road were commenced one mile south of the town line 
between the townships of Morton and Ross, and extend north-westerly two miles. The 
line is described as being exceedingly rough, broken by frequent ravines. 

Pier log bridges were built across two of these. The work is reported as being well 
done. 

Expenditure $750. 

22. Hag ARTY Road. 

There are but two-and-a-half miles miles of this road repaired, on the town line 
between Brudenel and Hagarty. 

The work is reported as being well performed, and of an expensive character. 
Expenditure $803.89. 

23. Hagarty and Brudenel. 

Seven-and-a-quarter miles of the above so-called road, which is really a section of the 
Opeongo road, have been repaired. 

The work was commenced one-half mile west of the Peterson Road Junction in the 
ownship of Brudenel, and was extended eastward over the above distance. 
The improvements are reported as being very well performed. 
Expenditure $845.14. 

24. Junction Road. 

This is a line opened between the Frontenac Road in the township of Clarendon, 
eastward to a station on the Kingston and Pembroke Railway. 
Seven miles have been opened and improved. 
Expenditure $425.22, on account. 

25. L'Amable Bridge. 

This bridge is on the Hastings Road, near the Jerman Mills. 

The old bridge, built some twenty years ago was rotted completely away. A good 
substantial structure has .been made. It is 109 feet long, supported by framed bents 12 
feet high, covered with 4-inch pine plank, with good hand-rail on either side. 

Expenditure $244.57. 

26. McXabb Roads. 

The work under this head consists of some repairs done to a number of short settlers' 
roads, in the above township, to the extent of three miles and three-quarters in ali. 
Expenditure $489.68. 

40 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (IN o. 4.) A. 1880 



27. MoNCK Road, No. 1. 

Six miles of this road have been very well repaired this season, commencing at the 
Victoria Road, and extending westward to the close of the work of last season. 
Expenditure $1,120.65. 

28. MoNCK, No. 2, Road. 

These repairs have been made from the 16th lot of Cardiff westward, over a distance 
of seven miles, extending to within about half a mile of the Burnt River. 
Expenditure, $320.05. 

29. MiNDEN Road. 

This work consists of the opening of six-and-a-half miles of the above road from its 
intersection with the Peterson Road to Gull river crossing between Green and Maple lakes. 
The road has been well made. 
Expenditure, $947.45. . 

30. Mississippi Road. 

Certain improvements have been made on this road, over a distance of twenty-eight 
miles. The work was commenced at the intersection of the Addington Road and carried 
eastward. 

The first five miles of this distance were thoroughly repaired, seven miles were re- 
paired in the worst places, and over the last sixteen miles the broken crossways only were 
mended. 

Expenditure, $816.56. 

31. Massanoga Bbidge. 

This is a long log pier bridge on the Addington Road where it crosses the Narrows 
of Massanoga lake in the township of Abinger. 

It has been entirely renewed under a contract this season. 

The bridge is 315 feet long. It is guarded by a strong hand-rail on either side and 
covered with flatted timber. 

Expenditure, $550. 

32. Methuen Road. 

The entire length of this road has been partially repaired, from its commencement on 
the Chandos road to its termination southward at Sand lake. 
Expenditure, $303.26 on account. 

33. Perth Road. 

Two and-a-half miles of this road have been substantially repaired commencing at 
Loboro' lake extending northward. 

Expenditure, $539.18. 

34. Perrault Settlement Road. 

These repairs were commenced at the intei'section of the above road with the Opeongo 
road and were carried northward over three and-a-half miles. 

Expenditure, $839.50. 

35. Petewawa Bridge. 

This is a contract work. 

The Petawawa Bridge is a very important structure. It is a combined Howe truss 
and queen post bridge, built eighteen years ago. 

The main span of this bridge is 1 20 feet. 

Some of the chord timbers are decayed. To secure the bridge for three or four years 
longer, a solid cut-water pier has been built under the chords at the centre of the span. 

4] 



48 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



The work is reported to be well done and effective for the preservation of the bridge for 
a few years. 

A part of the roadway of the bridge was also repaired with new planking. 

Expenditure, $250. 

36. Petersox Road. 

This work was commenced at the distance of five miles west of the Hastings road. 

From this point a new road has been opened. The old road ran over a succession of 
abrupt and high hills. The new road deviates to the southward and is a superior road. 

It reaches to within two miles of the lands of the Canada Land and Immigration 
Company. 

Expenditure, $1,000. 

37. Pembroke and Mattawan Road. 

These repairs were begun three miles west of the village of Pembroke, and were 
carried over a distance of three miles. 

They are reported as being substantially and well made. ■ 
Expenditure, $1,267.60. 

38. Sydexham and Fermoy Road. 

This work was begun in the township of Loboro' about three miles north of the vil- 
lage of Sydenham. 

The improvements were continued northward to the village of Fermoy, a distance of 
seven miles. 

They are reported as well and substantially done. 

Expenditure, $527.23. 

39. Shamrock Road. 

This is really a part of the Opeongo Road. The section repaired under the above 
head is locally known as the Shamrock Road. 

The repairs were commenced at the village of Sliamrock and extended eastward to 
Renfrew village, a distance of eleven miles. 

Expenditure, $750.89. 

40. Staxhope Road. 

This short road is considered as a branch of the Bobcaygeon, in the township of Stan- 
hope. It commences to the north of the Peterson Road and terminates on lot 10, in the 
4th concession of the above township, a distance of 3 miles. 

Expenditure included in Bobcaygeon Road No. 1. 

41. Tamworth Road. 

The work on this road was commenced at the distance of two miles north of the vil- 
lage of Arden. The improvements embrace a distance of two miles. It appears from the 
Inspector's Report that this work is a deviation from the old line to avoid hills. The 
road is consequently a new one in this part. It is reported as being well done. 

Expenditure, $804.26. 

42. Victoria Road. 

The repairs on this line were commenced about two miles south of the Monck line 
intersection, and were extended northward a distance of four miles. The work has been 
very well performed. It has consisted mainly of grading, ditching, and crossway 
covering. 

Expenditure, $507. 

42 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



43. Victoria Bridge. 

This bridge is built across the Black River, on the Victoria Road, a short distance 
south of the townline of Dalton. It is 156 feet long, and 16 feet wide. The main span 
is 60 feet long, supported by a well-framed king post truss, with diagonal and lateral 
braces. The chords are bolted and the truss frame bolted and plated throughout. The 
flooring is of flatted timber, and the approaches are covered with flatted cedar. A strong 
hand rail extends throughout, on either side. The piers rest on solid rock foundations. 

Expenditure, ^679. 

44. York River Bridge. 

This is a new bridge built across the York Branch of the Madawaska River, on the 
Hastings Road, to supply the place of the old one, constructed about eighteen years ago. 

The bridge is 136 feet long. The span is sixty feet clear. The two abutment piers 
are 16 and 13 feet high, respectively, built of square white pine tied in each round. They 
are filled with stone. The approaches are respectively 50 and 26 feet, covered with flatted 
cedar. 

Expenditure, $783.12. 

SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE ON COLONIZATION ROADS IN 1879. 

I. 

North Division. 

1. Base Line Road $1,038 35 

2. " " Branch Road 500 00 

3. Batchawaung " 2,078 64 

4. Bruce Mines " 280 00 

5. Bridge in Lefroy " 150 00 

6. Campment d' Ours " 520 35 

7. Gore Bay " 963 77 

8. Great Northern " 669 47 

9. Hilton " 501 32 

10. Honora Bay " ". , 700 00 

11. Killarney " 493 85 

12. Kaministiquia " 995 71 

1.3. Little Current " 864 92 

14. Manitowaning " 523 10 

15. Mudge Bay " 780 27 

16. Milford Haven " 250 00 

17. Oliver " 2,977 31 

18. Otter Tail Lake " 750 00 

19. Port Lock " 1,260 24 

20. Pigeon River " 981 70 

21. Providence Bay " 969 40 

22. Rock Lake " 450 00 

23. Rose and Lefroy " 353 10 

24. Rose and Lefroy Bridge ■ 250 00 

25. Sanfleld Bay Road 542 10 

26. Tenby Bay " 696 39 

27. The.ssalon " 1,056 18 



IL $22,596 17 

West Division. 

1. Ahmik Road $250 00 

2. Armour " 1,001 87 



Carried forward $1,251 87 

43 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



Brought forward $1,251 87 

3. Burk's Falls Bridge " 648 59 

4. Bethune " 800 00 

5. Brunei Road 349 12 

6. Christie " 1,036 18 

7. Cardwell " 945 87 

8. Cedar Nairows Bridge 1,052 25 

9. Dalton and Washago Road 982 97 

10. Eagle Lake " 1,081 09 

11. " " Bridge 800 00 

12. Fourth Con. Brunei Road 500 00 

13. Gurd " 1,021 92 

14. Gravenliurst and Baysville Road 1,012 73 

15. Indian Peninsula " 800 81 

16. Junction No. 1 " 580 24 

17. Kearney Branch Road , 999 62 

18. Katrine Bridge 876 40 

19. Muskoka No. 1 Road 3,541 53 

20. " " 2 " 1,226 69 

21. " " 3 " 1,266 46 

22. Monteith and Perry No. 1 Road 528 60 

23. " " " 2 " 497 20 

24. Musquosh " 806 20 

25. Macaulay " 990 03 

26. Mills " 2,012 87 

27. Maganetawan " 254 54 

28. Nipissing Extension " 501 01 

29. Northern No 1 " 3,19178 

30. " "2 " 550 00 

31. Northwest " 937 33 

32. Orange Valley " 974 63 

33. Otter Lake " 421 00 

34. Port Vernon " 695 54 

35. Port Sydney and Muskoka " 224 98 

36. Parry Sound " 1,997 02 

37. Poverty Bay " : 1,007 47 

38. Peninsula " 507 00 

39. Port Sydney and Bays\dlle " 189 47 

40. Roesseau and Nipissing " 4,179 03 

41. Stephenson " 1,029 56 

42. Scotia " 500 00 

43. South River Bridge 1,145 00 

44. Stisted Road 497 88 

45. Stephenson Bridge ■ 335 00 

46. Seguin River " 250 00 

47. Town Line Chaffey Road 256 28 

III $47,253 76 

East Division 

1. Addington No. 1 Road $1,021 88 

2. " '= 2 " 825 56 

3. " "3 " 447 57 

4. Admaston " 997 45 

5. Algona and Hagarty " 481 71 

Carried forward $3,774 17 

44 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



Brought forward $3,774 1 7 

6. Bobcaygeon INo 1 Road 2,051 79 

7. " "2 " 250 00 

8. Buckhorn " 2-;0 00 

9. Barrie " 450 91 

10. Bagot " 815 93 

11. Burleigh " 800 00 

12. Chandos " 400 00 

13. Cameron " 999 49 

14. Cobden " 1,000 64 

15. Garden " 300 00 

16. Denbigh " 1,046 04 

17. Deer Lake " 477 71 

18. Frontenac " 800 57 

19. Glamorgan and Monmouth Road 202 27 

20. Hastings " 1,000 00 

21. Horton and Ross " 750 00 

22. Hagarty " 803 89 

23. Hagarty and Brudenel " 845 14 

24. Junction " '. 425 22 

25. McNabb " 489 68 

26. Monck No. 1 " 1,120 65 

27. Monck No. 2 " 320 05 

28. Minden *' - 947 45 

29. Mississippi " 816 56 

30. Massanoga Bridge 550 00 

31. Methuen Road 300 00 

32. Perrault's Settlement Road 839 50 

33. Peterson " 1,000 00 

34. Petewawa Bridge 250 00 

35. Pembroke and Mattawan Road 1,267 60 

36. Perth " 539 18 

37. Sydenham and Fermoy " 527 23 

38. Shamrock " 750 89 

39. Tamworth " 804 26 

40. Victoria " 507 00 

41. Victoria Bridge 679 00 

42. York River " 783 12 

43. L'Amable " 244 57 

$32,165 27 
RECAPITULATION. 

1. North Division $22,596 17 

2. West " 47,253 76 

3. East " 32,165 27 

4. Inspection and Locations 3,639 68 

5. Balances of 1878 6,248 94 

$111,903 82 

No. of miles of new road made 240 

No. " " " old roads repaired 379.1, 

No. " large bridges built 16 

No. " " " repaired, 2 

J. W. Bridgland, 
Department of Crown Lands, Supt. of Col. Roads. 

Toronto, 31sb December, 1879. 

45 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



SUIiyEYORS' REPORTS. 



Appendix No. 22 

DISTKICT OF PARRY SOUND. 

Township of Mowat. 

Sarnia, Ontario, 

November 12tli, 1879. 

Sir, — I have the honour to report that m accordance with yoiu- instructions, dated 
17th June, 1879, I have completed the sm-vey of the township of Mowat. About the 
17 1 h June, I pioceedcd by way of Colhiigwood and Georgian Bay, to the moutii of French 
River, thence by tug steamer to the east boundary of Mowat, where I commenced work. 
Having surveyed tliis hne myself last year, I made it the base of the survey, and ran the 
easterly concessions and side hues, carrying the work northward to French River. I then 
carried up the western part, winding up the survey at the north-west corner of the town- 
sliip on French river. 

All that portion of the township lying south of concession line 10 and 11, 
and north between side line 30 and 31 and the west bomidary to French River 
may be described as buriat country, and rather below the average, although 
souie fine tracts occvu* in the vicinity of the Key and Portage Lake. The timber 
is principally scrub pine and poplar, white bu-ch, balsam, etc. The balance of 
the township to the noi-th of concession line 10 and 11 and east of side line 30 and 31, 
will compare favourably with any land in the Parry Sound District. The soil being 
principally clay, with occasional patches of sandy loam, fully two thu'ds of this portion be- 
ing well suited for agricultural purposes. 

The timber being black bu'ch, pine, hemlock, balsam, maple, etc. The only j)ine 
of any consequence in the township is to be found along both sides of the Pickerel river, 
extending about a mile inland. 

TUere are but few lakes in this township and none of any importance. 

On the whole I think it will, before long, be one of the most important townships in 
the District. The good land f a-ming one unbroken chain with that of Rlair and McCou- 
key, and affording room for a largti and prosperous settlement. 

The terminus of the G. B. Branch, Canada Pacific Railway, will be someAvhere in 
the vicinity of side line 5 and 6, Concesssiou 17, South of the Pickerel river. 

The only clearing found was about six acres on Kidd's location. 

I would recommend that sufficient land to the west of Kidd's location, be reserved 
for a town plot. 

I have the honom- to be. Sir, 

Your obedient sei-vant, 

Thos. Byrne, 
Provincial Land Surveyor. 

The Honom'able T. B. Pardee, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 

Toronto. 

46 



Sessioual Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



•• Appendix A'o. 23. 

Township of Wallbridge. 

Parry Sound, Ontario, 

December 3vd, 1879. 

Sir, — I have the honour to report that under mstructions from your office dated 
June lltb, 1879, to subdivide the townsbip of Wallbridge into farm lots, I proceeded to 
said township about the middle of June, and after locating my supplies at different points 
along the Maganetawan River, I commenced said subdivision by chaining and postino- 
tbe south boundary frum the south-east augle westward to side line ten and eleven, where 
I observed Polaris on the night of the 26th, on eastern elongation, and ran said side line 
on a course N. 20° 61' 40" W. Ast., and continued my work, carrying the belt between the 
east boundary and the Indian Reserve northward to the north boundary, which I found 
had been run by P. L. S. B}Tne ; thence westward, using the north boundaiy as my 
base, and carrying along all that part lying between the Maganetawan River, (which is 
the north boundary of the Indian Reserve) and the north boundary of the townshii) 
as far as side line thirty-five and thu'ty-six, which was as far as Mr. Bp-ne had carried 
the north boundary. Here I observed Polaris on the niglit of August 18th, and continued 
said north boundaiy westward to the Georgian Bay, thence working southward, and 
finishing my survey the last of September. 

Tiie tdwnsliip uf Wallbridge contains but a small percentage of good land, there only 
being about ten thousand acres in the South-east corner, and a few hundred, but in 
small pieces, along the Naiscootyong River that are tit for settlement, or where a settle- 
ment could be formed. This part of the towaiship is well timbered with hard- wood and 
pine of a good quality, the soil being generally a good sandy loam, but in places clay. 
The remainder of the township has all been burned over and the timber destroyed, but 
has since grown up with small brush. There is a clearing of about thirty acres of o-ood 
land on lots fifteen and sixteen, in the fiftii concession, another on lots thirty-three 
and thirty-four, in the fourteenth concession, containing fifteen acres, and another 
containing ten acres on lots forty- six and forty-seven, in the fourteeonth concession 
at the outlet of Still River. These clearings have all been made by persons in the 
employ of the Maganetawan Lumber Company, and are occupied by said Company. The 
greater part of the township is drained by the Maganetawan River, which enters the 
township on the east side, in the fourth concession, and empties into Byng Inlet, oppo- 
site the most easterly of the Maganetawan Lumber Company's Reserves. Byi;g Inlet 
opens up from the Georgian Bay at the north-west corner of tlie townsliip. The Mat^an- 
etawHU Lumber Company has two large saw-mills situated on the Inlet and employ 
about two hundred men. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

David Beatty, 
The Honourable T. B. Pardee, Provmcial Land Surveyor. 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



Appmdix Xo. 24. 

DISTRICT OF NIPISSING. 

Township of Butt. 

Dublin, Ontario, 

December 9th, 1879. 

Sir, — In accordance with instructions received from you dated the twelfth day of 
Jmie, 1879, to proceed to and sm-vey the township of Butt, in the district of Nipissing, 

47 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



into farm lots of one hundred acres each, I commenced the sm-vey on the tenth day of 
July, by measuring fi-om the south-west angle of the township, northerly along the boun- 
dary between the townships of Proudfoot and Butt, the depth of the first and second con- 
cessions. I then ran the line in the centre of the road allowance between the second and 
third concessions on the required course of north 69° 8' 20" east, to the centre of the road 
allowance between lots numbers five and six, making the_^lots twenty chains in width and 
the road allowances one chain iu width. I then ran the line ui the centre of the road 
allowance between lots numbers five and six the depth of the second and first conces- 
sions to the boundary between tlie townships of McCraney and Butt. I then ran the 
line in the centre of the road allowance between the townships of McCraney and Butt 
westerly from the line between lots nrmibers five and six to the boundary between the 
townships of Butt and Proudfoot, I ran the boundai-y between the townships of Mc- 
Craney and Butt, westerly from the side line between lots numbers five and six, because 
the ground v. as so rough and broken at the south-west angle of the township, as to 
make it very difficult to run a coiTect line from that point. I ran the boundaiy between the 
towusLips of McCraney and Butt, easterly from the side line between lots numbers five 
six,and the hne between the second and third and the line between the fourth and fifth conces- 
sions easterly to the east boundary. I also ran the side road lines between each fifth and sixth 
lot and the east boundary across those four concessions. I then ran the east boundary 
across the fifth and sixth and seventh and eighth concessions. I then ran the hue be- 
tween the sixth and seventh concessions and the line between the eighth and ninth con- 
cessions, westerly to the west boundary. I also ran the difi'erent side road lines across 
those four concessions. I then ran the line between the tenth and eleventh concessions, 
and the line between the twelfth and thirteenth concessions, easterly to the east bomidary. 
I also ran the side road lines and the east boundary northerly from the hne between the 
eighth and ninth concessions to the north boundary. I also chained the north boundary 
and planted the posts for the lots fronting on it. 

I ran all the lines in the centre of the road allowances. I planted posts of the re- 
quired dimensions and of the best timber which I could conveniently obtain at the cor- 
ners of the lots at the distance of fifty links on each side of the line in the centre of the 
concession road allowances, with the numbers of the lots and concessions marked on 
them. I also planted posts on the line of survey with the numbers of the lots marked on 
their east and west sides, as guides to the lot posts. 

In carrying out this stuwey I have conformed closely with the Instructions. 

The township of Butt is very much broken with hills and rocky ridges. The soil 
is Fand anJ sandy loam. There are a great many small lakes in the township. The 
timber is principally birch, maple, balsam, beech, pine, cedar and tamarac. The pine is 
a good deal scattered, there not being a sufllcient quantity of it together to make it valit- 
able for lumbering purposes. 

There is a m;U site with a fall of about twenty feet on the south branch of the Ma- 
ganetawan Paver, on lot nttmber five on the ninth concession. 

The best land is in the second, third, fourth and fifth concessions. There is a good 
deal of swamp along the east boimdary, and in the north-east portion of the township. 

The land in general in this township, owing to its hilly surface and light soil is not 
as well adapted for the growth of grain, but is better suited for grazing and stock-raising 
than the land in the adjoining townships on the south and west. 

I met with no stratified rocks during the survey. The fixed rock is granite and it is 
covered in a great many places with only a few inches of soU. 

The water ritns west in the west portion, soyth in the south-east portion and east 
in the north-east portion of the township. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient sei-vant, 

J. J. McKenna, 
The Honourable T. B. Pardee, Provincial Land Surveyor. 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 

48 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



Appendix Xo. 25. 

Township of Paxton. 

Mount Fokest, Ontario, 

November, 1879. 

Sir, — I have the honoiu* to submit to you my final report oii the survey of the 
township of Paxton, surveyed imder instructions from yoiu' department, dated the 12th 
day of June, 1879. 

This tOAvnship is situated in the district of Nipissing, and is bounded as follows : on 
the south by the new townsliip of Butt ; on the west by the township of Joly, in the 
district of Pan-y Soimd ; on the north by the new township of Ballantyne ; and on the 
east by the imsm-veyed lands of the Crown. 

As instructed, I commenced the sui^vey at the south-west angle of the township, and 
after an observation of Polaris, I ran the south boimdary north 69'' 08' 20" east a dis- 
tance of three himdi-ed chains laying off the different lots, with then- respective widths of 
twenty chains each, numbering them fi'om west towards the east, also allo-ning for the 
road allowance one chain m width between every fifth and sixth lot. From this point I also 
retraced the easterly boundary of Joly and at the proper distance la\ing off' the concession 
line between concessions two and three, parallel with the south boimdary, also on these hues 
giving each lot its proper mdth, and allowing for the road allowance. I also checked with the 
side lines rimning fi'om the south bomidary between lots -5 and 6, and lots 10 and 11, at right 
angles to the boundaiy. I continued the work in this manner imtil I reached the north 
boundaiT. I then retm'ned towards my south boundary, rimuing the lines between lots 
20 and 21 and extendiug the different concession lines to the side hne between lots 25 
and 26. Upon reaclihig my south boundary, I extended it to the east boundary, laying 
off the lots and side Hnes as before. On reaching the hne between lots 30 and 31, I 
moved northerly on this Hne, at the same time rimning the hne between lots 25 and 26, 
extending the chflerent concession hnes to, and lamning the east boundary as well as the 
line between lots 30 and 31, and finishing the township at the north-east angle. 

I also siu-veyed the different lakes as I met with them diu-iug the progress of the 
sm*vey. This township might almost be said to be situated directly on the height of land, 
\di\i the north branch of the River Maganetawan having its head waters in the different 
lakes at the south-west part of the township, and running thi-ough the township of Joly, 
on the east and thence to Georgian Bay. The south river with two branches, one rising 
almost at the south-east angle of the township and joining the other branch which runs 
along the north part di'aining the north-east angle and north part, and empties into Lake 
Nipissing, and the Petawawa River, rising in the lakes on lots 16, 17 and 18, in conces- 
sions 3 and 4., thence almost dh-ectly along the side road between lots 15 and 16 to con- 
cession 1, where it is joined by the outlet of the lake on lots 12, 13, 1-1 and 15, and con- 
tinues along this concession leaving it on lot 22. 

Owing to the cause mentioned above, the coimtiy is considerably broken by swamps 
and rocky ridges. A considerable amount of land tit for agricultmal piu-poses is foimd 
between these swamps and ridges, probably from thirty to forty per cent, of the whole 
township. The soil is good, being of a light sandy loam. 

Regarding the land fit for agricultui-al iDm^poses, the township may be divided into 
tliree sections almost similar to the divisions on the timber plan : 1st. A section includ- 
ing the first block in concession 1 and 2 ; then north-easterly to the small lake at the 
north-east angle of lot 15, concession 4 ; then following the concession line between tliia 
concession and concession 5, until the west branch of the South River is met ^vith ; then 
along the river to the west boundary of the township, and including that part between 
tliis boundary and the river. This section will contain about fifty per cent, of good land, 
timbered with beech, maple, balsam, black bnch, and an occasional white jjine ; the 
timber is cedar and spruce in the swamps ; there is also a thick growth of maple under- 

4- 49 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



brush ou the high lauds. This block will contain about 20,000 acres. 2nd. A section 
including all that part of concessions 1, 2, 3, and 4, not mentioned in section 1. Also 
all between the two south-westerly branches of the South River ; of this section, I might 
say about twenty- five per cent., will be good land, timbered with maple, bhch, spruce and 
a considerable amount of pine, generally small : in the swamps, spruce, balsam, with 
alder brush. 3rd. A section including the remainder of the to-\\Tiship. In this section 
the timber is chiefly pine, mixed with birch and balsam, and a smaller amount of maple 
than in the other sections. A considerable amoimt of the pine has been blown down. 
Not above ten per cent, of this section can be said to be fit for settlement. 

O^ving to the countrj^ bemg so much broken by rocky lidges, it will be impossible to 
make roads on the proper road allowances. 

The best means of getting into the townsliip at present is from Kearney, then by canoes 
up the South Maganetawan River, and across Sand Lake to the side line between lots 15 and 
16, in the township of Proudfoot, then along this line to Grass Lake, about three miles. 
With very httle labom* a very good waggon road can be made along this hne between 
these two lakes, from Grass Lake to within 3 miles of the south-west angle of the town- 
ship and also the east end of Long Lake. 

Owing to the small lakes and short portages there is comparatively Httle trouble 
over-the remaining 3 miles to the south-east angle. I cut a veiy good trail when going 
into the sm'vey. 

This route w^ould do very well for a settler beginning, and I am told a very good 
road can be got from the north side of Sand Lake through the township^ of Proudfoot 
along the south side of Long Lake to this township, but I never passed through the 
coimtry myself. 

I have the honom- to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

James K. McLean, 
Provincial Land Surveyor. 
To the Honourable T. B. Pardee, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 

Toronto. 



Appendix No. 26. 
Township of McCraney. 

Prescott, Ontario, November iStk, 1679. 

Sir, — I have to report that in accordance with your instructions to me, dated[ 
Toronto, June 12th, 1879, appointing me to survey the township of McCraney into farm 
lots. I commenced work thereon the last week in June, comj^leting the field work the 
latter pai-t of September. 

Finding on the ground that the south boundary of Bethune did not coincide with 
the north boundary of Pinlayson, I commenced the survey by producing the eastern 
boundary of Bethune from its south-easterly corner to its intersection with the north 
boundary of Finlayson, there estabhshing the south-west corner of McCraney ; fr-om there 
chaining easterly along the aforesaid north boundary, I determined No. 5 and G side line ; 
from thence, rimnmg northerly, I laid off the various concessions and side-road lines, as 
shewn on the accompanying plan and field notes. 

■ .The township of McCraney contains within its area the head waters of the two main 
branches of the East River, the westerly branch taking its rise from the north-eastern 
portion of the township in Rainy and Island Lakes, while the easterly one in reahty com- 
mences at Moose Lake. The coimtry along both branches,and in thefr immediate vicin- 
ity, is mostly a high hard- wood region, while in the north-east comer, and along the lakes 
the surface of the land is not so broken. 

50 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



Moose, Rainy and Island are the principal lakes, and the water in all three is clear 
and generally deep. Moose Lake has, in some places, hard, sandy shores, while the 
others are rocky ; fish abound, salmon trout of a large size being readily taken. Many 
of the smaller lakes and ponds are formed by beavers of which there are evidently a num- 
ber. Dams (some of a large size and recent construction) are on nearly every stream 
and hold back a large amount of water in many places. 

The two branches of East River are the principal streams. The westerly and long- 
est branch is much broken by rapids, and is generally shallow, the bottom in most places 
being a coarse gravel. The east branch may be said to lose itself in Moose Lake, as 
only small streams enter the lake from the different valleys, &c. I noticed two mill sites 
on the west branch, one on Lot 6, concession 2, and another on Lot 5, conces-sion 4. 

The principal ranges of hills occm: along the two branches, and in many places 
attain considerable elevation. The whole township is, however, generally speaking, hilly 
and broken. 

The township is generally a hard-wood one, the only pLae occurring in and about 
the various lakes, and this neither large nor of superior quahty. Birch and maple pre- 
dominate, and some fine tracts of these exist. 

The soil is mostly a sandy loam, and the smface generally stony, but many fan* 
tracts of arable laud can be obtained. 

The township is, I think, well adapted for stock-raising, and I have no doubt hay 
and the coarse cereals can be profitably raised. 

I should recommend a road to be made to enter the township fi'om Bethune on the 
10th and 11th concession, thence following a concession hue bearmg through the town- 
ship. This would, I consider, render the best laud at once available for settlement. I 
cannot refrain from expressing my surprise at the manner in which this section of the 
country has settled up since 1874, in most part due to the wise and judicious selection 
and construction of the different colonization roads traversaig it. Large clearings and 
comfortable homes now exist where I remember the native forest, and as fine fall wheat 
was cut in the township of Perry this year as I have often seen in Western Ontario ; 
this may be due in part to a favom'able season, but I think the soil is, in many cases, 
more suitable to its growth than has hitherto been supposed. 

I consider about two-thirds of the township fit for settlement. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Yom- obedient servant, 

Chas. F. Chapman, 

Provincial Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable T. B. Pardee, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands. 

Toronto. 



Appendix No. 27. 

Township of Ballantyne. 

Fenelon Falls, Ontario, 

December 8th, 1879 

Sir, — I have the honour to inform you that I have completed the survey of the 
township of Ballantyne, in the district of Nipissing, in accordance with instructions from 
the Department of Crown Lands, dated 14th Jime, A.D. 1879. Said survey being com- 
menced on the 21st of July, 1879, and completed on the 1st of November following, 
and beg leave to submit the following report, together with the field-notes and plan thereof. 

I commenced the survey at the south-west angle of the township and ran the south 
boundary on an astronomical course N. 69' 8' 20" E. to near the east side of lot 
number 16, making each lot twenty chains wide, leaving fifty links for a road east of the 

61 



43 'Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



line nm in tlie centre of the road allowance on the east side of the township of 
Laurier, and one chain for road between lots 5 and 6, 10 and 11, and 15 and 16. I then 
went first into the interior of the township on the hne between lots 10 and 11, filling in 
as I went all between the west boimdary and lots 15 and 16 and running the latter line. 
I carried the same range of lots to the north boimdary before going further east into the 
township and connected my line between lots 5 and 6 with the south boundary of the 
Township of Himswoith making each concession up to 13, fifty chains and leaving one 
chain for road between concessions 2 and 3, 4 and 5, 6 and 7, 8 and 9, 10 and 11, and 12 
and 13. 1 found concessions 13 and 14 to contain llS^Vo chains, which I divided in the 
centre, making each of them 59t'o3o chains. I then ran the north boundaiy, the line be- 
tween concessions 12 and 13, and also between 10 and 11, to the east boundary, filling in 
as I went, the side lines. I then produced the hues between lots 20 and 21, 25 and 26, 
30 and 31 and the east boundary south, as far as Kah-wah-was-kig-omog Lake and filling 
in the concession lines, and then took up the south boundary at the jjoiot I left it on 
lot 16, and produced it to the east botmdaiy filUng in M'hat was left, between it and the 
lake. 

The soil is princii^ally sandy loam with clay, or clay subsoil in the flats, and mostly 
rolling, there being few level spots oi any great extent, some pretty high liills, but no 
regular chain of mountains, in any given direction. I did not find much land in any 
one place entnely fi"ee from stones, or much of what might be called first-class land, but 
there is a large quantity of what might be called fan land, on which industrious settlers 
can make a good hving. Most of the land on the south boundary, east of lot 25, is fan*, some 
veiy good. Concessions 2 and 3, fifom lot 5 to lot 10, and 15 to 20, fair ; concessions 
4 and 5 from lot 1 to lot 6, and also from Wah-was-kig-omog Lake to east boimdaiy, 
good; concessions 6 and 7, from lot 5 to 10, from lot 15 to 25, and also from 30 to 
34, very fair ; concessions 8 and 9, all good land; concessions 12 and 13, from lot 5 to 
20, good, and the north boundary, very fan land, except fi'om 6 to 20 and 80 to 24. 

I should say, uj)on the whole, there is forty per cent, of the township adapted for 
settlement, while most of the balance will make good pasture lands. None of the 
Bwamjis are of very great extent, nor are any of them very wet. 

The timber is mostly bui-ut along the south boundaiy as far east as lot 15, but it 
only extends a few chains into the towusliip, and there are clumps of green wood, mostly 
pine, all along it. Of the hardwood timber, the prevailing is, black bnch, not very large, 
next maple, then beech, with a few basswood and black ash, there is also a good deal 
of hemlock, but not much cedar, with a dense growth of underbrush, all over the town- 
ahip, composed of balsam, hazel, groimd hemlock, alder and mountain ash, with 
small tamai'ac in most of the swamps. 

The township contains also a large quantity of very superior white pine, both large 
clean and sound. The south-west corner contains the most and also the largest variety, 
with fine groves round most of the lak^is, and scatteiing large trees nearly all through the 
hardwood, but I fear that should a fire break out in the townshij) before it is cut, a large 
part of it will be destroyed, as the gromid is hterally covered, especially in the pineries, 
with lying, half rotten, timber. 

As I found no trace of wuid-falls or former fires, except as above stated, on the west 
part of the south botmdaiy, I am at a loss to account for so much lying timber, it seems 
simply to have decayed and fallen down. 

^pAfljglThe rocks are composed altogether of gneiss and granite; the prevailing rock is gneiss. 
Heretofore I have invariably found gneiss dipping to the north-east, but in Ballantyne the 
dip is invariably to the south-east. I found no trace of limestone, or any kind of mineral 
and not more than about 4 degrees of local attraction. 

The township is well watered by lakes of clear spring water, and fine creeks. Most 
of the smaller lakes contain large speckled trout, while the larger contain both speckled 
and salmon trout, and in Wah-was-kig-o-mog Lake are also large white fish, besides 
those above mentioned. Lake Wah-was-kig-omog is evidently the som'ce of the Amable 
Du Fond Eiver. The river between it and Wah-was-kig-o-mog, is a fine stream, averaging 
nearly sixty Hnks in width, and at low water, when I saw it, about two feet deep, mth a 
slow current, down to the hne between the lots 20 and 21, fi'om which, to the lake, it is a 
series of falls and rapids, with a fall altogether, of not less than thirty feet, with rocky 

52 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4 ) A. 1880 



bottom and bants, making an excellent mill site. Wah-was-kig-omog Lake ex- 
pands into what is evidently a larger lake, immediately east of Ballantyne, emptying 
towards the north-east into Manitou lake, by a river only a few chains long. The lakes 
are all very deep in proportion to their size, except Wah-was-kig-omog, which is shallow 
with a sandy bottom. Crystal Lake is so clear that the bottom can be distinctly seen at 
a depth of twenty feet, it has neither an inlet nor outlet, but I think it must empty by 
some undergrotmd channel into the pond on lot 9, concessions 6 and 7 ; neither has 
the small lake in lots 4 and 5, concessions 6 and 7, any visible outlet, but it is ten 
feet liigher than the one immediately east of it. 

All the lakes in the north-east quarter of the township, I was informed by Lidians, 
empty into Manitoii lake. There is another good mill site at the outlet of Kah-kas-ah- 
mick Lake, A\ith a fall of about ten feet. I traversed all the lakes with a micrometer. 

I apprehend that the north paii will be most readily settled from the township of 
Himsworth, and the south, through Joly, while the Amable Du Fond Kiver affords an 
easy means of access from the east. 

There being no settlers or improvements in the township, no inspection returns are 
required. 

I have the honour to be, Sh-, 

Your obedient servant, 

James Dickson, 
Provincial Land Siirveyor. 
The Honourable T. B. Pardee, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 

Toronto. 



Apptndix No. 28. 

Township of Finlayson. 

Fenelon Falls, Ontario. 

March 25th, 1879. 

Sir, —I have the honour to inform you that I have completed the survey of the 
townsliip of Finlayson, in the District of Nipisshig, made mider instructions from the 
Department of Crown Lands, dated 2nd May, 1878, said survey having been commenced 
on the 29th July, 1878, and completed on the l-lth February, 1879, and I beg leive to 
submit the following report, together with the field notes and plan thereof: 

I commenced the survey at the south-west angle of the townshiii, and measured from 
thence easterly along the north boundary of the township ot McClintock, a distiiuce of 
100 chains, planting, as I went, lot posts at every 20 chains, at a distance of 50 links 
north of the line, and also guide posts to the lots on the line itself. 

At a distance of 50 link3 east of the south-east angle of lot 5, and also 50 links north 
of the centre of the boundary, I took an observation on the eastern elongation of Pol iris, 
and commenced the line between lots 5 and G on a true astronomical course, N. 20' 51' 
40" W., and ran it a distance of 100 chains to the north end of the second concession, 
and laying off 50 links for half the allowance for road between concessions 2 and 3, ran 
from thence the line between said concessions on a true course, N. G9^ 8' 20'' E., and at 
the intersection of this line with the line between lots 15 and 10, 1 took another observa- 
tion in order to verify my work. Tiie details of these obsorvations, as well a3 others 
taken during the progress of the survey, will bo found in their proper place in the returns 
enclosed. On these two lines, viz., the side line between lots 5 and G, and the line 
between concessions 2 and 3, I based the wliole of my work, running the concession 
lines both east and west from the Hne between lots 5 and G, and the side lin s north and 
south from the line between concessions 2 and 3. But for the sake of un'jrmity in the 
field notes returned to the Departmant, thi side lines read straight t':.ough from the 

53 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 

south to the north boundary, and the concession lines from the "west to the east 
boundary. 

The distances across lakes where not shewn as having been ascertained by triangula- 
tion, were measured on the ice. 

By referring to the field notes and plan, you will perceive that I intend concession 2 
shall be the proper depth, viz., fifty chains, and the broken lots which have been occa- 
sioned by crooks in the south boimdary, all in the 1st concession. 

The soil is j)rincipally either sandy loam or sand, varied by clay in a few places, and 
nearly all less or more stony, and nearly all undulating, with some few high and steep 
hills and bluffs. I cannot say that there are any continuous chains of hills in any 
given du-ection, even along the rivers and arotuid the lakes. 

I did not find any great extent of good land in any one place, but along the west 
boundary, and as far west as lot 16, and as far north as the 10th concession inclusive 
the land is very fair. There are also a few very fair lots in the 14th concession 
near the west boimdary, and tracts of good land nearly all along the north boundary, 
the best being near the north-east corner of the township. There is also in the south-east 
corner some very fair land, and along sidelines 30 and 31, and also alongside lines 35 
and 36 north of the North Eiver, and extending to the East Eiver. 

Upon the whole, I should say that fully one-third of the township is adapted for 
settlement, besides large tracts well adapted for pastm-age. 

By reference to the plan, you will perceive that there are a considerable number of 
swamps, swales and marshes, but none of them are of any great extent, and although 
there are a good number of beaver in the township, I foimd no beaver meadows, and very 
few beaver ponds, the animals being mostly what are known as " bank beaver," located 
along the deep pools on the rivers, and instead of building houses, burrow in the banks, 
where the streams have httle or no cmi-ent, sinking then* winter food in the water in 
front of then holes or bun-ows. 

By reference to the " timber map " enclosed, you will see that the greater j)ortion of 
the townsliip is timbered with hardwood, and that the pine is mostly around the lakes 
and along the streams. It is also of the variety known as "white pine," excej)t a. very 
small quantity of small redpine, along the south haK of the east side of Fatty's Lake. 
The largest and best quahty I saw is in the seventh and eighth concessions, and between 
side lines 6 and 6 and 10 and 11 and extendhig a short distance into the 9th 
concession, besides what [is shewn as pine timber on the " timber map," there is scat- 
tering pine nearly all through the hardwood. I cannot form any proper estimate of the 
quantity of good pine in the township, but I should say what I have seen will average 
about two clear and one knotty log of 13 feet long and sixteen inches in diameter, to the 
tree. Eespecting the other timber, the larger poriion is black bu-ch, next maple, then 
hemlock and beech. I found no elm and very Uttle basswood or ash. Cedar is also 
scarce, mostly of an inferior quahty, and confined to a few places. There is a great 
quantity of balsam, and a dense undergrowth of hazel, etc., more esj)ecially around the 
water, which impedes the progress of the work very materially. 

The rock is composed wholly of gneiss and granite, dipping as I have invariably 
found it, to the north-east. StrilvC, south-east by north-west. I met with no hmestone, 
nor any ajipearauce of any mineral whatever, not even u-on, and very httle local attrac- 
tion of the magnetic needle. There is very httle quartz or feldspar ; the rocks are 
mostly gneiss. I collected a few geological specimens at the beginning of the sm-vey, 
but as there was nothing whatever interesting in them, nor anything which could not be 
picked up at random on any granite liill, I threw them away. 

By refen-ing to the plan, you will perceive tbat, although there are a large number 
of lakes, none of them can be called large. I did not personally ascertain whether there 
are fish in any excej^t Camp Lake, and Lake Tasso, but in these we found very fine 
salmon trout, and I learned h'om trajDpers that all the others, of any size, abound in 
trout of a very fine quality. 

Of the rivers the " East Eiver" is, although in many places a chain wide, a very 
small stream, and I think that the branch crossed by the north boundary is the main 
stream, as that branch which extends easterly through Finlayson, dwindles down in 
many places to a mere creek. 

54 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



I fiud on referring to the projected plan of the township, which accompanied nay 
instmctions, that " Long Lake" is shewn to be on North Elver, but this as will be seen 
by my i)lan, is not the case. There is another lake, shewn on the same projected plan, on 
the river at the side line between lots 35 and 36; this is also incorrect; 
during its whole course in Finlayson there is nothing approaching to a lake on the river, 
but I am informed, that there are two large lakes on it, in the township east of Finlayson. 

North Eiver, although having a bed of about one chain wide on an average, is also 
in reality a small stream, except during the spring freshets and heavy rains, and will 
require expensive improvements before timber can be taken down it. On lot 14 there 
is a perpendicular fall of about twenty feet, and this is the only place where there is a 
miU site in its whole course through the townshij). 

In my instructions, I am ordered to continue the north boundary of McClintock across 
lots 30, 31 and 32 of this township, until I reach its north-east angle and plant the 
necessarv posts, at the corners of the above mentioned lots in the 14th concession of 
McCHntock. 

I only found the bouudaiy run to the west side of the small lake, shewn on the plan 
on lots twenty-eight and twenty-nine in Finlayson. From this point I continued the line 
easterly on the same course till I came opposite the east boundary of McClintock, where 
I found I was Qf'o^ chains north of the north-west corner of Finlayson. I then calculated 
on what course to run a line from this point so as to strike my first line at side line 
30 and 31 Finlayson, as I thought it better to make the angle at where two 
road allowances intersected, than at any other point, and on, running my new line, 
westerly I struck the required point. I then adopted this as the true boundary, blazed 
it, and planted the necessary lot posts on either side of it, from where it strikes the small 
lake above mentioned to the north-west corner of Livingstone. The true bearing of this 
line is shewn on my plan and field-notes. 

I did not make out separate field-notes of that portion of the work belonging to 
McClintock, presuming that the notes fiu-nished will be sufficient for both ; it took me 
two days to do the extra work here ; it is always more difficult to take up old work than 
to do new. 

I had six men in the field with me, and a cook in camp. Then" pay was $18 each 
per month and board. I will be satisfied with whatever amount the department may 
choose to allow me for it. 

There are no roads whatever in the township, but settlers are rapidly moving into 
the east side of the township of Sinclah-, where there is one road already partly made, 
and this road will be the most convenient for intending settlers in Finlayson. 

There being no squatters or improvements in the township, no inspection returns 
are required. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

James Dickson. 
Provincial Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable T. B. Pardee. 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



Appendix No. 29. 

DISTEICT OF ALGOMA. 

Township of Gladstone. 

Mill Point, Ontario, 

November 12th, 1870. 

Sir, — In accordance with instructions received from you, dated 14th June, 1879, to 
proceed to, and survey the township of Gladstone, on the Mississauga E.: ver, north shore of 

55 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



Lake Hurou, into lots of 320 acres each, on the 16th July I left Mill Point for Colling- 
wood, taking -with me a chainman and one assistant. Upon my arrival I hired axemen 
and purchased supplies. From that point I proceeded by steamer to Bhnd Eiver, where I 
procured a sail-boat and transported men, supplies, etc., to the mouth of the Mississauga 
Eiver. Here I secured canoes and proceeded on my way up the river until I arrived at the 
western boundary of Thompson. I retraced this line northerly to the south-west angle 
of Patton, where I found an original post. 

On the night of Wednesday, the 23rd of July, I took an observation of Polaris, at 
its eastern elongation, and turning off the azimuth, I measured an angle of 90 degrees 
and proceeded to run the south boundary of Gladstone. After running exactly 80 chaine, 
I turned and ran a due north line between lots 2 and 3. Maldng this line my base of opera- 
tions, I measured 80 chains north and turned off the concession line between 1 and 2 
and carried the line both ways to the east and west boundaries, respectively, making lot 

2, 40 chains and lot 1 whatever it happened to be. I then ran all my concession lines 
excepting between 3 and 4, and 5 and 6, which I only ran to the mining locations as directed 
and shewn on projected plan. I thus carried on my operations to the north and west, 
finishing up at the north-west angle. In posting the north side of mining location No. 

3, I did not plant a post between lots 11 and 12, but called the whole lot 11, as it would 
have made lot 12 a very small one. 

For a like reason I planted no posts between lots 11 and 12, on the north side of 
mining location No. 2. All distances across lakes and rivers on lines were obtained by 
either triangulation or offsets. 

In traversing Mississauga Eiver, where possible it was done by intersected bearings ; 
other distances were arrived at by careful estimate. 

All lakes were traversed by triangulation from a measiu-ed base, or bases, as the case 
required, excepting the small pond on the north boundary which I didnotdeem of sufficient 
importance. 

As the township has been mostly cut over by lumbermen I found very litttle pine 
suitable for marketable purposes, but scattered throughout the township large trees are 
to be found. There is however, a considerable quantity of pitch and Norway phie suitable 
for railway ties, etc. 

There is a considerable lot of hemlock scattered throughout the township, but never 
in clumps, being mixed up with the hardwood. 

Maple and birch form a very fair proportion of the timber, the maple being chiefly 
of the " birdseye" Viiriety, and possesses no inconsiderable marketable value, as a material 
for furniture, cabinet ware, etc. The black birch is also a valuable timber for furniture 
and cabinet makers' purposes. The trees are unusually large, sound and healthy, fre- 
quently measuring 40 inches or more across the butt. The balance of the timber is 
balsam, spruce, cedar and tamarac, chiefly found in the swamps. The cedar is of no 
marketable value, being too small and scrubby. Frequent thickets of balsam and tamarac 
are to be fouud throughout the township, making it very slow work to cut lines through 
them. 

Alder and willow swales are also of frequent occurrence. 

The soil is generally a red sandy loam and is well adapted for agncultm-al pmq^oses. 
Where exposm'es occm-, as along the river banks, it is found to be underlaid by a kind of 
heavy blue clay, and this again by a kind ot decomposed clay-stone. 

From a geological point of view the township of Gladstone jDOssesses no little interest, 
as the Hm-onian and Laiu-entian formations find then* di^-iding line here. One moment 
we come across the well known Hm-onian slates, to be followed the next by the Gneissoid 
rocks of the Laurentian. Owing to the frequency of water- sheds, numerous high clifis 
and bluffs are to be foimd rimning parallel with the Eiver Mississauga, and also between 
the different lakes, etc. Those to the east of the township are generally gneiss, and of 
Laiu'entian age, while those to the west are composed chiefly of slate, and are ofHiuronian 
date. Outside of the mining locations that have been ah-eady smweyed, I foimd no 
minerals of economic value. I obtained specimens from the different lodes in each loca- 
tion; they are herewith enclosed. 

The township is abundantly and well watered, the Mississauga Eiver traversing it from 
itssouth-east to its north-west angle. It is a fine river, varying in width from three to 

56 . 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



ten chains. The banks are high, in places immense cliffs, at others an exposure of the soil 
takes place. Here and there along the south and west banks, good flats of arable land 
are to be foimd. The river in places is very deep, at others quite shallow, with niuner- 
ous sandy shoals. It is very rapid over all the shallow points. Quite a number of falls 
are within the hmits of this township, the first one on lot 8, concession 4, being a flat, 
rough rapid about 15 chains long, with three leaps of an estimated total fall of 10 feet. 
The Indians, however, run it with their canoes. 

The second one, on lot 10, in the 4th concession, is a very pictiu'esque abrupt 
fall of about 20 feet, an island in the centre of the fall dividing it into two chutes. This 
is the highest point fish ascend. 

The third is known as the " Slate Falls Portage," situated in mining location No. 1, 
south. It is a very beautiful fall of about 20 feet, and ghdes smoothly over the natural 
" dip " of the slate- strata, and is about six chains wide. The fourth and last, is situated 
on the west boimdary, in the sixth concession. It is grandly pictm'esque. Here the 
whole river takes a sharp tium to the west, at an angle of about 60°, and first rolls over 
a chff about 30 feet high into a natm'al canal, with pei-pendicular walls. This canal is 
only 30 feet wide, and the river rushes through it for about ten chains, white with foam, 
into the adjoining township of Day. It then turns sharply back again to the east, return- 
ing to the township of Gladstoile. Stiu'geon and pike were the only fish we succeeded 
in captiuing. 

To the east, entering the township at its north-east comer, and shortly leaving it 
again to return about half way down the boundary, is the Marsh River. As its name im- 
phes, it is a marshy stream, and of no impoi-tance, its width at no point exceeding one 
chain ; it is not navigable ; no fish were foimd in it. 

Pakawagamengan, or Mud Lake, is the largest within the township. It is situated in 
the south-west comer. The water is of a somewhat muddy character, but still very 
good for drinldng purposee. Wild rice grows on its shores. Ducks and fish are plenti- 
ful, I am told. 

Wahquekobing, or Basswood Lake, is the next one of importance, only a bay of it 
entering this township, the larger part lying in the adjoining township of Day. The 
water of this lake is beautifully clear and cold, the bottom bejng plainly visible at a depth 
of twenty feet or more. Fish are very plentiful, bass, trout, and pickerel being the prin- 
cipal varieties. 

Clear Lake, and also the small lake to the east of it, are both clear cold spring lakes, 
with high bold shores. Trout and bass were found in both. The other small lakes are 
of no importance, being mere ponds, the water being swampy and brackish. 

A great many small springs are to be found all throughout the township. 

A small settlement might be formed on the North shore of Lake Pakawagamengan. 
A man can paddle easily to the Hudson Bay Post at the mouth of the Mississauga River in 
one day by taking the creek which forms the out-let of this lake, and which passes 
through the adjommg township of Bright. Mr. Joseph Dupuis, who has a clearing on 
the boundary between Gladstone and Day, on the north half of 12, in the 2nd concession, 
informs me he is only 12 miles from a grist mill by way of Lake Wahquecobing and 
Thessalon River, Mr. Dupuis had as fine a crop of wheat as I have seen for a long 
time, testifying in the best manner, to the richness of the soil. 

Mr. Henry Brisson has also a clearing of about five acres and had an excellent crop 
of wheat, beans, potatoes and corn. He is also on the north half of lot 12, in the 2nd 
concession. 

Another settlement might be formed around Clear Lake, and also the small lake 
to the east of it. The eligible flats along the river and also along the north boim- 
dary will, in the course of time, be settled up. Taking this township altogether, I 
think there is fully 50 per cent, of it fit for settlement. 

The presence of mining facilities will also be a valuable adjunct in its future settle- 
ment. 

A mill site might be obtained at the Slate Falls with little expense. 

I crossed one of the exploration lines of the Canada Pacific Railway. Should it 
ever be built, I have no doubt every available foot of land in this district would be 
taken up. 

57 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



I have the honour to enclose my returns of survey, which I trust will be found 
satisfactory. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Matthew J, Butler, 

Provincial Land Surveyor. 
The Honoiurable T. B. Pardee, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 

Toronto. 



Appendix No. 30. 

Township of Bright and Bright Additional. 

LiSTOWEL, Ontario. 

November 1st, 1879. 

Sir, — I beg leave to submit the following report of the survey of the township of 
Bright and Bright additional, in the district of Algoma. 

As per your instructions dated the fourteenth day of June, A. D. 1879, I retraced 
the west boundary of the township of Thompson, until I came to the post between 
sections nineteen and thirty which j)oiut I found to be twenty-four chains and seventy- 
one links northerly from the shore of Lake Huron. At this point, after ascertaining by 
astronomical observation the true course, I ran due west, astronomical, for the front of 
the third concession, planting a post at forty chains, being the point between lots 1 and 
2 ; at eiglity chains, I ran due north between lots 2 and 3, and continued north, 
laying off the fourth and fifth concessions at a depth of eighty chains each, leaving the 
6th concession plus or minus as the case might be. On arriving at the north boundary, 
I found that P.L.S. M. J. Butler had ah-eady run the said boundary between Bright 
and Gladstone. I therefore produced the concession lines due east and west, running 
the side lines due north and south as per your instructions. 

I traversed Lake Pakawagamengan and another small lake, being all that I con- 
sidered large enough. 

I also traversed the Eiver Mississauga from the point that it crosses the north 
boundary oft his township to the point on the east boundary at which it flows out. 

Also the shore of Lake Huron, commencing at the south-east corner of this township, 
and ending at the south-east corner of the Indian reseiwe, connecting the same with the 
concessions and side lines. 

In Bright additional I found lines running north and south, and east and west, cut 
and blazed. On enquiry I ascertained that some parties had during last winter run these 
lines with a view of taking up the best lots and making improvements thereon. Com- 
mencing then' smwey from the Indian reserve, making the concessions and lots corres- 
pond therewith, it did not coincide with the proper suiwey, consequently on some lots 
more than one party had made improvements, thereby causing disputes. 

The greater portion of the township is covered with cedar, pine, tamarac, spruce and 
balsam, mixed with birch, poplar and hemlock. The pine is very much scattered, but 
of good quality, the D^-ment lumber company having taken out the greater part during 
last winter. 

In the north-east portion of Bright there is a district which has been burnt over 
some ten or twelve years ago, leaving here and there a small patch of the original forest. 
The greater portion of this district is covered with balsam, tamarac, cedar, j)C)plar and 
birch scrub with here and there a dry pine standing. 

In Bright additional there are several hardwood ridges, very heavily timbered with 
maple, birch, and hemlock; in the valleys and flats considerable ash and elm. 

58 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



Nearly all of Bright is of clay loam, but rather wet and cold, with the exception of 
a portion of the burnt distiict which is more rolling, and consequently drier and more 
porous. 

In Bright additional the soil is not so good, in many places nothing but blowing 
sand, and in the swamps quick- sand bottom. 

Water is of good quahty, and abimdant throughout the township. Quite a number 
of fine springs and small streams. In the lakes the water is clear and good, but soft. 

Nearly all the rock in this township is argillaceous. In the north east portion of 
Bright there are several ridges of this rock protruding in many places over fifty feet in 
height, but narrow. The soil between these ridges is of excellent quahty. 

Ked gi'anite crops out here and there along the shore of Lake Huron, but does not 
protrude more than ten feet ; boulders of granite and pudding stone, containing jasper, 
are found along the shore and a short distance northerly. 

I did not consider it necessary to collect any specimens of rock, there being notliing 
of any value to be found. 

The greater portion of the township is level and fit for cultivation, having excellent 
facilities for transportation by water, and if settled with thrifty farmers would in a few 
years become a prosperous settlement. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be, Su", 

Your obedient servant, 

Lewis Bolton, 
Provincial Land Surveyor. 
To the Honourable T. B. Pardee, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 

Toronto. 



Appendix No. 31. 

Township of Parkinson. 

collingwood, ontario. 

November 15th, 1879. 

Sir, — I have the honom*, in accordance with instructions dated Jime 17th, 1879, to 
submit the following report on the sm-vey of the Township of Parkinson, in the district 
of Algoma : — 

Having reached the landing at the mouth of Blind River, by steamer, I proceeded 
with canoes up the " Mississauga" as far as the second falls, about fifteen miles fi-om its 
mouth. From this place I had to pack my supphes and outfit, about fom- miles north to 
reach the south boundary of the to-\vnship. 

I commenced the sm-vey by starting fi-om the post at the noi-th-west angle of the 
township of Patton, and working northerly and westerly, completing about two 
thirds of the distance fi-om east to west, as we moved north and the balance as we retmiied 
south. 

With regard to tlie agricultural capabihties of this township, I am compelled to 
report very unfavourably, not more than ten per cent, of its area being in my estimation 
of it for settlement. Its general character is that of a rocky mountainous district mth 
no weU defined outline to the hills, but broken up into an almost endless variety of bluffs. 
Near the south boundary are a few lots of good land, but unless the adjacent portion of 
the Township of Gladstone is also good, I fear there would not be a sufficient area oji 
which to form a settlement. 

Regarding timber there is a considerable quantity of hardwood, principally maple, on 
the high land, but following the general character of the district, the land on which it 

59 



43 Yictoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A 1880 



grows is almost invariably stony. Occasional white pine trees are met with, scattered 
here and there throughout a considerable portion of the township, but nowhere except 
perhaps, at the south-west comer of the township in sufficient quantities to attract the 
lumbermen. 

I found several indications of mineral deposits. Specular iron ore seeming to pre- 
dominate. 

Fish are numerous in Lakes Cleland and Constance, but no brook trout were met 
with in the streams. The only stream of any size flowing through the township is the 
Little White River. It is navigable for canoes, though in many places the water is 
very shallow, and rapids are numerous. On the left bank of this stream in this township 
a few miles of open prauie are met with, but here imfortunately, the soil is worthless, 



being a very hght sand of inferior quality. 



The Honourable T. B. Pardee, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Yom" obedient servant, 

E. Stewart, 
Provincial Land Surveyor. 



Appendix No. 32. 
Township of Wells. 

Belleville, Ontario, November 21st, 1879. 

Sir, — I have the honoiu* to report that, in accordance with my instructions bearing 
date the 23rd of Jime, 1879, I have completed the survey of the Township of Wells, in 
the District of Algoma. 

I proceeded to the township via CoUingwood, where I prociu'ed my supphes and 
employed most of my party. I here took the steamboat to Blind River Mills, and then 
having pm'chased canoes, I proceeded up the ]\Iississauga River, which took me to the 
south-east angle of the township of Wells. 

As instructed, I had previously communicated with Messrs. Stewart and Abrey 
about running the south boundary of Wells and Parkinson, which you desu-ed should be 
one continuous line, and I had made an arrangement that Mr. Abrey should nm all 
the boimdary hne between Day and Wells and meet Mr. Stewart's line at the South-west 
angle of Parkhison, while I should iim all the boimdary line between Wells and Parkin- 
son. I, therefore, foimd all my south boundary ah-eady run by Mr. Abrey, and the 
Bouth-west angle of Parkinson (being the south-east angle of Wells) actually determined. 
In consequence of this I commenced work here instead of at the south-west angle as 
directed in my 's^T.'itten instructions. 

I took an observation of Polaris here, and starting from the post planted by Mr. 
Stewart for the south-west angle of Parkinson, I ran the line between Wells and Parkin- 
son due north six miles, to intersect the north boundarj^ of Parkinson. 

At every 80 chains, on this hne, I commenced the concession lines, which I ran due 
west to intersect the eastern boundary of Bridgland. I ran my north boundary on such 
a bearing as to strike the north-east angle of Bridgland. As will be seen on the accom- 
paming plan, the side lines I ran all due north. 

The River Mississauga flows through the township, entering it on Lot 7, in the 
6th Concession, and leaving it near the south-east corner. In its com'se through this 
township, the river averages fi'om 200 to 250 feet in width, and is generally shal- 
low, in some places less than a foot in depth, while in others the water is five and six feet 
eep. 

The shallow places are generally caused by gravel and sand bars, and the current is 
usually swift and strong, but where the water is deep the cmTent is very gentle. There 

60 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. i88(> 



are no rapids on the river from the south boundary up to where the line between Lots 4 
and 5 crosses it on Concession 6. From the north boundary down to this point the 
river flows through a chasm in a high moimtain range, wliich traverses the northern por- 
tion of the townsliip ; tlirough tliis gorge, for over a mile, the stream is a succession of cas- 
cades and rapids, and the banks on each side are steep and precipitous in the extreme. 

I saw only four small lakes in the township and there are no important streams 
except the Mississauga. 

The land in this township will I think compare favom*ably with any of the siuround- 
ing townships in this section of the country there being large tracts of hardwood among 
which can be foimd some very fair farms, and along the river there are some excellent 
flats of good land. 

Towards the south-east corner is a tract of countiy bearing a considerable quantity 
of small sized white pine timber of very fan- quahty mixed with balsam and birch. 
Through this section the soil is hght and gravelly. 

Traversing the south-west corner there is a tract of about 2,000 acres of rocky barren 
coimtiy, covered with small scrubby timber. This section is good for nothing. 

A large hardwood tract comes in to the west of the pinery and north of the rocky 
belt, and sweeps towards the north and west, and embraces some twelve or fifteen 
thousand acres ; a great deal of this hardwood tract is veiy stony, but the soil is an 
excellent sandy loam. 

Towards the north of the township the timber is generally of a mixed character, 
consisting cliiefly of balsam, spruce, bfrch, poplar, &c., 

A most remarkable featm-e in this section of the township is a large open plain or 
prairie embracing about 2,000 acres. On this plain there are occasional clumps of 
spruce, pitch puie and poplar, but in places it is like an open field. The soil on this plain 
is generally gravelly, but in some places it is a very good yellow loam. 

To the norih of this plain the mountain ranges occur through which the 
Mississauga cleaves its com'se and these ranges form a very marked featm-e in the 
north em portion of the township. There are some veiy high hills iu this township, 
but it is not so generally mountainous as most of the adjoining townships. I think on 
the whole that fr-om 40 to 50 per cent, of the land is fit for settlement, but at present 
there is no way for intending settlers to get in except by the river. 

If a road were built to connect this section of the coimtry with the Thessalon 
settlements and Brace 'Mines, I have no doubt but that a good settlement could be formed 
there. 

The rocks appear to be the slate rock and quartzites of the Hm-onian formation 
while in some sections the Laui'entian gneiss predominates. I saw some indications of 
copper, but did not make any particular examinations. There appears to be fron present 
towards the noi-th-east corner of the township, judgmg from the distm-bance of the 
magnetic needle. 

I do not think that there are any fish in the river in this township as the falls in 
the township of Gladstone stop them fr-om coming up. I had no means of ascertaining 
whether there were any hi the small lakes. 

There appears to be a good many beaver on the small streams throughout the 
township, but other fur bearing animals appear scarce. Moose-tracks are occasionally 
seen, but I do not think moose are very plentiful. I saw no signs of the common deer. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Yom* obedient servant, 

Thomas 0. Bolger, 
Provincial Land Surveyor. 

The Honourable T. B. Pardee, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 

61 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



Appendix Xo. 33. 

Township of Day. 

Little Current, Ontario, 

October, 15th, 1879. 

Sir, — In compliance with instructions from the Honom-able the Commissioner of 
Crown Lands, for Ontario, dated at Toronto, the 14th day of June last, I sub- divided the 
Township of Day into farm lots, and beg to forward herewith copies of field notes, inspec- 
tion repoi-t, and plan of the siu'vey of the same, and to report as follows : 

I proceeded to the locahty by way of Mississauga Eiver, with an open sail boat, going 
up the river with the same, some 15 miles, to the second considerable rapids. I there 
abandoned the sail boat and took to canoes, continuing up the river some three-fourths 
of a mile farther, to the portage crossing over to the most easterly end of Lake Waque- 
kobing, thence portaged to the lake, and thence with canoes to the westerly side of the 
township of Day, to commence work. 

I commenced the survey by tracing the eastern boundary of Kirkwood southerly, 
from the shore of Lake Waquekobing to the limit of Cons. 4 and 5, of Ku-kwood, making 
this point also the starting pomt for Day, and ran due east from this point, planting 
posts at every 40 chains, marking the angles of the lots along the front of the 5th Conces- 
sion of Day. Thence by lines north and south, and east and west, I sub-divided into 
blocks of one mile square. 

The boundary lines of Kirkwood, Thessalon, Gladstone and Parkinson were already 
run, and these were adhered to as boundaries of Day. I ran the boundary between Day 
and Bright additional, due west from the south-west angle of Gladstone to Thessalon and 
the boundary between Day and AVells, due east from the north east angle of Kirkwood to 
side line between lots 6 and 7. Thence I ran south 84 J° east, to intersect with the 
south-west angle of Parkinson. 

The running of this northern boundary of Day was delayed till the last, hoping that 
the sm-veyors of the adjacent townsliips would fix the point at its eastern end, and thus 
enable me to make it a straight line. Disappointed in tliis, I ran east as mentioned, till 
the eastern end was fixed, and connected with a straight line. 

The instruments used were the same as those used and described last year, the prin- 
cipal ones being a solar compass and a solar transit. All lines and observations were 
run or made with one of these. 

The township has a very large portion of its smface covered with lakes, more than 
a third of the area being water. The lakes all afford abundance of good fish, and wiU 
give good access for settlement prior to the constiniction of roads. 

The surveys of the lakes were entu-ely made by triangulation, the whole being based 
on that independently made for the concession and side lines of the township. 

All posts, not otherwise described in the field notes, are composed of cedar, all well 
secured in the ground, and properly marked with a scribe. 

All that portion of the township south of Lake Waquekobmg, is well adapted for 
settlement, excepting a narrow strip bordering that lake. No better agricultm-al land 
exists than a large portion of this described belt. North of that lake is much broken 
•with rocks. Some 5 or 6 lots only, in the norih-eastem portion, near the Mississauga 
Eiver, are of fair quahty. 

The projected Georgian Bay branch of the Canada Pacific Eailway, traverses entirely 
across this townsliip, between the lakes. The hberal grants recently expended on colo- 
nization roads in Algoma, have made access to the western side of the township, from 
the port of Thessalon, easy. The settlers have akeady extended these nearly a mile 
into Day. 

No portion of the township has been iiljured by recent fires except in one or two 
places along the boundary of Thesalon, where some little timber has been destroyed. 

The timber, as is the rule in this country, is generally composed principally of maple. 
Some considerable swamps were met with in the southern part oi the township. Some 

62 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 4.) A. 1880 



good pines were seen in the north-easterly section, but not of sufficient extent to make it 
desirable for any reservations. 

A good water-power exists on Lot 3, in the Second Concession, on the outlet of Lake 
Waquekobing, and ought to be reserved. Of course, a large amount of water-power 
exists on the various falls of the Missisagua Eiver, but is not very available for the 
immediate requirements of the pioneer settler. 

No economic minerals were discovered anywhere. In a few places, principally 
on the shores of the large lake, considerable local magnetic attraction was observed. 
Some copper mines have been opened up and abandoned near the eastern boundary of 
Day, in Gladstone. A location comprising one of these copper mines extends into Day from 
Gladstone, as shown on plan of the township. None of its boundaries were observed in 
running the lines in Day, and being imaware of its existence no special search was made 
to discover any. After coming home, P. L. S. Butler, in smweying the adjoining town- 
ship traced out the location lymg partly in Gladstone and partly in Day, and kindly for- 
warded me the field notes of his smwey of the portion in Day. These have been inserted 
in the accompanying field notes and the plan constructed accordingly. 

Already, prior to the survey, or during its progress, nearly the whole of the township 
south of Lake Waquekobing has been squatted upon by what would appear to be actual 
bona fide settlers. The improvements made by these, with such other information con- 
cerning the same as could be obtained, -uoU be found detailed in the field notes and 
inspection report accompanying this report. 

I have the honour to be, Sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

G. Brockitt Abrey, 

Provincial Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable T. B. Pardee, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



63 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



ANNUAL REPORT 



MINISTER OF EDUCATION, 



ox THE 



PUBLIC, SEPARATE, AND HIGH SCHOOLS, 



ALSO ON THE 



NORMAL AND MODEL SCHOOLS, 
OF THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO, FOR THE YEAR 1878. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



.i^3sr2srTj.A.L :re:fo:rt 

OF THE 

INISTER OF EDUCATION, 



ON THE 



PUBLIC, SEPARATE, AND HIGH SCHOOLS, 



ALSO ON THE 



NORMAL AND MODEL SCHOOLS, 



OF THE 



FOR THE YEAR 



1878. 



gvintcrt h\j (Drder af the legislative ^^sinubly. 




^avauta: 

PRINTED BY C. BLACKETT ROBINSON, 5 JORDAN STREET. 

1880. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



CONTENTS. 



PART I.— GENERAL REPORT. 

PAGE. 

Introduction 

I. Table A.— Eeeeipts aud Expenditure of Public School Moneys 11 

II. Table B.— School Population ; Ages of Pupils ; Pupils attending Public Schools ; 

Average Attendance 13 

III. Table C — Number of Pupils in the different branches of Instruction 13 

IV. Tabled. — Religious Denominations; Certificates ; Annual Salaries of Teachers. 13 

V. Table E. — School Boards and Eural School Corporations 14 

VI. Table F. — Roman CathoUc Separate Schools 15 

VII. Table G. — High Schools ; Receipts and Expenditure ; Pupils ; Number of Schools 15 

Vni. Table H. — High Schools; Number of Pupils in the various branches ; Miscel- 
laneous information ; Head Masters aud their Universities 15 

IX. Table I. — Normal and Model Schools 16 

X. Table J. — Free Public Libraries 17 

XI. Table K. — Summary of Maps, Apparatus and Prize Books, supplied to the Coun- 
ties, Cities, Towns and Villages, during the year 17 

(1) Table showing tho value of articles sent out from the Education Depository dur- 

ing the years 1851 to 1878 inclusive 18 

(2) Book imports into Ontario and Quebec 19 

XII. Table L. — Superannuated Teachers of Public Schools 20 

XIII. Table M. — Educational Summary 20 

XIV. Table N. — General Statistical Abstract cf the progressof Education in Ontario, 

from 1842 to 1878 inclusive 20 

XV. The Educational Museum 20 

Conclusion 22 



PART II.— STATISTICAL REPORT, 

THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

Table A. — Moneys ; Amount received and expended in support of Public Schools 2!) 

Table B. — Pupils ; Pupils attending the Public Schools, Ages of Pupils, &c 32 

Table C. — Number of Pupils in the different branches of Public School Education 38 

Table D. — The Number, Religious Dencminations, Certificates and Salaries of Public 

School Teachers 44 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (Xo. 5.) A. 1880 



PAGE. 

Table E. — Schools ; Number of Public Schools, School-houses, Visits, Lectures and time 

the Public Schools have been kept open ; Prayers, Examinations, &c. 45 
Table F. — The Roman Catholic Separate Schools 48 

THE HIGH SCHOOLS. 

Table G. — Moneys received and expended in support of High Schools ; Pupils; Fees 50 

Table H — Xumber of Pupils in the various branches of instruction ; Miscellaneous infor- 
mation ; Head Masters and their Universities 54 

THE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 

Table I — Toronto Normal School. — Number of Students, their Residences and Religious 

Denominations 66 

Ottawa Normal School. — Number of Students, their Residences and Religious 

Denominations 69 

THE FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES. 
Table J. — Moneys; Number of volumes and miscellaneous information; other Libraries. 72 

THE PUBLIC AND HIGH SCHOOLS. 
Table K. — Maps and apparatus supplied by the Education Department 77 

THE SUPERANNUATED PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS. 
Table L. — Names and periods of Service of Teachers and their Pensions 81 

THE EDUCATIONAL SUMMARY. 

Table M. — -Number of Institutions and Pupils, and moneys expended for Educational 

purposes 89 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Table N. —General Statistical Abstract of the Educational progress of Ontario 92 



PART III.— APPENDICES. 

A. — Report of Dr. May on Department at the Paris Exhibition 97 

B.— Report of J. A. McLellan, Esq., LL.D.; J. M. Buchan, Esq., M.A., and S. Arthur 

Marling, Esq., M.A., Inspectors of High Schools 100 

Addendum No. 1.— Comparative Table for 1877 and 1878, showing the progress or 

decline of each High School 102 

C. — Annual Report of the Minister of Education, and of the Sub-Committee of the Central 

Committee of Examiners, on County Model Schools 104 

D. — Extracts from Reports of Inspectors of Public Schools. 

Donald McDairmid, Esq., M.D., Glengarry 110 

A. McNaughton, Esq.. Stormont •••• 116 

Arthur Brown , Esq. , Dundas 117 

vi. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



PAGE. 

Rev. Thos. Garrett, B.A., Eussell 118 

"W. R. Bigg, Esq., No. 1 Leeds 118 

Henry L. Slack, Esq., M.A., Lanark 118 

R. G. Scott, Esq., B.A., Renfrew 120 

G. D. Piatt, Esq., B.A., Prince Edward 121 

W. Mackintosh, Esq., Hastings, North 121 

John Johnston, Esq., Hastings, South 122 

C. D. Curry, Esq., B.A., Hahburton 128 

J. McBrieu, Esq., Ontario 12i 

D. Fotheringhani, Esq., North York 124 

J. Hodgson, Esq , South York 125 

M. J. Kelly, Esq., M.D., Brant, and City of Brantford 126 

J. B. Somerset, Esq., Lincoln 127 

T. Gu-ardot, Esq., No. 1 Essex, Townl of Sandwich and Amherstburgh 128 

J. E, Miller, Esq., Parry Sound 129 

Rev. A. McColI, Chatham 129 

E. — Orders in Council: — 

I. Appointment of Sub-Examiners for December Examination 130 

II. Appointment of additional Sub-Examiners for December Examination .. 130 

III. Regulations respecting Appeals by Candidates at Examinations 180 

IV. Be Intermediate Examination at St. Thomas and Berlin 130 

V. High School established at Mount Forest 131 

VI. Examination Frauds 131 

VII. Irregularities at Berhn and St. Thomas High School Examinations 133 

VIII. Leave of Absence granted to Dr. S. P. May ; 138 

IX. Certificates j^ranted Teachers who passed examination in December, but 
whose Certificates were cancelled on account of being imphcated in 
examination frauds 134 

X. Appointment of Sub-Examiners for July Examinations 134 

XI. Certificates granted to Candidates deprived of them owing to the frauds 

at the July Examinations 134 

XII. Collingwood High School, established as a Collegiate Institute 134 

XIII. Reimbursing the Trustees of S. S. No. 4, Oakland 134 

XTV^. Re\dsed Regulations as to PubHc and High Schools 134 

XV. Surrender of High School Lands, Niagara .* 184 

XVI. Surrender of High School Lands, Newnnarket 134 

XVII. Regulations as to Authorized Text Books 135 

XVIII. Establishment of a High School at Seaforth 135 

XIX. W. J. Graham appointed caretaker of the Museum 185 

XX. Omission of Text Books from list of approved Library and Prize Books.. 135 

XXI. Sub-Examiners for December Intermediate Examinations 135 

XXII. Sub-Examiner appointed for December Internaediate Examinations 135 

F. — Teachers' Associations 180 

G. — Provincial Certificates : — 

(1.) Certificates granted by the Education Department 138 

(2.) Number of Certificates issued, 1878 141 

(3.) Total number of Certificates issued from 1871 to 1878 148 

vii. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



PAGE. 

H. — Inspectors' and Examiners' Certificates, and Retired Teachers 

I. Names of Persons who have received Inspectors' Certificates during 1878 143 

II. Names of Pei'sons who have received High School Masters' Certificates dur- 
ing 1878 143 

III. Names of Persons woo have received Examiners' Certificates during 1878 144 

IV. Teachers who have retired from the Pi-ofessiou dmdng 1878 144 

I. — List of High and Public School Inspectors 

(1.) List of High School Inspectors 147 

(2.) List of PubUc School Inspectors 147 



Vlll. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



:p.a.i^t I, 



GENERAL REPORT 

1878. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No, 5.) A. 1880 

AKNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

MINISTER OF EDUCATION (ONTARIO.) 

FOR THE YEAR 1878, RESPECTING THE 

PUBLIC, SEPARATE AND HIGH SCHOOLS, 

ALSO, 

THE NORMAL AND MODEL SCHOOLS. 



PART I— GENERAL REPORT. 



To His Honour the Honourable D. A. Macdonald, Lieutenant-Governor of the 

Province of Ontario. 

May it Please your Honour, 

I herewith present the Report of the Education Department on the condition of the 
Public, Separate, and High Schools, also of the Normal and Model Schools of the Pro- 
vince of Ontario, for the year 1878. 

I will now proceed to give a Summary view of their condition, condensed from the 
Statistical Tables accompanying this Report : — 

L — Table A. — Receipts and Expendituee of Public School Moneys. 

The Eecei])ts. 

1. The amount apportioned from the Legislative Grant was $258,538 — increase' 
$6,576. The apportionment is made to the several Counties, Townships, Cities, Towns' 
and Incorporated Villages, according to the ratio of the population in each, as compared 
with the whole population of the Province. The principle of distribution is according to 
the average attendance and the time of keeping open the Schools, Public and Separate, 
in each Municipality. 

2. The amount apportioned from the Legislative grant (through the Educational 
Depository) for the purchase of maps, apparatus, prize and library books was $15,756 — 
decrease, $2,347. 

3. — The amount from County Municipal Assessment was $872,354, showing an 
increase of $14,049. 

4. The amount available from Trustees' School Assessment was $1,405,686 — decrease, 
$158,439. 

5. The amount from Clergy Reserves Moneys, and from other sources, applied to 
School purpos3s in 1878, was $694,981 — decrease, $35,702. 

G. The Total Receipts for all Public School purposes for tlie year 1878, amounted to 
$3,247,321, showing a decrease of $175,803 over the total receipts of the preceding year. 

7. The following talde shows the progressive increase in the amounts levied by the 
Municipal and School Trustee Corporations, and also the yearly increase in the total 
receipts since 1860. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



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43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



The Expenditure. 

1. The amount paid by trustees for salariesof teachers in 1878 was $2,011,207, — de- 
crease $26,891. 

2. For maps, globes, prize books and Hbraries, $42,507, decrease, $5,032. The 
Legislative aid given to trustees (through the Educational Depositor}) for these objects 
was, $15,756. 

3. For sites and building of School-houses, .$413,392— decrease, $64,000. For seve- 
ral years after the pas age of the School Act of 1871, a large amount was yearly expen- 
ded in the erection of new school-housei^, so that the country is now tolerably well supplied 
with them. A decrease of this item may therefore be expected for some years to come. 

- 4. For rent and repairs of School-houses, &c., $422 239— decrease $88,218. 

5. Total expenditure for all Public School purposes, $2,889,347— decrease, $184,142. 

6. Balance of School Moneys not paid at the end of the year when the returns 
were made, $357,974— increase,"$8,278. 

II. — Table B. — School Population, Ages of Pupils, Pupils Attending Public 
Schools, Average Attendance. 

The Statute requires that the trustees' returns of School population shall include 
the entire number of children resident in their School Division ; and it confers the tqual 
right of attending the Schools upon all residents in such divisions, between the ages of 
five and twenty-one years. 

1. The School population (comprising only children between the ages of five and 
sixteen years) reported by trustees was 492,360 — decrease, 2,444. 

2. The number of pupils between the ages of five and sixteen years attending the 
Schools, was 467,433 — decrease, 1,808. Number of pupils of other ages attending the 
Schools, 21,582 — decrease, 37. Total number of pupils attending the Schools, 489,015 
— decrease, 1845. 

3. The number of boys attending the Schools, 260,400 — decrease, 670. The num- 
ber of girls attending the Schools, 228,615 — decrease, 1,175. 

4. The number reported as not attending any School for four months during the 
year, is 27,415 — increase, 1,441. These were between the ages of seven and twelve 
years, during which School Boards and Trustees are required by the Public Schools Act to 
see that all the children in their School districts attend School for four months in the year. 

5. The average attendance, viz., the aggregate daily attendance divided by the legal 
number of teaching days in the year, was 224,588 — increase, 7,404. 

III. — Table C. — Number of Pupils in the Different Branches of Instruction. 
This Table shows the number of pupils as classified under the new system. 

IV. —Table D. — Religious Denominations, Certificates, Annual Salaries op 

Teachers. 

1. Number of Teachers, Mole and Female. — In the 4,990 schools reported, 0,473 
teachers have been employed — increase, 5 ; of whom 3,060 are male teachers — increase, 
40; and 3,413 are female teachers — decrease, 35. It will thus be seen that there are 
about 400 more female than male teachers. 

2. Relirjions Pcrmasinns of Tenchers. Under this liead there is little variation. The 
teachers are reported to be of the following persuasions : — Church of England, 949— 
decrease, 23; Roman Catholic, 789 — decrease, 23; Presbyterians, 2,042 — increase, 20; 
Methodists, 2052 — increase, 47; Baptists, 337 — decrease 11; Cougregationalists, 106 — 
increase, 9; Lutherans, 20; Quakers, 17; Christians and Disciples, 49; reported as 
Protestants, 65; Plymouth Brethren, 2; Unitariiins, 5; other persuasions, 40. 

Of 789 teachers of the Roman Catholic Church 456 are employed in the Public 
Schools, and 333 are teachers of R. C. Separate Schools. 

3. Teachers' Certificates. — Total number of certificated or licensed teachers reported, 
6,473 — increase, 5 ; Provincial Certificates, 1st class, 210 — decrease, 40 ; 2nd class, 1,409 

13 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



— increase, 105 ; County Board Certificates of the Old Standard, 1st class, 328 — decrease, 
43 ; 2nd class, 142 — increase, 8 ; 3rd class, none — decrease 14 ; New County Board, 3rd 
class Certificates, 8,904^decrease, 22; Interim Certificates, 480 — increase, 11. 

4. Anutcal Salaries of Teachers. — The highest salary paid to a male teacher iu a 
County, $800 — the lowest, S125 ; in a City, the highest,"$l,000 — the lowest, 8500; in a 
Toiim, the highest, $1.200 — the lowest, $200. The average salary of male teachers in 
Cotmties, was $382 — of female teachers, $247 ; in Cities, of male teachers, $730,- of 
female teachers, $313 ; in Toxins, of male teachers, $577 — of female teachers, $274. 
The average decrease of male teachers' salaries for the Province during 1878, is $3 per 
male teacher. 

V. — Table E.— School Boards and Eural School Corporations. 

1. The number of Urban School Boards was as follows : — In Cities 16 ; in Towns, 
83 ; in Incorporated Villages, 125, being a total of 224. 

2. The number of Urbayi School-houses -wsls SiS follows: In Cities, 116; iu Towns, 
174 : in Incorporated Villages, 175. 

3. The total number of pupils in Urban Schools registered during the year was, in 
Cities, 43,754; in Towns, 49,041 ; in Incorporated Villages, 41,507; and the average 
daily attendance was, in Cities, 24,920 ; in Towns, 26,890 ; in Incorporated Villages, 
19,608. 

4. The numbfr of Toicnship School Boards was 4, that is to say, in the following 
Townships — Enniskillen, Tuckersmith, Macaulay and Morrison. 

5. The number of Rural School Sections was, 4,751— decrease, 165. The number 
of Rural Schools reported as kej)t open, was 4,700 — decrease, 137. 

6. The decrease in number of Rural School-houses was 82. Of late years there has 
been a most satisfactory improvement in the School-houses, and in stone, brick, and 
frame taking the place of the old log-built School-houses. 

7. The whole number of School-houses reported is 5,066, of which 1,569 are brick, 
511 stone, 2,1Q1 frame, 705 log. 

8. Titles to School Sites. — Freehold, 4,902-^decrease, 25 ; Rented, 164- — decrease, 57. 

9. School Visits. — By Inspectors, 12,745 — increase, 353 ; by Clergymen, 8,042 — in- 
crease 165 ; by Municipal Councillors and Magistrates, 2,076 — decrease, 267 ; by Judges 
and Members of Parliament, 270 — decrease, 82 ; by Trustees, 21,597 — decrease, 322 ; 
bv other persons, 55,522^ — increase, 1,373. Total School visits 100,252 — increase, 1,220. 
Trustees especially are bound to show zeal and interest iu Public School Education and 
by personal visits to the schools, and counsel to parents, incite them to educate their 
children. 

10. School Lectures. — By Inspectors, 529 — decrease, 128; by other persons, 320 — 
increase, 88. 

11. Tiine of Keeping the Schools open. — The average time of keeping the Schools open, 
exclusive of holidays, vacations and Sundays, was two hundj-ed and six days in 1878. 
The actual number of legal teaching days was 221. 

12. Public School Examinations. — The whole number of Public School Examinations 
was 9,949— decrease, 931; though less than two for each School. The law requires 
that there should be in each School a public quarterly examination, of which the teacher 
should give notice to trustees and parents of pupils, and to the school visitors (clergymen, 
magistrates, &c.,) resident iu the School Section. Such examinations being tests of effi- 
ciency on the part of teachers, and of progress on the part of pupils, cannot fail to pro- 
duce beneficial effects on Public Schools. 

13. School Prises and Merit Cards. — The number of Schools in which prizes are re- 
ported na having been distributed to reward and encourage meritorious pupils is 1,663 — 
decrease, 65. 

14. Prayers and Ten Commandments. — Of the 4.990 Schools reported, the daily exer- 
cises were opened and closed with prayers in 4,288 of them — increase, 7 ; and the Ten 
Commandments were taught in 2,828 — decrease, 143. While the Public Schools /Vet 
provides that " No person shall require any pupil in any Public School to read or study 
from any religious book, or to join in any exercise of devotion or religion, objected to by 

14 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



his or her parent," the Department has framed reguhitions of fi recommendatory nature 
on the subject, with forms of prayers, iu the earnest hope that School Boards, Trustees 
and Teachers may thus be better enabled to impress upon their pupils the principles and 
duties of our common Christianity. In 4,288, out of 4,990 Schools, religious exercises 
of the kind recommended by the Department are voluntarily conducted. 

15. 2[aps. — Maps are used in 4,670 Schools — increase, 4. Total number of maps 
used hi Schools, 38,995 — increase, 1,502. 

VI. — Table F. — Roman Catholic Separate Schools. 

1. The number of Roman Catholic Separate Schools is 177 — decrease during th© 
year, 9. 

2. Receipts. — The amount apportioned and paid by the Department of Education 
from the Legislative Grant to Separate Schools according to average attendance of 
pupils as compared with that at the Public Schools in the same Municipalities, was ^12,- 
620- — increase, 244. The amount apportioned and paid for the purchase of maps, prize 
books and librciries, upon the usual condition of an equal sum being provided from local 
sources, was $788 — decrease, $442. The atUount of School ratea from the supporters of 
Separate Schools, was $79,120 — increase, $6,942. The amount subscribed by supporters- 
of Separate Schools, and from other sources, was $35,019 — increase, $537. Total amount 
received from all sources was $127,549 — increase, $7,282. 

3. Expenditure. — For payment of teachers, $70,301 — increase, ^100; for ma) s, 
prize books and hbraries, $1,914 — decrease, $896 ; for sites and buildint;- School Houses, 
$25,864 ; for other School purposes, $22,479. 

^ 4. Pupils. — The number of pupils reported as attending the Separate Schools was 
25,280 — increase, 328. Average attendance, 13,172 — increase, 628. 

5. The whole number of teachers employed iu the Separate Schools was 333 — decrease, 
1 ; male teachers, 104 — decrease, 1 ; female teachers, 229. 

6. The same table shows the branches taught in the Separate Schools, and the num- 
ber of pupils in each branch ; also the number of schools using maps, &c. 

VII. — Table G. — High Schools, Receipts and Expenditure, Pupils, NusrsEF 

OF Schools. 

Beceipts. — The balances reported from the preceding year (that is, of moneys not paid 
out by the 31st December, 1878), were $13,810— decrease, $2,856. The amount received 
by the High School Boards from Legislative grant for the salaries of teachers, was 
$77,106 — increase, $1,947. The amount of Legislative grant apportioned for maps, prize 
hooks, etc., was .$1,796 — increase, $233. The amount of Municipal Grants iu support of 
High Schools was $202,848 — increase, $44,054. The amount received for pupnls' fees- 
was $21,581 — increase, $828. Balances of the preceding vear and other sources, $103,.- 
045— increase, $18,460. Total receipts. $420.188— increase, $62,667. 

E.rpenditure.- — For salaries of masters and teachers, $223,010 — increase, $11,402; 'or 
building, rent and repairs, $83,968 — increase, $32,551 ; for fuel, books and contingencif'S, 
$83,904 — increase, $7,606; for maps, prize books, apparatus and libraries, $5,126 — in- 
crease, $739. Total expenditure for the year 1878, $396,010— increase, $52,300. B.il- 
ance of moneys, not paid out at the end of the year, $24,178 — -increase, $10,367. 

Number of Pupils, 10,574 — increase, 1,346. 

Number of Schools, 104. 

Vni. — Table H. — High Schools, Number of Pupils in the Various Branches, 
Miscellaneous Information. — Head Masters and their Universities, 

Table H shows both the subjects taught and the number of pupils in each subject 
in each of the High Schools, the names, university degree (or certificate) of the H\T,d 
Master, and the number of masters employed in each School, &c. 

No. of Pupils. — In English Grammar and Literature, 10,486 ; in Compositimi 9,844 ; 
in Era Hug, Dictation and Elocution. 10,184; in Penmamhip, 7.683; in TAnear Drauing, 
2,881 ; in Book-keeping, 4,011 ; in Arithm£tic, 10,450; in Algebra, 10,212; in Geomrfry^ 

15 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



9,713 ; iu Mensuration, 5,383 ; in History, 9,855 ; in Georjrapluj, 10,074 ; in Natxiral Phil- 
osojihy, 2,375; iu CJwmistr)/, 2,919 ; iu Natural History, 242; in Physiology, 328; in 
French, 3,588; iu German, 516; in Latin, 4,729; in Greek, 88S ; in Gymnastics and 
Drill, 1,822. 

Of the Sehool-bouses, 74 were of brick, 20 stone, 10 frame ; 5 were rented or leased, 
the remainder freehold. The tendency everywhere is to improve the buildings and 
grounds required for High School purposes, so as to make each High School worthy of 
its now recognized position of being the local College. 

65 High Schools were under Union High and Public School Boards. The Grammar 
School at Kingston was established in 1791 ; at Cornwall, iu 1809 ; at Brockville, in 
1818; at Niagara, in 1808; at St. Catharines, in 1828. Many of the present High 
Schools and Collegiate Institutes represent the old Grammar Schools established iu the 
several Districts of the former Province of Upper Canada^ 2,068 maps were used in 
the 104 High Schools ; 55 Schools use the Bible ; in 89 there were daily prayers ; 183 
pupils matriculated at some University duriug 1878 ; 445 pupils entered mercantile life ; 
417 adopted agriculture as a pursuit ; 633 joined the learned professions ; 961 went to 
other occupations. The position of the High Schools as an essential and integral part 
of our educational system, is now well understood, as well as their practical value. 
They abundantly supply opportunities for secondary education, and thus protect the 
elementary schools from the tendency there would be in neglecting the manj', in order 
to advance the claver few who are su£ficientl,> advanced to call for instruction in second- 
ary subjects. They also constitute the necessary stepping stone between the Public 
Schools and tKo University, and upon their efficiency depends the success of our efforts 
in opening tl e avenues of learning to every child in the Province, as well as in affording 
to each youth of abihty the opportunity for the highest intellectual career. The High 
School is ii- tended to meet in each county the requisites of higher education, just as the 
Public Scl.ool in each section is established to furnish elementary instruction, and under 
the amei. led Regulations for the training of Public School Teachers, they, have be- 
come the chief means for educating candidates in the different subjects prescribed for 
the no:: -professional examination for Second and Third-class Public School Teachers" 
Certificates, while uniformity in their work has been secured by making the results of 
the Ii-termediate Examinations, equivalent to passmg such non- professional examination. 

IX. — Table I. — Normal and Model Schools. 

Table I contains three abstracts, the first of which gives the gross number of 
appHcations, tlie number that had been teachers before entering the Normal Schools, 
attendance of teachers-in-training, certificates, and other particulars respecting them ; 
the second abstract gives the counties (rom whence these students have come ; and the 
third gives the religious persuasion of these students. 

Table I shows that of the 8,022 students admitted (out of 8,853 applicants) to the 
Toronto Normal School since the beginning, 3,965 of them had been teachers- and of 
those admitted, 4,017 were males, and 4,005 were females. Of the 4,017 male candi- 
dates admitted, 2,689 of them had been teachers ; of the 4,005 female candidates ad- 
mitted, 1,276 of them had been teachers. The number admitted during the session of 
1878 was 139. Of these, 89 were males, and 50 females. Of the male students ad- 
mitted, 89 had been teachers; of the female students admitted, 41 had been teachers. 
Eighty-seven students were admitted to the third session of the Ottawa Normal School, 
51 males, 36 females, 65 of them had been teachers before, 41 males, 24 females. 

Table I contains abstracts in connection with the twenty-eight years' existence of the 
Normal School at Toronto, to show the total number of applications, certificates obtained, 
the Counties whence the students came, and their religions persuasions. Also, an ab- 
stract ot the students admitted at the Normal School at Ottawa. The conditions under 
which Public School Teachers' Certificates were formerly granted have been changed by 
the Amended Pi'^gulations which came into effect in Augast, 1877, and Table I, with 
Appendix G, contains the information applicable to these new conditions. The Normal 
Schools at Toronto and Oitawa are now confined to the professional training of candi- 
dates for Second-Class Certificates, while in each County of the Province, one or mor-.i 

16 



43 Victoria. Sessional Pcapers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



County Model Schools have been established for the professional training of candidates 
for Third-Class Certificates, details of which will be found in Appendix Gr. In the Nor- 
mal School the session for the instruction of candidates for First-Class Certificates 
extends throughout the Academic year, from September to July, and is literary and 
scientific, and also professional — but attendance is optional — while for Second-Class 
Certificates the attendance is obligatory on all candidates during one of three se3sions of 
t\,elve weeks each into which the Academic year is divided. The whole time of each 
session is devoted exclusively to instruction in the theory and practice of teaching. Suc- 
cessful candidates are entitled to be repaid out of Provincial Funds for their travelling 
expenses. In the County Model Schools the candidate who has passed the examination 
in the prescribed literary and scientific subjects for Third-Class Certificates is required 
to be instructed in the actual j)ractice of teaching for one term at least, and he must 
also satisfactorily pass this examination in order to obtain his Third-Class Certificate. • 
At the examinations of 1878 there were : 

(1) 1st Class Candidates of Normal School, Toronto, 15 in number of whom 12 passed. 

(2) do do do Ottawa, 9 do do none do 

(3) 2nd Class do do Toronto, 137 do do 136 do 
(-t) do do do Ottawa, 108 do do 108 do 

Appendix C shows the following results of the two terms of the County Model 
Schools which were in operation from September till the end of the year 1878, viz : — No. 
of Schools, 50; No. of Third-Class Candidates in attendance, 1,391; No. rejected by 
Board of Examiners, 52. 

X. — Table J. — Free Public Libraries. 

1. The amount expended in library books during 1878, was $5,783, of which one- 
half has been provided from local sources. The number of volumes supplied was 6,796. 

2. The value of Public free libraries furnished to the end of 1878, was $174,785. 
The number of Libraries, exclusive of subdivisions, 1,538. The number of volumes in 

these libraries was 294,931. 

8. Number and classification of public libraries and prize books ivhich have been scut out 
from the Depository of the Department from 1853 to 1878 inclusive. The total number of 
volumes for Public Free Libraries sent outi, 284,931. The classification of these books is 
as follows : — History, 49,187 ; Zoology and Fhysioloyy, 16,868 ; Botany, 3,058 ; Phenomena, 
6,963 ; Physical Science, 5,213 ; Geology, 2,481 ; Natural Philosophy and JSlaniifdCtures, 
14,313; Chemistry, 2,593; Practical Agriculture, 10,571; Literature, 28,872; Voyages, 
27,226; Biography, 32,734; Tales and Sketches, Practical Life, 82,968; Fiction, 4,813; 
Teachers' Library, 7071 ; Total number of Prize Books sent out, 1,022,038; Grand Total 
q/" library and prize books (including, but not included in the above, 34,751 volumes sent 
to Mechanics' Institutes and Sunday Schools, paid for wholly from local sources), 1,351,- 
720. 

XI.— Table K. — Summary of Maps, Apparatus, and Prize Books Supplied to the 
Counties, Cities, Towns and Villages during the year. 

1. The amount expended by the Education Departirent in supplying maps, appara- 
tus, and prize books for the Schools, $38,467 — decrease, $2,863. The one-half of these 
sums was provided voluntarily from local sources ; in all cases the books oi articles are 
applied for, and fifty per cent, of the value paid for by the parties concerned. The num- 
ber of Maps of the World sent out was 302, of Europe, 308; of Asia, 238; of Africa, 204 ; 
of America, 503 ; of British North America, and Canada, 366 ; of Great Britain and 
Ireland, 192 ; Scriptural and Classical, 86 ; of other charts and maps, 941 ; of globes, 
809; of other pieces of school apparatus, 4,816; of Historical and other Lessons, in 
sheets, 26,612. Number of Prize Books, 52,573. 

2. From 1855 to the end of 1878, the amount expended for maps, apparatus, and 
prize books (not including Public Libraries), was $622,115. The number of maps of 
the World furnished was 7,108 ; of Furope, 6,931 ; of Asia, 5,028; of Africa, 5,028; of 
America, 6,529 ; of British North America and Canada, 1 ,4t.Tl) Great Britain and Ireland, 

17 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. ^k) 



A. 1880 



5,390; of Classical and Scriptural Maps, 3,664 ; other Maps and Charts, 11,209 ; Globes, 
3.707 ; single articles of school apparatus, 37,049 ; Historical and other Lessons, vi sheets, 
339,992; Volumes of Prize Books, 1,022,038. 

(1) Table Shewing the Value of Articles sent out from the Education De- 
pository DURING THE YeARS 1851 TO 1878, INCLUSIVE. 



I Articles on which the 100 per cent, has been 
apportioned from the Legislative Orant. 



YEAR. 



Public School Library 
Books. 



1851. 

1852. 

1853. 

1854. 

1855. 

1856. 

1857. 

1858. 

1859. 

1860. 

1861. 

1862. 

1863. 

1864. 

1865. 

1866. 

1867. 

1868. 

1869. 

1870 

1871. 

1872. 

1873. 

1874. 

1875. 

1876. 

1877. 

1878. 



Dollars. 



51,376 
9,947 
7,205 

16,200 
3,982 
5,805 
5,289 
4,084 
3,273 
4,022 
1,931 
2,400 
4,.375 
3,404 
4,420 
4,655 
3,396 
3,300 
4,421 
3,834 
5,337 
5,610 
.5,434 
5,537 
5,783 



Maps, Apparatus, and ' ^ , 
Prize Books. ' ^""^^^ 



Articles sold at 
Catalogue prices 
without any ap- 
portionment from 
the Legislative 



Dollars. 



4,655 
9,320 
18,118 
11,810 
11,905 
16,832 
16,251 
16,194 
15,887 
17,260 
20,224 
27,114 
28,270 
25,923 
24,475 
28,810 
30,076 
42,265 
42,902 
44,631 
46,114 
43,284 
4l,.330 
38,467 



Total value of Lib- 
rary, Prize & School 
Books, Maps and 
Apparatus des- 
patched. 



Dollars. 
l;414 
2,981 
4,233 
5,514 
4,389 
5,726 
6,4.52 
6,972 
6,679 
5,416 
4,894 
4,844 
3,461 
4,454 
3,818 
4,172 
7,419 
4,793 
5,678 
6,175 
8,138 
10,481 
7,010 
8,547 
10,445 
12,116 
11,531 
8,974 



Dollars. 
1,414 
2,981 
4,2.33. 
56,890 
18,991 
22,251 
40,770 
22,754 
24,389 
27,537 
25,229 
24,311 
23,370 
23,645 
26,442 
35,661 
39,093 
35,136. 
34,808 
38,381 
41,514 
57,167 
5.3,746 
58,515- 
62,109 
60,834 
58 398 
53,224 



18 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



(2) Imports of Books into Oxtario and Quebec. 

The following Statistical Table has been compiled from the " Trade and ISTavigation 
Returns," for the year specified, showing the gross value of Books (not Maps or School 
Apparatus) imported into Ontario and Quebec. 



YEAR. 


j Value of Books en- 

i tered at ports in the 

Province of Quebec. 


Value of Book^en- 
tered at port.s in the 
Province of Ontario. 


Total value of Books 
imported into the two 
Provinces. 


Proportion imported 
for the Education De- 
partment of Ontario. 




Dollars. 


Dollars. 


Dollars. 


Dollars. 


1850 


101,880 


141,700 


243,580 


84 


1851 


120,700 


171,732 


292,432 


3,296 


1852 


141,176 


159,268 


300,444 


1,288 


1853 


ir8,710 


254,270 


412,980 


22,764 


1854 


171,452 


307,808 


479,260 


44,060 


1855 


194,356 


338,792 


533,148 


25,624 


1856 


208,636 


427,992 


636,628 


10,208 


1857 


224,400 


309,172 


533,572 


16,028 


1858 


171,255 


191,942 


368,197 


10,692 


1859 


139,057 


184,304 


323,361 


5,308 


1860 


155,604 


252,504 


408,108 


8,846 


1861 


185,612 


344,621 


530,233 


7,782 


1862 


183,977 


249,2.34 


433,211 


7,800 


1863 


184,652 


276,673 


461,325 


4,085 


i of 1864 . . 


93,308 


127,233 


220,541 


4,668 


1864-1865 . . 


189,386 


200,304 


389,690 


9,522 


1865-1866 . . 


222,559 


247,749 


490,308 


14,749 


1866-1867 . . 


223,837 


273,615 


497,452 


20,743 


1867-1868 . . 


224,582 


254,048 


478,630 


12,374 


1868-1869 . . 


278,914 


373,758 


652,072 


11,874 


1869-1870 . . 


220,371 


351,171 


671,542 


13.019 


1870-1871 . 


146, 4a5 


411,518 


557,953 


13,078 


1871-1872 . . 


212,644 


477,.581 


690,225 


20,315 


18-^2-1873 . . 


221,978 


540,143 


762,121 


16,597 


1873-1874 . . 


246,926 


530,434 


777,360 


16,789 


1874-1875 . . 


246,828 


570,970 


817,798 


22,970 


1875-1876 . . 


210,196 


489,777 


699,973 1 


17,893 


1876-1877 . . 


221,-554 


496,729 


718,283 


24,790 


1877-1878.. 


233,789 


462,315 


696,104 


10,358 



19 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



XII. — Table L. — Superannuated Teachers of Public Schools. 

1. This table shows the age and service of each Public School Teacher who was in 
receipt of his superannuation allowance at the end of the year 1878, and the amount 
which he receives. The system, according to which aid is given to Superannuated 
Public School teachers, is as follows : — in 1853, the Legislature appropriated $2,000, 
which it afterwards increased to $4,000, and then to $6,000 ; on the adoption of the 
system of compulsory subscriptions, which increased the revenue to $11,800, for 1873 
the vote was again increased, and for 1878 was $35,500. The allowance cannot exceed 
$6.00 annually for each year the recipient* has taught School in Ontario, except in cases 
of High School Masters, Inspectors of Public or High Schools, or teachers holding First or 
Second Class Certificates, when a further allowance at the rate of one dollar for each year 
of such service is granted. Each recipient must pay a subscription to the Fund of $4 for 
the current year, and $5 for each year of service in arrear since, and inclusive of, 1854 ; 
nor can any teacher share in the fund unless he pays annually at that rate, commencing 
at the time of his beginning to teach. 

2. It appears from the Table that 533 persons have been admitted to receive aid, of 
whom 194 have died, have not been heard from, have resumed teaching, or have with- 
drawn from the fund before or during the year 1878, the amount of their subscriptions 
having been returned to them. Of tJae 533 admitted, 497 were males, 36 females. 

3. The superannuation allowance is regulated by the provisions contained in the 
Public Schools Act (Eevised Statutes, Chap. 205) Sec. 44 to 49 inclusive. 

Xin. — Table M. — Educational Summary. 

This Table shows the number of Public Educational Institutions, the number of 
students and pupils attending them, and the amount expended in their support as far as 
returns have been obtained. The whole number of these institutions in 1878 was 5,098 
— decrease 150 ; the whole number of students and pupils attending them was 500,489 — 
decrease 500; the total amount expended for all educational purposes was $3,520,841. 
Total amount available for educational purposes, $3,902,974 — decrease, $47,923. 

XTV. — Table N. — General Statistical Abstract of the Progress of Education 
IN Ontario, from 1842 to 1878, inclusive. 

This Table supplies the material for comparing tlie number and character of Edu- 
cational Institutions at difi"erent periods, the number of pupils attending them, and the 
sums of money provided and expended for their support. 

By analyzing and comparing these statistics, a correct appreciation can be formed 
of what has been accomplished educationally in Ontario during the last thirty years. 
For example : in 1842, the number of Public Schools was only 1,721. In 1851, this 
had increased to 3,001; and in 1878, to 4,990; and the number of pupils attending 
them from 168,159 in 1851, to 489,015 in 1878. The amount paid for the support of 
Pubhc Schools has been increased fro'm $468,644 in 1851, to $2,889,347 in 1878 (not 
including balance?, not paid at the date of the date of the local reports), including the 
amount paid for the purchase, erection, repairs of School-houses and for other purposes, 
of Avhich there are no reports earlier than 1850, but which at that time amounted to 
only $56,755, and $77,336 in 1851, but which in 1878 amounted to $878,139, making 
the aggregate actually paid for Public School purposes in 1878, with the balances 
available and not paid out at the date of the local reports, $3,247,322. 



20 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No, 5.) 



A. 1880 







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43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



XV. — The Educational Museum. 

The Educational Museum forms a valuable part of our system of popular education. 
It consists of a collection of School apparatus for Public and High Schools, of models of 
agricultural and other implements, of sj)ecimens of the natural history of the country, 
casts of antique and modern statues and busts, including busts of celebrated characters 
in English and French history, also, copies and engravings of some of the works of the 
great masters of the Dutch, Flemish, Spanish, and especially of the Italian Schools of 
painting. It also contains many objects of improved School appliances and architecture, 
as well as collections for promoting art, science and literature. 

Conclusion. 

The repnrt for the year 1876 mentioned that in February of that year a responsible 
Minister had succeeded the former Chief Superintendent in the administration of the 
affairs of the Education Department, and that the functions of the late Council of Public 
Instruction had been vested in a Committee of the Executive Council. lu order to meet 
the wants of the Public and High Schools, as well as to improve the facilities for train- 
ing Public School Teachers, amendments to the law in several material particulars were 
passed by the Legislature in its next ensuing session, and Eegulations to give these 
amendments practical effect, as well as to further improve the etficiency of our Schools, 
were considered and adopted by Your Honour in Council, so as to take effect at the end 
of the summer vacation of 1877. The amendments in the Law were incorporated in the 
Eevised Statutes of the Province, and by the liberality of the Legislature, a compendium 
containing all the Laws and Regulations respecting the Public and High Schools of 
Ontario, has now been placed in the hands of all the School Boards, Corj)orations and 
Officials in the Province. The important changes and revisions which, in 1877, were 
made in the Law and Piegulations, can be best understood by reference to the text con- 
tained in the compendium, but the results may be concisely stated here. 

The principal changes made in the Law were as follows : — 

L — ^The Education Department was authorized : 

1. To grant equivalents in the examination of Public School Teachers for passing 
High Sc^iool Examinations. 

2. To establish County Model Schools. 

3. To prescribe regulations as to Elementary teaching, and to make certain subjects 
optional. 

4. To require as a further condition for Teachers' Certificates, that they should 
also possess a knowledge of teaching to be gained in County Model Schools or in the 
Normal School. 

5. To grant Sacoud, as well as First-class, Certificates to Teachers, after examination 
by the Central Committee, the power of County Boards being limited in future to grant- 
ing Third-class Certificates. 

6. To restrain the granting of Permits and of renewals of Third-class Certificates. 

7. To regulate and encourage Teachers' Associations. 

8. To pay the travelling expenses of students at the Normal Schools, being candi- 
dates for Second-class Certificates. 

The Public School Law was amended in many important particulars, amongst 
which may be mentioned : — 

1. Power given to Trustees of Eural Schools to require Township Councils to pass 
the requisite By-law for borrowing money on time. 

22 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



2. Special provisions for facilitatiug the formation of Township Boards, and for 
theii' dissolution, if found unsatisfactory. 

3. Full power given to Township Councils in the formation, dissolution, and altera- 
tion of School Sections in the same part. 

4. Also as to unions between parts of one Township and another Municipality or 
Municipalities, by which to secure this ia a more just and equitable manner, and in which 
the authority of the Township Councils has been restored. 

5. School Trustees can pay their Teachers quarterly and borrow money in anticipa- 
tion of the annual rate therefor, and the County Council is similarly authorized. 

6. Tlie Municipal Councils are now bound, through their Municipal officials, to as- 
sess and collect all school rates, both for Public and Separate School purposes. 

In regard to High Schools theu* position was permanently secured by preventing 
High School Districts being formed in the future, by giving the County Councils the 
power to discontinue existing Districts, anl by making all High Schools, County Schools ; 
and by requiring the County Council to raio..' towards the annual maintenance of the 
High School, at least an amount equal to that received from the Legislative Grant, and 
by requiring the Town or other Municij)ality ia which the High School was situate to 
meet the whole cost of building and other school accommodation, as well as further sums 
for maintenance. 

II. — The Regulations as revised and amended introduced the following amongst 
other imj)rovements : — 

1. Those as to Rural School accommodation were modified and declared to be re- 
commendatory rather than obligatory, except in cases of wilful omission or neglect, and 
to be carried out so far as the circumstances of each section might enable them to be 
eomplied with, without pressing unduly upon its resources. 

2. The conditions for obtaining Certificates to teach in the Public Schools require ; 

(1) For Third-Class Certificates, the age of eighteen for males, and seventeen for 
females, a wider range of subjects for the non-professional examination, including Euclid 
And Algebra, and attendance upon, and successfully passing in, the County Model School. 

(2) For Second-Class Certificates, to pass not only the prescribed non-professional 
examination (in which the subjects of the latermediate High School examinations are 
taken as equivalent), but also to have attended one session at one of the Normal Schools, 
and having passed the professional examination on the theory and practice of teaching. 

(3) For First-Ciass Certificates, opportunities are afforded in the Normal Schools 
for obtaining instruction in the prescribed literary and scientific subjects, as well as in 
those which are professional, and a higher standard has also been imposed. 

3. The powers of management by School Boards and Trustees have been made more 
flexible, especially by abolishing the General Time or Limit Table, and leaving this to 
be regulated by the Trustees and Teacher. The Programme or Course of Study is to 
be subjoct to the circumstances of the particular School, and the Inspector is instructed 
to permit of such modifications as thereupon may become necessary. 

4. The list of Text Books has been extended by such additions as were urgently 
demanded by the Schools, while others, which experience had proved to be unnecessary, 
have been omitted. The Schools should now be able lo supply themselves with books 
satisfactory in quality as well as reasonable in price, and properly printed and bound. 

6. The work of the Normal Schools having been confined to the professional train- 
ing for Sucond-Class Certificates, and to such as may be candidates for First-Ciass Cer- 
tificates, is governed by special regulations, while that of the County Model Schools is 
Bimilarly regul ted. 

6. The uniform examination and classification of all Candidates for Teachers' Cer- 
tificates arc fully secured by the regulations under which every detail is provided for, and 
by the assistance of sub examiners the Central Committee is able to report promptly upon 
the results of the examinations for Second-Class Certificate^ and the Intermediate, at 
the High Schools. Ail Examiners are instructed that the examination tests are applied 

23 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



to ascertain, not the comparative merits of individual candidates amongst tliemsehcB, 
but whether the candidate possesses a satisfactory amount of knowledge in the prescribed 
subjects, and that the standard in eash subject should be regulated accordingly. 

7. Increased efficiency has been given to Teachers' Associations in their valuable 
work of self- improvement, and encouragement in educational progress. 

The amendments in the Law and Eegulations only came into operation during the 
last half ( f the year 1877, and some of the results are seen in the experience of this 
year 1878. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your Honour's obedient servant, 

ADAM CKOOKS, 

Minister of Education. 

Education Department (Ontario), 
Toronto, October, 1879. 



24 



4b Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



I'ji^E.T II, 



STATISTICAL REPORT 

1878. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE A.— The Public 





RECEIPTS. 


COUNTIES. 

(Including incorporated Villages, 
but not Cities or Towns. ) 


r5 > 

\ e1 

H.I 


03 C3 i^ 





1 ^ 
1 "3 S 

11 


< 



CO 

-i 

a; OB 

r- a> 


<D m 
&■ a) 2 

<U 13 >- 
■n c3 g 

<"— i 

^"T^ 
it S_, 




Glengarry , 

Stormont 

Dundas 


$ c. 

3086 50 
2481 50 
29 .'0 00 
3045 00 
1370 00 
45'^2 75 
2954 00 
4807 50 
4650 00 
5206 00 
4937 00 
3900 50 
2704 00 
7298 50 
5331 00 
4312 00 
3659 50 
1567 00 
6495 72 
7009 00 
9097 50 
3.521 00 
10709 61 
2956 00 
4151 00 
2789 00 
29.54 50 
3149 .50 
3444 50 
4337 50 
5699 00 
4713 50 
8225 50 
7890 00 
5440 00 
8607 00 
6913 .50 
9361 50 
4642 00 
5017 50 
4927 50 
3921 00 
4770 25 


$ c. 

104 80 

59 20 

180 02 

77 53 

23 00 

266 09 

232 30 

179 08 

385 64 

165 53 

155 03 

168 55 

170 08 

295 45 
351 39 
3-10 23 

76 62 
52 32 
175 46 
640 93 
685 SO 
365 51 
. 694 03 

296 88 
298 79 
237 00 

95 18 
334 44 
185 50 
293 75 
720 18 
194 10 
408 15 
578 49 
523 75 
819 18 
469 68 
897 44 
350 44 
374 00 
544 10 
256 97 
187 11 


S c. 
2877 03 
2493 50 
5447 87 
4209 09 
2011 75 
5595 28 
5245 03 
6482 97 

10665 60 

6828 35 

, 5266 66 

5110 93 

3450 26 

10005 93 
9311 82 
.5060 25 
5574 39 
1006 05 
9777 20 

17256 22 

18388 82 
5890 74 

14006 05 
7273 97 
4121 78 
2860 33 
9365 65 
6629 58 
7817 03 
4286 83 
6645 44 
8867 61 

29025 43 
7759 08 
5440 94 

19833 33 

16719 23 

21999 03 
8851 00 

15426 57 
7741 92 
7018 90 
1635 00 


% c. 
13483 85 
15945 01 
17585 85 

7784 52 
12923 23 
330^8 99 
13690 51 
30920 30 
23136 88 
24536 69 
23385 39 
19542 28 
19544 45 
34814 58 
35154 77 
34939 15 
22709 67 

41.54 47 
35:^19 -to 
43422 01 
57183 60 
24327 47 
66750 43 
20102 87 
27162 23 
20964 93 
20162 65 
20265 36 
22186 16 
34224 87 
59307 53 
3M25 23 
53609 72 
68633 08 
45930 04 
7282S 65 
54754 18 
72785 27 
34.S24 57 
41606 52 
50118 46 
33036 59 
10334 34 


S c. 
2376 25 
2106 48 
2871 34 
4O118 70 


Kussell 

Carleton 

Grenville 


3235 27 

10150 90 

93' 1 04 




10851 64 


Lanark 

P.enfrew 


7298 37 
7329 20 
5684 33 


Lennox and Addington 

Prince Edward 


8612 79 

6904 84 

18934 97 


Northumberland 

Durham 

Peterborough 

Haliburton 

Victoria 

Ontario .... 


11495 .54 

6167 20 

7254 93 

2878 97 

146t8 74 

13147 95 


York 

Peel 

Simcoe , '. 

Halton 

W^entworth 


40775 57 
9529 55 

14272 50 
92.50 90 

11847 09 


Brant 

Lincoln , . . . 

Welland 


121)58 30 
17132 92 
17924 20 




12599 91 


Norfolk , 

Oxford 

Waterloo 

Wellington 

Grey 

Perth . . 

Huron 


13751 30 
15697 67 
20207 78 
16562 70 
15275 90 
15418 26 
24728 78 
26478 11 


Middlesex 

Elgin 


29568 P5 
15153 04 


Kent 

Lambton 

Essex 


12254 82 
21712 24 
11750 24 




4238 60 






Total 


208475 83 


13799 72 


3612.S0 44 


1405686 80 


5434.58 48 


CITIES. 
Belleville 


11.^8 .50 
1300 50 
4115 00 
1984 50 
242ii 00 
3218 00 
1314 50 1 
8310 50 


36 00 

210 20 

50 00 

26 95 

92 88 

50 50 

8 63 

261 03 


12416 55 
116.S5 54 
39040 01 
13691 97 
~^ 14630 96 
34611 25 
14350 00 
130971 30 




2217 64 
2364 41 






79>6 75 


Kingston 




2258 63 


London 




ll(i75 87 






29602 02 


St. Catharines 


1947 69 


Toronto i 




7586 11 


Total - . . . ' 


23827 50 


736 19 


271347 58 

1 




65579 12 


1 







26 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



Schools of Ontario. 





EXPENDITURES. 


for 
lool 


-a 


S 55,5 -2 


2| 


^kl . 


-2 2 




IS 

■S.2 

3= s 


.a 

a 

^.2 


" CO 


Sites, and Bi 
ig School-hov 


• Rent and 
airs. Colled 
'ees. Fuel 
ther expenses 


^ o 

'3 SB* 


Balance. 


C " '^ 


c 3 


3 ^H^ .s 


o — ' 


3 c.^ o 


"c v£ - 




^ 


^ 


f^ 


^ 


f^ 


H "" 




§ c. 


S c. 


$ c. 


S c. 


S c. 


S c. 


$ c. 


21928 43 


17243 78 


209 87 


760 08 


2167 76 


20381 49 


1.546 94 


230.S5 69 


16749 05 


118 60 


25:« 77 


2135 92 


21542 34 


1543 35 


29005 08 


22116 50 


360 04 


1749 87 


2407 92 


26634 33 


2370 75 


19124 84 


12521 73 


155 06 


2381 32 


1596 21 


lti654 32 


2470 52 


19563 25 


139' 13 54 


141 48 


1801 64 


1817 94 


17664 60 


1898 65 


53554 01 


36606 66 


979 11 


5142 17 


5450 62 


48178 56 


5375 45 


31422 88 


19645 77 


464 60 


4024 66 


3439 81 


27574 84 


3848 04 


53241 49 


36804 77 


522 50 


4323 89 


5465 26 


47116 42 


6125 07 


46136 49 


33552 02 


938 62 


2428 92 


5146 02 


42065 58 


4070 91 


440t;5 77 


29940 85 


681 13 


5736 46 


3967 52 


40325 96 


3739 79 


39428 41 


27771 41 


333 98 


2827 32 


4691 44 


35624 15 


3804 26 


37335 05 


27660 60 


337 10 


1815 84 


4188 79 


34002 33 


3332 72 


32773 63 


26438 52 


340 16 


2247 16 


3390 48 


32416 32 


357 31 


71349 43 


44578 67 


590 90 


11737 94 


6602 87 


63510 38 


78:^9 05 


61644 52 


40796 32 


702 78 


5687 72 


6817 49 


54004 31 


7640 21 


50838 83 


37082 69 


660 46 


3147 51 


4980 96 


45871 62 


4967 21 


39275 11 


26t)14 56 


204 95 


515Q 01 


3817 79 


35817 31 


3457 80 


9658 81 


5602 97 


132 37 


14.M 88 


978 63 


81(i5 85 


1492 96 


65S26 57 


39645 66 


499 65 


13109 83 


82t;l 13 


61516 27 


3810 30 


81376 11 


54930 24 


1124 02 


68:-i2 84 


11222 97 


74110 07 


7266 04 


126131 29 


7-0445 61 


1508 58 


17309 76 


149:!!3 85 


109 JO) 80 


16930 49 


43634 27 


29772 14 


731 02 


2560 53 


5492 73 


38556 42 


5077 85 


106432 62 


73450 66 


2116 95 


12571 48 


10035 26 


98174 35 


8258 27 


398S0 62 


26908 72 


593 76 


4572 21 


5063 50 


37128 19 


274i 43 


47580 89 


31777 18 


658 94 


3090 40 


5047 60 


40574 12 


7006 77 


3S909 56 


25331 15 


592 97 


1622 71 


355 97 


27902 80 


11006 76 


49710 90 


26ii53 98 


270 77 


5708 97 


5643 21 


38276 93 


114.33 97 


48303 08 


27257 04 


736 88 


3440 64 


5974 20 


37408 76 


10S94 34 


4K233 10 


29553 05 


371 00 


5312 32 


4726 .54 


39962 91 


6270 19 


56891 25 


35677 76 


633 89 


7ol7 78 


5.i81 08 


49010 51 


78S3 74 


79069 82 


52089 .56 


1440 36 


89)4 34 


9104 27 


715.38 53 


7531 29 


72108 22 


46632 80 


614 70 


2957 :h9 


6762 76 


56967 65 


15140 57 


107831 50 


67.-95 05 


1004 90 


17986 94 


11367 58 


98254 47 


9577 03 


100136 55 


66115 93 


1252 25 


11366 48 


11983 95 


90718 61 


9417 94 


72752 99 


44680 55 


1072 84 


12789 32 


6185 86 


64728 57 


8024 42 


126816 94 


80182 25 


1722 88 


23910 55 


10090 71 


115906 39 


10910 55 


105334 70 


61618 07 


939 76 


20 75 19 


11114 63 


94447 65 


10887 05 


134611 89 


80687 53 


2080 55 


2 -.8 14 74 


14429 23 


123012 05 


IV.'J.) 84 


63!21 05 


40411 49 


1300 78 


7964 49 


7354 28 


57031 04 


629 J 01 


74(i79 41 


46178 52 


933 87 


8293 29 


9071 74 


64477 42 


10201 99 


85044 22 


50068 61 


1206 70 


15508 91 


10137 65 


76921 87 


8122 35 


55983 70 


.3473(3 53 


1326 52 


7480 56 


6827 03 


50370 64 


5 )13 06 


21165 30 


11857 91 


374 22 


3160 57 


3092 13 


J8484 83 


2680 47 


2532701 27 


1635188 40 


32982 47 


315015 40 


269056 29 


2252242 56 


280458 71 


15828 69 


9930 79 


74 05 


1575 00 


4189 79 


1.5769 63 


59 06 


15510 65 


97-^2 72 


420 40 


1369 02 


3928 77 


15440 91 


69 54 


51131 76 


27872 66 


3490 26 


6840 74 


12750 04 


5095 5 70 


178 06 


]79(;2 05 


9820 03 


221 .50 


142 ) 09 


4667 14 


1612S 76 


1833 29 


2S,S25 71 


13953 69 


213 70 


88 70 


8681 39 


22937 48 


5888 23 


674S1 77 


23851 71 


509 60 


15713 .51 


14613 21 


54688 03 


12793 74 


17620 82 


10974 00 


17 2<i 


1935 68 


4598 95 


17525 89 


94 93 


147128 94 


6;)865 50 


697 98 


32619 61 


22.521 83 


12.5704 92 


21424 02 


361490 39 


175991 10 


5644 75 


61562 35 


75951 12 


319149 32 


' 42341 07 



27 



43 Yictbria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE A.— The PubHc 



TOWNS. 



Amherstburgh . 

Barrie 

Berlin 

Both well 

Bowmanville . 
Brampton . . . 

Brockville 

Chatham 

Clifton 

Clinton 

Cobourg 

CoUingwood . . . 

Cornwall 

Dundas 

Durham 

Gait 

Goderich 

Guelph . . . . 

IngersoU 

Kincardine . . . 

Lindsay 

Listowel 

Meaf ord 

Milton 

Mitchell 

Napanee 

Niagara 

Oakville ... 
Orangeville . . . 
Orillia ... . 
Owen Sound . . . 
Palmerston . . . 

Paria , 

Perth ... ^ .... 
Peterboro'' .... 

Petrolia 

Picton 

Port Hope 

Prescott 

Sandwich .... 

Samia 

Seaforth 

Simcoe 

St. Mary's . . . 
St. Thomas . . 

Stratford 

Strathroy 

Thorold 

Tilsonburgh . . 
Walkerton . . 
Waterloo .... 
Welland .... 

Whitby 

Windsor 

Woodstock . . 



RECEIPTS. 



Total. 



is '3) 



297 
724 
604 
147 
448 
4.5H 
846 
960 
241 
447 
781 
417 
461 
4(6 
297 
669 
732 
1084 
791 
3M 
752 
146 
2.il 
234 
266 
.537 
269 
251 
21.5 
195 
646 
163 
393 
452 
787 
392 
397 
906 
541 
172 
587 
200 
424 
461 
573 
838 
.576 
246 
236 
357 
235 
316 
502 
777 
7^7 



-.2 • =3 

(T. C "^ '-' 



c. 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

50 

50 

50 

00 

50 

00 

50 

00 

00 

00 

50 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 I 

00 I 

00 I 

00 

50 I 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 i 

50 

00 

00 

00 

50 

00 

50 

00 

00 

50 

zo 

00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
50 
00 
00 



48 00 
27 39 
25 50 



5 00 
14 20 
70 10 


"'26'66 


29 89 


"'i8'25 


"16.3 98 
25 26 


"ioos 


' ' '37 33 



36 17 

'47 50 
30 11 
20 75 
70 00 

'.56 50 



47 80 
10 00 
17 50 
25 00 



26235 50 



50 00 



88 00 
70 00 



1220 74 



61 29 I 
24 67 

'24 66 I 

28 00 
18 50 






4122 
85(15 
5937 
1442 
2000 
3450 
5688 

11800 
24 09 
3000 
5050 
5363 
578 
4040 
1800 
6726 
5387 

136ti4 
5829 
4434 
6022 
5104 
2.!-00 
21 
2893 
3670 
1133 
1915 



3660 00 
5".33 66 
2079 73 
.33 9 65 
3724 57 
8995 78 
3450 00 
3992 00 
6488 25 
3411 72 
1995 83 
5390 HI 
3200 00 
2084 12 
2852 29 
4468 32 
154' CO 
4500 00 
3870 70 
911 05 
1329 20 
2650 00 
253ii 36 
4153 60 
8988 30 
4100 00 

239726 59 



to <D 



I § 



it s— . 
!- 3 a 

o 



S c. 
1753 01 
1104 00 

537 26 
162a 20 
1632 40 

148 82 
1 77 96 
9355 73 
2412 51 

596 08 

441 15 

674 99 

4118 27 

1975 30 

69 08 

2313 44 

267 70 
1512 97 
2502 46 
1364 63 
181 .7 69 

136 37 
29 05 

1024 16 
2427 54 

113 00 

923 10 

486 68 

4816 34 

45 00 

294 65 

2 33 

1037 27 

1991 16 

3319 73 

119 27 

630 70 

10 00 

1019 26 

42 24 

10054 44 

1765 58 

"4589 '88 

1658 24 

152 90 

180 84 

1348 26 

1376 86 

4128 23 

321 34 

1025 03 
218 60 

1082 96 
2037 66 

85947 32 



28 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



Schools of Ontario — Continued. 



j EXPENDITURE. 


S-^a 1 


^ 


■ r3^ 1 


T^ 1» 1 


C3 ^ T5 \ 


£-3 i 




3 o . 

O — CO 

<P -, o 


or Teachers' Sa 
aries. 


or Maps, Appa 
atus. Prizes an 
Libraries, inclu 
ing 100 per cent. 


or Sites and Bull 
ing School-house 


or Rent and R 
pairs, Collectoi 
Fees, Fuel an 
other expenses. 


otal Expenditu 
or all Public Scho 
Durposes. 


Balance. 


H 


^ 1 


Pm 


N 1 


*^ 


H 




§ c. 


S c. 1 


S c. 


$ c. 1 


S 0. 


$ c. 


S c. 


6220 96 


2750 00 


309 74 


1849 35 


931 38 


5840 47 


380 49 


10361 30 


5614 76 


54 78 


2-00 00 


863 76 


8733 30 


1628 00 


7104 36 


4830 35 


391 89 


65 38 


1738 43 


7026 05 


78 .31 


3212 34 


1418 80 






611 67 


2030 47 


1181 87 


4080 40 


2750 00 


75 34 


i70 66 


550 88 


3546 22 


534 18 


4054 82 


2500 00 


19 00 


3U0 00 


1165 60 


3984 60 


70 22 


7818 18 


5708 04 


10 00 1 




2026 19 


7744 23 


73 95 


22130 43 


90U0 05 


54 20 


3690 00 


3529 11 


16273 36 


5857 07 


5133 11 


2110 00 


140 20 




461 87 


2712 07 


2421 04 


4043 08 


3083 67 


14 00 


2S 00 


862 12 


3987 79 


55 29 


6272 65 


4519 64 


60 00 


18) 11 


1323 20 


6; 182 95 


189 70 


6455 00 


4411 20 




58) i^8 


951 90 


5943 98 


511 02 


5178 .52 1 


2490 00 


40 00 


950 00 


1214 65 


4694 ti5 


483 S7 


6482 23 


3289 76 1 




2 00 


2306 21 


5597 97 


884 26 


2166 08 


1300 00 




568 00 


298 08 


2166 Co 




9739 16 


5704 83 


60 53 


369 98 


1246 18 


73s 1 52 


2357 64 


6:^88 14 


4416 12 


10 00 




1849 87 


6275 99 


112 15 


16279 45 


8399 99 


56 75 


1879 16 


5901 76 


16237 66 


41 79 


9122 48 


5019 67 


13 40 


448 26 


1.573 13 


6854 46 


22R8 02 


6179 63 


3299 50 




1515 00 


1132 00 


5946 .50 


233 13 


8805 94 


5827 11 


526 55 


462 80 


1379 48 


8195 94 


610 00 


5411 63 


2435 25 


54 22 


2237 08 


610 38 


5336 93 


74 70 


27.-0 05 


1960 00 
1505 72 


"24 io 




441 85 
290 82 


2401 85 
2179 64 


378 20 


3368 84 


359 00 


1189 20 


5586 54 


2915 08 




824 60 





3739 68 


1846 86 


43-'0 00 


3242 76 






969 63 


4212 39 


107 61 


2326 08 


1118 75 






342 12 


1460 87 


865 21 


2691 45 


1789 87 


74 66 


6 00 


284 35 


2154 88 


536 57 


5031 34 


2462 86 




44 07 


2.524 41 


5031 34 




39111 29 


2742 47 


134 49 




992 28 


3869 24 


92 65 


6498 98 


4338 00 


95 05 




1959 58 


6392 63 


106 35 


2245 06 


1933 50 
3350 00 


"'66'i.5 




3 9 23 
1272 71 


2242 73 
4682 86 


2 33 


4843 92 




161 06 


6195 73 


2755 00 


56 00 


146 37 


3086 54 


6043 91 


151 82 


13111 51 


7294 23 


37 00 


178 69 


5248 14 


12758 06 


353 45 


3961 27 


2786 66 






1158 .50 


3945 16 


16 11 


5055 87 


3132 00 


72 63 


253 60 


906 55 


4364 78 


691 09 


7404 25 


5845 77 






1446 64 


7292 41 


111 84 


5019 98 


3233 89 


95 00 


859 93 


794 92 


4983 74 


36 24 


2240 18 


1483 00 


65 11 


13 50 


382 89 


1944 .50 


295 68 


16053 30 


4558 06 


60 75 


9879 28 


1552 80 


16050 89 


2 41 


5235 58 


2658 30 


302 24 




558 61 


3519 15 


1716 43 


2508 12 


1700 00 


40 00 




768 12 


251)8 12 





79t;0 17 


3850 00 
1 4340 25 


113 00 




3633 58 
803 12 


7596 58 
5151 37 


363 59 


6600 06 


8 <'0 


1448 69 


16438 70 


6953 79 


95 60 


6000 00 


2208 20 


1.52-.7 59 


1181 11 


5266 84 


4058 33 
2938 00 


20 00 
71 95 




1118 33 
979 69 


'■.5196 66 
3989 64 


70 18 


54S2 46 




1492 82 


2548 91 


19ti3 55 


50 00 


128 00 


407 36 


2,548 91 




5814 4'. 


1 2331 66 
2375 00 
1981 .50 


"167 '56 




3466 91 
649 49 

755 (;5 


5798 57 
3131 99 
2955 21 


15 86 


3256 34 




124 35 


3877 39 


218 06 


922 18 


496-2 70 


3692 75 


i76 06 




10 -.0 69 


4919 44 


43 26 


10918 26 


7267 66 


238 35 


400 00 


2961 SI 


10867 82 


50 44 


6924 66 


J! 4591 32 






1578 33 


6169 65 


755 01 










353130 15 


200028 47 


3880 18 


36815 10 


77231 70 


317955 45 


35174 70 



29 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE A.— The PubUc 









RECEIPTS. 






TOTAL. 


For Teachers' Sal- 
aries. (Legislative 
Grant. ) 


For Maps, Appar- 
atus, Prizes and 
Libraries. (Legis- 
lative Grant.) 


Municipal School 
Assessment. 


Trustees' School 

■ Assessment. 


Clergy Reserve Fund, 
Balances and otlier 
sources. 


Counties, &c 


$ c. 
208475 83 

23827 50 

26235 50 


$ c. 
13799 72 

736 19 

1220 74 


$ 0. 

361280 44 

271347 58 
239726 59 


$ c. 
1405686 80 


$ c. 
543458 48 


Cities 


65579 12 


Towns 




8.5947 32 




1405686 80 
1564126 22 




Grand Total, 1878 

do do 1877 


258538 83* 
251962 55 


15756 65 
18104 47 


872354 61 
858305 13 


694984 92 
730687 39 


Increase 


6576 28 


2347 82 


14049 48 


158439 42 




Decrease 


35702 47 









* Including $7200 for training of teachers at Model Schools. 

Note. — AH. moneys reported in this or any of the following tables, represent actual payments made 
between the 1st January and 31st December. 



:{0 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No, 5.) 



A. 1880 



Schools of Ontario — Concluded. 









EXPENDITURE. 






Total Receipts for 
all Public School 
purposes. 


For Teachers' Sal- 
aries. 


For Maps, Appar- 
atus, Prizes and 
Libraries, includ- 
ing 100 per cent. 


|| 

j» ho 

O "^ 


For .Rent and Re- 
pairs, Collectors' 
Fees, Fuel and 
other expenses. 


Total Expenditure 
for all Public School 
purposes. 


Balance. 


% c. 
2532701 27 

361490 39 

353130 15 


$ c. 
1635188 40 

175991 10 

200028 47 


$ c. 
32982 47 

5644 75 

3880 18 


$ c. 
315015 40 

61562 35 

36815 10 


$ c. 
269056 29 

75951 12 

77231 70 


$ c. 
2252242 56 

319149 32 

317955 45 


$ c. 
280458 71 

42311 07 

35174 70 


3247321 81 
3423185 76 


2011207 97 
2038099 50 


42507 40 
47539 47 


413392 85 
477392 90 


422239 11 
510457 74 


2889347 33 
3073489 61 


357974 48 
349696 15 




26891 53 


5032 07 






184142 28 


8278 33 


1758G3 95 


64000 05 


88218 63 







Tables A, B, C, D, E, include the statistics of Roman Catholic Separate Schools. These statistics are 
however, given separately in Table F. 



31 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE B.— The PubUc 



COUNTIES. 

(Including Incorporated Vil- 
lages, but not Cities 
or Towns.) 



Glengarry 

Stormont . .. . . 

Dundas 

Prescott 

Russell , . . . 

Carleton 

Grenville 

Leeds 

Lanark 

Renfrew . . 

Frontenac 

Lennox and A ddington 

Prince Edward 

Hastings 

Northumberland 

Durham 

Peterborough 

Haliburton 

Victoria 

Ontario 

York 

Peel 

Simcoe ... 

Halton 

"Wentworth 

Brant 

Lincoln 

WeUand 

Haldimand 

Norfolk 

Oxford 

Waterloo , . 

Wellington 

Grey 

Perth 

Huron 

Bruce 

Middlesex 

Elgin 

Kent 

Lambton 

Essex , 

Districts ... 

Total 



CITIES. 

BeUerille , 

Brantf ord 

Hamilton 

Kingston 

London 

Ottawa 

St. Catharines 

Toronto 

Total . . . 



^ <o 



O 'O 
o 

m 



5190 

4921 

5371 

4910 

4874 

9122 

5451 

8150 

8788 

7010 

7315 

6100 

4436 

11038 

9134 

7660 

5898 

1428 

9400 

13060 

17039 

6400 

19884 

5186 

6740 

5135 

5275 

6183 

6670 

8600 

101.53 

8843 

17493 

18'-68 

10919 

20191 

17493 

176.57 

8800 

10928 

11299 

9082 

28.37 



PUPILS ATTENDING 



390731 



2610 
3180 
7600 
4.520 
4354 
6500 
2815 
17500 

49079 



J5 is 
'S,"" 



3 
29 
17 
23 
59 
41 

8 
21 
23 
42 
24 
17 

9 
39 
10 
20 
27 
13 
31 
29 
58 
11 
65 
15 
17 
11 

"15 
30 
24 
9 
13 
60 
60 
27 
78 
61 
23 
53 

119 
20 
28 
]5 






= ^ 






4862 


240 


4408 


211 


5210 


266 


3719 


91 


3780 


282 


8491 


421 


5214 


251 


8143 


377 


8122 


230 


6969 


232 


7222 


239 


5997 


333 


4422 


363 


10416 


511 


8856 


502 


7435 


461 


5568 


205 


]307 


33 


9329 


439 


121,33 


702 


16690 


812 


6347 


390 


17865 


747 


5181 


263 


6572 


387 


4853 


285 


5264 


304 


5971 


3L4 


6538 


410 


85t;6 


616 


9863 


658 


8494 


237 


167-^5 


877 


18496 


903 


10759 


370 


19921 


809 


17040 


757 


17696 


875 


8755 


621 


10883 


496 


11101 


413 


8132 


229 


2531 


84 



1297 375876 



18246 



12 

2 

19 

39 



2542 
22.S7 
7277 
3698 
4774 
5860 
2480 
14476 

43394 



15 
36 
44 
28 
82 
21 
69 

303 



801 



4 

7 

9 

2 

8 
22 
10 
27 
18 

9 

5 
10 
17 
11 
15 
21 

4 

1 
21 
27 
32 

16 ! 
34 
14 
28 

4 

9 

9 
18 
24 
18 

6 
76 
40 
10 
49 
31 
51 
18 
25 
21 
17 

3 



Q 3 » 



3 
18 



5109 

4655 

5.502 

3S35 

4129 

8975 

5483 

8568 

8393 

7252 

7490 

6357 

4811 

10977 

9383 

7937 

5804 

1354 

9820 

12891 

17592 

6764 

18711 

5473 

7004 

51.53 

5577 

6:'!C9 

6996 

9230 

10.548 

87.50 

17768 

19499 

111(16 

20857 

17889 

18645 

9447 

11523 

115.55 

8406 

2633 



« 



396220 



2.558 
2302 
7317 
3742 
4811 
5M54 
2.-03 
14567 

43754 



2694 
2471 
2932 
2004 
2141 
4835 
29 
4535 
4348 
3840 
3856 
3332 
2632 
5847 
5066 
4414 
3176 
749 
.5216 
7063 
9561 
3638 

10O46 
2993 
3921 
2841 
2872 
3359 
3730 
4979 
5792 
4872 
9687 

10:s67 
5999 

11209 
9676 
9983 
5101 
6097 
6069 
4487 
1423 

212753 



1282 
1181 
3797 
1895 
2464 
3286 
1309 
7452 

22666 



32 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



Schools of Ontario. 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 







Number of Pupils attending School. 




•en be- 
years 
;nding 
f four 
year. 


o 
o 






m 


n 
>> 






o 
-a 




a 


-f 


m ^ 


i o 
o 


o 

o 


O 

o 


n3 
O 

i-H 




t, « <D S^ 




3 


1-^ 


o 

iM 




o 


I-H 


§ 


^ 


< 


2415 


456 


965 


1346 


1186 


940 


216 


600 


2245 


2184 


435 


934 


1224 


1087 


821 


154 


364 


2031 


2o70 


464 


886 


1388 


1288 


1204 


272 


795 


2572 


1831 


362 


803 


1028 


801 


688 


153 


850 


1966 


1988 


478 


907 


1061 


801 


695 


187 


662 


i 1652 


4140 


707 


1548 


2344 


2040 


1718 


618 


470 


4080 


2583 


489 


954 


1355 


1268 


1059 


358 


223 


2.531 


4033 


747 


1547 


2213 


1938 


1771 


.352 


157 


3740 


4045 


786 


1427 


1965 


1830 


1731 


654 


296 


5055 


3412 


733 


1443 


1699 


1814 


1185 


378 


565 


2522 


3634 


892 


1070 


2107 


1519 


1104 


198 


986 


2779 


3025 


753 


1397 


1652 


1251 


1126 


178 


256 


2579 


2179 


363 


815 


1132 


1138 


1107 


256 


183 


2272 


5130 


1167 


2267 


2925 


2443 


1871 


304 


1236 


5028 


4317 


752 


18H7 


2430 


1925 


1876 


563 


379 


4188 


3523 


767 


1623 


2005 


1758 


1511 


273 


3.52 


2763 


2628 


558 


1274 


1455 


1201 


1115 


201 


673 


2402 


605 


224 


339 


410 


199 


139 


43 


175 


442 


4604 


1056 


2091 


2533 


2126 


1650 


364 


485 


4027 


5828 


1219 


2496 


3433 


2673 


2562 


508 


380 


6:^46 


8031 


1660 


3300 


4167 


3664 


3915 


886 


722 


76(i9 


3126 


648 


1417 


1772 


1480 


1317 


130 


219 


2703 


8665 


2103 


3833 


4863 


4065 


3199 


648 


1144 


3731 


2480 


508 


1005 


1355 


1158 


1297 


1.50 


471 


2426 


3083 


637 


1249 


1882 


1608 


1348 


280 


217 


3139 


2312 


432 


923 


1281 


1137 


1116 


264 


124 


4510 


270i 


479 


IVSi 


1458 


1197 


1192 


218 


731 


2449 


2950 


569 


1193 


1588 


1371 


1289 


299 


185 


2641 


3266 


636 


12.38 


1798 


1636 


1336 


3.52 


192 


3186 


4251 


838 


1810 


2572 


2033 


1636 


341 


363 


3839 


4756 


727 


1722 


2612 


2289 


2445 


753 


301 


5189 


3878 


498 


1293 


1991 


1838 


2601 


529 


328 


4436 


808] 


1607 


3423 


4280 


3951 


3612 


895 


1418 


7752 


9132 


2232 


4.535 


5173 


4014 


2945 


600 


1892 


7128 


5167 


742 


1907 


27 .'2 


2525 


2707 


513 


392 


5234 


9648 


1525 


3468 


5075 


4630 


4940 


1219 


747 


9818 


8-213 


942 


3903 


4432 


3793 


3801 


1018 


19.59 


8017 


8662 


1.540 


3431 


4436 


4177 


4183 


878 


423 


9169 


4346 


837 


1670 


2233 


2023 


2143 


541 


107 


4529 


5426 


1108 


2247 


3005 


2559 


2215 


389 


1239 


4694 


5486 


1042 


20S4 


2876 


2511 


2434 


608 


860 


5146 


3919 


933 


1651 


2325 


2002 


1219 


276 


659 


3278 


1210 


476 


659 


660 


438 


342 


58 


233 


875 


183467 


36127 


76217 


100311 


86385 


79105 


18075 


25013 


172778 


1276 


245 


298 


583 


594 


715 


123 


35 


1277 


1121 


109 


255 


470 


524 


738 


206 




1320 


3520 


317 


752 


1645 


1390 


2490 


723 


150 


4587 


1847 


233 


404 


1085 


898 1 


919 


203 





1966 


2347 


444 , 


685 


1041 


1034 


1442 


165 


703 


2508 


2668 


420 


717 


1409 


1076 


1498 


834 




3143 


1194 


163 ! 


317 


551 


530 


845 


96 


45 


1353 


7115 


793 1 


1479 


3144 


2629 


5748 


774 


1.50 


8766 


21088 


2724 j 


4907 j 


9928 


8675 1 


14396 

1 


3124 


1083 j 


24920 



33 



i 



48 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 









TABLE B.— The Public 










PUPILS ATTENDING 




II 




•w 
% 




U 


X to 1 

— c 






§° 


>. 


iO 




>i 






TOWNS. 


"73 <» 


no 

c 




g^ 

^ ° 


S-i 

c 6 


umber ol 
ages at 






-a 


fco 


O 




-, to 


cs ° 






'c c 


.2 * 


.2 !>i 




J2 =s 


- * 2 






O w 


§-■3 




&- 


'l-s 


-g o « 


>> 




zn 


^ 


PL| 


Ph 


&H 1 


H 


P3 


Amherstburgh 


708 




645 


22 




667 


377 


Barrie 


1280 


8 


1037 


66 




nil 


527 


Berlin 


1163 




883 


1 




884 


454 


Bothwell , 


272 




274 


5 


1 


280 


141 


BowmanvUle 


872 
889 




760 
707 


7 




760 
715 


393 




372 


Brockville 


1530 


... j 1496 


9 




1505 


758 


Chatham 


2000 


1959 


41 


2 


2002 


1027 


Clifton 


500 


493 


12 




505 


260 


Clinton 


663 


1 ! 648 


1 




650 


331 




1400 
1005 


... i 1191 
.... 1 1011 


5 
23 


4 
3 


1200 
1037 


601 


Collingwood 


543 


Cornwall . . . 


900 


.... i 868 


8 


2 


878 


396 


Dundas 


9.i0 


8 ; 934 


3 


2 


947 


524 


Durham 


251 


.... 1 230 


12 




242 


1.33 


Gait 


1196 


.... 1 1053 




1 


1054 


559 




1261 
2431 


1107 
2012 


15 
11 


3 


1125 
2023 


588 


Guelph 


1020 


IngersoU 


1100 


1055 


8 




1063 


558 




879 
1700 


869 
1572 


13 
39 




882 
1611 


442 


Lindsay 


806 


Listowel 


640 


630 







630 


321 


Meaf ord 


500 


464 


22 




486 


222 


Milton 


360 


363 


18 




381 


211 


Mitchell 


651 
833 


.... • 656 


2 
50 




2 


658 
863 


334 






811 


444 


Niagara = 


322 




286 


1 




287 ' 


148 


Oakville 


530 




458 


7 




465 


229 


Orangeville 


750 


.... 


700 


9 




709 


3.50 


Orillia 


1000 




897 


.... . 




897 


464 


Owen Sound 


1200 




1021 


1 




1022 


514 




426 
900 




303 
804 


34 




308 
818 


156 


Paris 


441 


Perth -. 


720 




650 


14 




664 


335 


Peterboro' 


2000 




193.{ 


41 




1974 


996 


Petrolia 


853 




841 


10 




851 


461 


Picton 


800 


3 


668 


32 





703 


351 


Port Hope 


1400 


.... ; 1243 


9 




1252 


636 


Prescott 


800 ; ... 


714 


5 


8 


727 


353 


Sandwich 


257 1 ... 


257 


11 




268 


135 


Sarnia 


1237 


1100 


12 


2 


1114 


560 


Seaf orth 


685 


651 


11 




665 


327 


Simcoe 


520 


513 


7 




520 


285 




1100 


1048 


3 




1051 


494 


St Thomas 


1460 


1376 
1777 


145 

7 




1521 
1784 


747 


Stratford 


1900 




i 940 


Strathroy 


1000 




955 


10 


2 


967 


490 


Thorold 


750 




731 


2 




733 


349 




520 




503 
673 


8 


""l 


511 
674 


246 


Walkerton 


690 1 .... 


353 


Waterloo 


.540 


1 .... 


490 


4 


1 


495 


248 


Welland 


570 


.... 


: 514 


3 




517 


287 


Whitbv 


9.50 


1 


865 


22 


2 


890 


496 


Windsor 


1547 


... 1 13.S8 


9 




1347 


1 624 


Woodstock 


1189 


1123 


5 




1128 


1 624 

i 


Total 


52550 


j 22 48163 

i 1 


820 


36 

i 


i 49041 

1 


1 24981 

1 



34 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Paj^ers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



Schools of Ontario — Continued. 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 






XUIIBEB OF PdPILS ATTENDING ScHOOL. 



rS <U 



13 
45 
64 
17 
60 
33 
73 

161 
27 
12 
95 

126 

121 
66 
6 
41 
60 
92 
77 
62 

101 
30 
45 
27 
15 
77 
11 
38 

101 
99 
40 
36 
38 
30 

145 
47 
49 
51 
23 
17 
96 
45 
37 
54 
73 

126 
78 
49 
41 
61 
19 
68 
75 

101 
61 

3245 



50 
110 

94 

45 
109 

76 
200 
375 

47 

44 
125 
186 
127 
148 

31 
100 
118 
232 
146 
133 
179 
112 

74 

52 
118 
129 

36 

51 
143 
150 
187 

74 

85 

72 
289 i 
120 

97 
151 

47 

54 
135 

81 

63 
157 
213 
208 
110 

75 

58 

99 

35 
107 
130 
175 
148 

6510 



123 
151 
165 

60 
156 
142 
301 
570 
103 

96 
381 
272 
253 
219 

54 
189 
216 
450 
2^7 
206 
358 
140 
144 

82 
142 
214 

73 
132 
249 
292 
238 

82 
173 

80 
458 
163 
119 
253 
147 

73 
231 

97 

90 
305 
314 
315 
152 
178 

98 
154 

70 
129 I 
204 
248 
262 

10803 



145 
458 
161 

59 
147 
170 
288 
476 
137 
280 
333 
223 
186 
229 

60 
210 
265 
484 
231 
223 
347 
151 
119 

61 
134 
208 

58 
145 
134 
215 
260 

68 
174 
129 
494 
187 
163 
288 
137 

40 
265 
120 
129 
283 
525 
296 
196 
148 
102 
134 
103 
125 
173 
360 
254 

11490 



246 
315 
387 

79 
282 
294 
53fi 
390 
174 
218 
242 
214 
190 
249 

45 
399 
426 
679 
337 
220 
504 
145 

98 
124 
233 
224 

88 

99 

58 
116 
282 

45 
301 
230 
532 
303 
213 
509 
259 

43 
318 
199 
178 
233 
396 
622 
391 
208 
150 
215 
203 

88 
293 
304 
351 

14476 



90 
32 
23 
20 
6 



108 
30 
17 



24 
16 
1 
36 
46 

115 
40 
86 
35 
38 

122 
52 
6 
35 
16 
11 
21 



24 
25 
15 
3 
67 
123 
56 
31 
62 



114 
41 
69 

123 
23 
19 



217 
40 
75 
62 
11 
65 



15 
159 

52 

2517 






9^ ^^s. 

,^ ra ^ c o 

U r- "^ 00-^ 



21 
40 



40 
13 



98 
10 



9 

'io 



10 
'lO 
31 



42 

150 

39 



100 



300 



27 

54 

103 

12 



13 
60 



23 



53 



30 
13 



1319 






422 
592 
511 
143 
446 
365 
866 
995 
288 
377 
651 
472 
388 
481 
98 
647 
624 

1155 
587 
449 
897 
384 
230 
197 
447 
416 
159 
220 
316 
378 
6il 
139 
457 
458 
976 
484 
434 
745 
468 
144 
6i.'8 
388 
273 
544 
751 

1080 
532 
421 
282 
352 
319 
202 
485 
909 
607 

26890 



35 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE B.— The Public 





c 

& . 


PUPILS ATTENDING 












^ ttj 






^'i 


^ 


^3 

a 


-73 


O 








i"^ 




c3 




i 


■— ' s 




















TOTAL. 


^ U 




g^ 




>> 

i-H 


^^ 












01 <w 




<u m 






£>^ 




& o 


^ o 


U 


^ dj 


























Q) i^ 














P 0) 

fee 






o 


CS o 






"3 fl 


^ ^ 


^ >> 


^ >. 


^ • 


^ =s o 






o ri 


D.'« 


■£.0 


'Shit! 


'a^ 


j-^-S 


>> 




'o''^ 




prH 


3vM 




-g O m 


o 




m 


C^ 


0-1 


Ph 


p-l 


H 


pq 


Counties, &c 


390731 


1297 


375876 


18246 


801 


396220 


212753 


Cities 


49(179 


•69 


43394 


303 


18 


43754 


22(jr6 


Towns 


52550 


22 


48163 


820 


36 


49041 


24981 


Grand Total, 1878 


492360 


1358 


4674.33 


19369 


855 


489015 


260400 


Do 1877 


494804 


1430 


4G9241 


19312 


877 


490860 


261070 


Increase 




.... 




57 








Decrease 


2444 


72 


isos 




22 


i845 


670 



.SO 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



Schools of Ontario — -Concluded. 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 





Number of Pupils attending School. 


Number of children be- 
tween 7 and 12 years 
of age not attending 
any school for four 
months of the year. 


1 

a 

1 
P 

> ft 

< 


Girls. 


Lessthan20days 
during the year. 


o 
m 

o 
-u 

o 


1 

o 
o 

o 

I-l 


1 

o 

I-l 
o 

s 


o 

o 


O "^ 

TO O 
rH ^ 

o 

(M 


18:^467 
21088 
21060 


36127 
2724 
3245 


76217 
4907 
6510 


100311 

9928 

10803 


86385 

8675 

11490 


79105 
14396 
14476 


18075 
3124 
2517 


25013 
1083 
1319 


172778 
24920 
26890 


228615 
229790 


42096 
43675 


87634 
88581 


121042 
127331 


106550 
109697 


107977 
100676 


23716 
20900 


27415 
25974 


224588 
217184 


' 'ii75 


"isrg 


947 


' '6289 


"'3147 


7301 


2816 


1441 


7404 



37 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



TABLE C— The Public 



NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 





READING. 


Dicta- 








COUNTIES. 


tiO 


to 


so 


u> 


!aO 


•S ■ 






a 




a 


a 


.s 




13 








(Including Incorporated 


'"Im 


'i^ 


5,y 


-^A 


■13 . 


■|6 


i 




'-5 




Villages, but not Cities 
or Towns.) 






(U o 






1 = 

7^ 




S 


2 

bo 




^ 


'^ 


r^; 


X 


-fi 


cM 


K^ 


i 


•E 






1-1 


Z-i 


Z^ 


■5r 


o 


'^ 


m 


< 


a 


Glengarry 


1461 


1089 


1354 


1076 


129 




5109 


3993 


3982 


2957 


Stormont 


1374 


911 


1123 


896 


3.51 




4003 


3208 


3343 


2159 


Dundas 


1424 


1022 


1233 


1230 


593 




3563 


3725 


3810 


2348 


Prescott 


1251 


1016 


970 


581 


17 




2f;05 


2571 


2927 


1359 


Pussell 


1524 
2371 


1114 
2040 


1004 
2248 


381 
1450 


106 
823 


""43 


2320 
5496 


2414 
6957 


2675 
6506 


1574 


Carleton 


4036 


Grenville 


1462 


1200 


1484 


1060 


261 


16 


4425 


43>1 


4504 


2850 




2302 
23U6 


1892 
1875 


2553 
2.564 


1692 
1424 


129 
224 




6723 
6164 


60O7 
6579 


6802 
6826 


5458 


Lanark 


5464 


Renfrew 


2346 


1754 


1918 


993 


241 




3997 


4806 


4847 


3116 


Frontenac 


2532 


1871 


2252 


796 


39 




6164 


5998 


5889 


4807 


Lennox and Addington . . 


1780 


1408 


2032 


1070 


67 




5437 


6011 


5782 


5041 




1172 
4513 


934 
2670 


1334 
2745 


1118 
912 


253 
137 




3824 
91fil 


3921 
9743 


4057 
9976 


3707 


Hastings 


6641 


Northumberland 


2697 


2468 


2566 


1453 


199 




938.< 


9383 


9383 


6881 


Durham 


2298 


1762 


2247 


1303 


276 


51 


6063 


6452 


6540 


4585 


Peterborough 


1968 


1492 


1634 


654 


52 


4 


4569 


4725 


4760 


4185 


Haliburton , 


460 


354 


327 


175 


37 


1 


1077 


1010 


1054 


815 




2995 
3692 


2366 
2744 


2915 
3738 


1307 
2284 


223 
415 


14 

18 


6934 
9239 


7835 
10240 


7930 
102.58 


6301 


Ontario 


7111 


York 


5297 
2322 


3759 
1845 


4795 
1789 


2959 
742 


768 
66 


14 


1.3430 
5995 


14484 

5cS99 


14164 
5929 


10512 


Peel 


4273 




6313 

2068 


47.55 
1304 


4857 
1550 


2539 
525 


247 

26 





12924 
4937 


13803 
.5311 


13952 
5260 


10130 


Halton 


3430 




1852 
1438 


1452 
1106 


2078 
1309 


1194 
941 


428 
351 


■■"s 


5810 
4618 


5S16 
4517 


5946 
4495 


4113 


Brant 


4324 




151.S 
1671 
1841 


1158 
1230 
1458 


1633 
1560 
1978 


994 
1158 
1346 


274 
6.55 
366 


'""35 

7 


4512 
5002 
5948 


4262 
5403 
5918 


4403 
5515 
5601 


3136 


Welland 


3976 


Haldimand 


4565 


Norfolk 


2395 


1847 


2390 


1782 


773 


43 


6529 


6832 


7081 


4.537 


Oxford 


3134 


2344 


3i;i4 


1590 


338 


8 


8343 


8391 


6885 


6790 


Waterloo 


2915 


2064 


2621 


790 


252 


108 


7117 


7682 


78j0 


5901 




5140 
5847 


38.5" 
4765 


47.^5 
5593 


3147 

2898 


864 
388 


12 

8 


136.57 
13393 


13928 
15649 


14511 
15567 


10151 


Grey 


10767 


Perth 


3401 


2444 


3300 


1574 


401 


46 


9022 


9355 


9169 


6298 


Huron 


6G99 


4805 


5973 


2562 


773 


45 


17230 


18227 


1^793 


14042 


Bruce 


6040 


4478 


5005 


2065 


.301 


... . 


1.^811 


15(t24 


15i26 


10478 


Middlesex . . ." 


5157 


4534 


49(^0 


3383 


603 


8 


14540 


15188 


15685 


6808 


Elgin 


1979 


1916 


2460 


2154 


938 


• • • * 


7612 


7322 


7835 


6105 


Kent 


3788 


2719 


2908 


1670 


438 




9019 


9188 


93()9 


7012 


Lambton 


35^3 


28(10 


3045 


1829 


3.-.8 




9025 


8870 


10102 


7013 


Essex 


3343 


1874 


1769 


1194 


223 


3 


66.i0 


70.18 


7244 


5132 


Districts 


1120 


779 


607 


125 


2 


492 


2326 
309916 


2357 
321083 


2323 
327099 


1479 


Total 


120729 


91268 


108310 


61016 


14405 


314367 


CITIES. 
















Belleville 


945 


589 


667 


330 


27 




2213 


2482 


2339 


2065 


Brantf ord 


634 


5:-!4 


719 


287 


128 




2302 


2064 


2064 


2064 




2284 
1135 


1376 
642 


1982 
927 


1366 
633 


309 
310 




95 


7160 
2444 


7125 
2>:00 


7016 
2921 


6907 


Kingston 


2461 




1531 
21i9 


819 
985 


1498 
16ti5 


725 
658 


150 
517 


88 


435.-V 
5222 


3722 
5308 


4051 
4856 


34(8 


Ottawa 


3288 


St. Catharines 


661 
5361 


457 
3631 


681 
3039 


494 
1535 


210 
519 


"482 


1978 
12973 


2385 
11923 


2385 
13760 

39392 


1678 


Toronto 


12529 


Total 


14680 


9033 


11178 


6028 


2170 


665 


38650 


37809 


34400 



38 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



Schools of Ontario. 



DTFFEEEXT BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION. 



u 


_c3 

3 

O 

o 

> 


1 ^ 
§ 

Ol 

^^ 
o 

o 


to ' Grammar and Com- 
*.' positiwn. 


Canadian History. 


English History. 


General History. 


Hygiene. 


Algebra. 


Geometry and Men- 
suration. 


Chemistry and Ag- 
riculture. 


Natural Philosophy. 


Domestic Economy 
to (Girls only.) 


60 
g 

■ft 
H) 

m 

Ji 




pq 
126 


Drill & Calisthenics. 


842 


967 


1360 


734 


605 


85 


1 338 


86 


73 


21 


2 


213 


269 


518 


417 


1 1856 


282 


372 


117 


3 


110 


88 


3 






71 




343 


653 


579 


! 2280 


417 


708 


90 


! 119 


107 


84 


3 


. • . . 


• • . . 


91 


i23 


120 


40 


391 


1 12.50 


398 


277 


96 


82 


11 


54 








21 




210 


372 


735 


. 1199 


233 


262 


85 


85 


65 


84 


1 


5 


162 


17 


627 


1281 


1798 


1344 


3420 


757 


1011 


183 


155 


2.37 


267 


27 


2 


57 


119 


595 


309 


803 


625 


2333 


456 


609 


103 


88 


125 


113 


26 


12 


39 


133 


60 


759 


595 


6H8 


4125 


1510 


1336 


141 


209 


175 


131 


4 


28 




151 




997 


1!>05 


2023 


4100 


398 


998 


74 


16 


123 


106 




18 




71 




218 


970 


355 


2601 


404 


496 


44 


58 


44 


42 


2 


7 


30 


63 


60 


1275 


132;-! 


1210 


3116 


491 


613 


107 


1.55 


106 


78 


14 





21 


115 


197 


2463 


1575 


1775 


2819 


675 


710 


92 


51 


103 


95 


37 


9 


12 


180 


505 


2497 


959 


1911 


2816 


804 


946 


41 


556 


227 


149 


. 11 


15 




222 


231 


2149 


3814 


4852 


3882 


697 


8o;-i 


163 


2S2 


232 


105 


101 


27 


5 


161 


1266 


1723 


1252 


1750 


5011 


713 


1411 


18 


89 


322 


272 


2 


12 




242 


295 


602 


907 


941 


3681 


225 


1164 


75 


125 


284 


198 


16 


31 


8 


194 


44 


1047 


677 


682 


2/87 


258 


401 


4 


103 


59 


40 




8 




32 


152 


187 


212 


267 


532 


56 


129 


80 


17 


42 


13 


7 


6 


19 


3 


159 


4122 


4971 


2357 


4103 


677 


1021 


275 


684 


288 


263 


24 


101 




76 


1778 


3197 


4127 


3936 


5462 


784 


1769 


131 


370 


393 


278 


1 


14 


18 


210 


684 


7897 


8154 


6376 


7924 


1952 


2640 


370 


618 


404 


552 


93 


45 


476 


461 


899 


4359 


1855 


2315 


2763 


642 


746 


109 


149 


109 


141 


1 


9 




103 


164 


2490 


4230 


3637 


7518 


1810 


2040 


465 


740 


323 


367 


76 


24 




185 


1032 


39H] 


1978 


2991 


2450 


531 


576 


10 


269 


lOii 


106 


62 


13 




60 


121 


1297 


1645 


1369 


3438 


459 


980 


319 


438 


261 


239 


28 


8 




189 


388 


3665 


2401 


2121 


2602 


1105 


11013 


172 


998 


275 


214 


56 


25 




221 


842 


345 


467 


699 


2385 


311 


728 


116 


141 


158 


118 


13 


10 




181 


97 


970 


1748 


1911 


5140 


673 


846 


118 


349 


183 


248 


2 


27 




320 


493 


1479 


1112 


2921 


3802 


786 


1143 


100 


112 


171 


117 


4 


1 




116 


222 


1390 


1473 


729 


2931 


580 


1133 


213 


202 


192 


247 




42 


20 


409 




2994 


2492 


2335 


5184 


1148 


2041 


246 


319 


401 


394 


38 


45 


2 


315 


617 


5258 


5283 


4447 


4306 


1303 


918 


97 


600 


283 


326 




32 


153 


182 


793 


3631 


5610 


3992 


8179 


1746 


2829 


275 


857 


529 


725 


23 


145 


13 


445 


660 


5275 


5331 


4128 


^223 


1728 


2183 


321 


659 


326 


370 


49 


19 


49 


242 


452 


2266 


3124 


2625 


5415 


966 


1369 


165 


507 


362 


363 


17 


41 




179 


226 


11742 


8522 


12932 


9729 


5656 


3131 


244 


3616 


820 


800 


151 


83 




4.58 


1316 


4886 


5865 


5578 


7848 


2616 


1908 


171 


697 


344 


310 




114 


i5i 


204 


1172 


8890 


5806 


7032 


8522 


1722 


2 117 


588 


935 


431 


421 


23 


40 




305 


2373 


2232 


11(»8 


3855 


4728 


557 


1676 


120 


636 


348 


273 


20 


34 


42 


390 


548 


5672 


2887 


41)39 


4971 


8001 


1493 


180 


7091 


358 


300 


204 


87 


7I 


284 


778 


16(11 


2489 


2915 


5.i6li 


1693 


1449 


136 


221 


306 


249 


15 


9 


27 


217 


710 


2179 


2307 


4674 


3241 


1152 


977 


115 


168 


166 


191 


19 


5 


24 


99 


881 


830 


658 

104983 

1 


960 
113429 


855 


160 


72 


9 


3 


14 


18 








31 


132 


109920 


175426 


41065 


49949 


6663 


17528 


10009 


9522 


1194 


1160 


1358 


7894 


21895 


1820 


2426 

2.302 i 


2f'88 
1655 


1086 
IISO 


927 

529 


370 

529 


89 

258 


"723 


32 

198 


15 
134 




1 




36 
126 


1954 


2259 


64 




70! 


1538 


6840 


6507 


6657 


3129 


692 


1425 


309 


4933 


110 


110 




iio 


350 


170 


160 


2496 


1976 


1788 


1838 


662 


789 


229 


717 


297 


312 




89 


20 


275 


1185 


828 


36U9 
4309 


1110 
3967 


2.322 

2783 


105 
608 


280 
597 


" '282 


315 

2501 


145 
265 


475 

388 


"'250 


1 




50 
383 


390 


30.^6 




1651 


1647 


19(19 


201:, 


1397 


1320 


1086 


512| 


306 


418 


33 


131 




is 


100 


181 




11498 


1307-- 


9084 


8469 


2633 


1648 


1511 


3910 


1409 


1262 


111 


1206 


1596 


1420 


« 2043 


29706 


36221 


27746 


22127 


7242 


6150 


2984 


11266 


2489 


2827 


425 


1423 


3787 


2641 


8917 



39 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE C — The Public 



NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 





READING. 


Spelling and Dicta- 
tion. 




■•s 

G 

Xi 

< 


C3 




TOWNS. 


be, 
a 

•i; O 


c5 


<u o 

CO 






.2 




p 




200 
365 
334 

94 
264 
2'j7 
401 
651 
155 
284 
. 383 
353 
•343 
261 

56 
338 
302 
632 
356 
370 
610 
191 
153 
148 
198 
243 
102 
165 
217 
400 
327 

89 
226 
162 
724 
383 
200 
447 
196 

89 
353 
258 
157 
239 
365 
531 
351 
213 
212 
186 
198 
136 
289 
454 
414 


117 
315 
173 

74 
145 
158 
337 
538 
124 
125 
323 
209 
189 
275 

44 
142 
339 
400 
192 
195 
316 
184 
. 53 

79 
155 
178 

46 
148 
139 
217 
166 

73 
154 
170 
427 
205 
158 
156 
175 

55 
328 
140 
130 
301 
476 
350 
256 
139 

92 
134 
114 
138 
169 
343 
281 


179 
281 
200 

83 
230 
192 
387 
504 
109 

95 
316 
332 
138 
188 

58 
304 
339 
566 
289 
186 
380 
175 
114 
124 
186 
254 

88 
113 
293 
134 
347 
101 
258 
211 
415 
130 
145 
364 
186 

66 
225 
144 
133 
346 
397 
617 
188 
174 
146 
175 

79 
173 
189 
309 
301 


115 
136 
101 

12 
121 

68 
208 
218 
101 

9.- 
137 
143 
136 
183 

44 
189 
137 
375 
226 
131 
230 

80 

71 

18 

119 

188 

^ 51 

39 

50 
146 
182 

33 
188 
121 
373 

71 
118 
186 
131 

44 
200 

97 
100 
165 
262 
286 
172 
149 

41 
179 

62 

70 
227 
228 
132 


56 




569 

993 

577 

280 

649 

4.TJ6 

1025 

1730 

505 

366 

1193 

1037 

835 

796 

162 

996 

1117 

1780 

695 

834 

1219 

439 

397 

381 

460 

863 

244 

300 

680 

623 

828 

219 

807 

638 

1897 

689 

517 

1252 

599 

268 

959 

615 

363 

1031 

1205 

1581 

804 

679 

511 

674 

418 

451 

626 

979 

1128 


547 

909 

724 

280 

526 

492 

1104 

1915 

450 

454 

1076 

887 

835 

879 

152 

1041 

1117 

1789 

916 

749 

1159 

439 

340 

381 

460 

863 

244 

• 438 

700 

280 

695 

219 

838 

518 

1899 

689 

503 

1252 

514 

268 

852 

635 

363 

1051 

1217 

1784 

438 

699 

511 

674 

413 

433 

860 

12.59 

1128 


667 

869 

724 

280 

649 

607 

1210 

1915 

441 

650 

1163 

1023 

835 

709 

15-; 

1026 

1120 

1779 

916 

882 

1470 

439 

413 

381 

460 

863 

214 

419 

709 

897 

828 

219 

838 

520 

1914 

851 

665 

1252 

719 

268 

1076 

665 

520 

1031 

1277 

1539 

967 

547 

511 

674 

495 

451 

652 

1236 

1128 


443 
664 
528 
186 
595 
418 

1025 

1327 
286 
370 
756 
469 
800 
757 
228 
704 
823 

1516 
675 
512 
930 
439 
356 
233 
405 
467 
185 
295 
419 
384 
651 
196 
838 
493 

1480 
443 
503 
790 
501 
136 
754 
357 
363 
801 

1082 

1481 
413 
446 
299 
488 
297 
323 
542 

1184 
578 


328 




14 


86 


-D 1- 


67 
17 


9 


525 


Bothwell 


280 












715 


Brockville • • 


92 
91 
16 
51 
31 

'72 
40 

•40 

70 

8 

16 


80 

■■"io 

■'"ii 
'"'.34 


338 
1585 


Clifton 

Clinton 


361 

207 
352 




711 




537 


Dundas 

Durham • • 

Gait 

Goderich 

Giiplnh 


203 
242 
430 
483 
1641 




404 


Kincardine 

Lindsay • 


512 


67 

"'78 
12 


8 

■■i7 


748 
80 


Meaford 

Milton 

Mitchell 

Napanee 

Niagara 


225 
381 






863 






51 






;79 




io 

12 

""35 
62 

78 
48 


■■■■4 

4 

51 


200 


QjjUia 


280 




342 
219 


Perth 

Peterboro' 


121 

103 

1501 

263 


Picton 


541 
146 




18 21 

14 

8 

26 


222 




• • . . 




264 


Cloafr»Tf>i 


540 








520 


St. Mary's 

St. Thomas 

Stratford 

Strathroy 

Thorold 






748 


21 




610 






515 


58 
20 




174 
212 




488 


Waterloo • 

"W^Allnnrl - . • . . . * . . . 


31 

""I6 
13 


11 


354 




424 




.. 




288 


Total 




16065 


11059 


12656 


7685 


1316 


260 


41939 


41858 


44725 


32634 


21742 



40 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



Schools of Ontario — Continued. 



DIFFERENT BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION. 



6 

3 

o 

c 

> 


Oliject Lessons. 


S 

Q 

- .2 

c8 O 

S a 

1 


Canadian History. 


English History. 


1 

w 

'ei 

Si 

<u 

C 


c 

'Sd 


Si 

< 


Geometry and Men- 
suration. 


Chemistry and Agri- 
culture. 


"a 
c 

P-i 

1 


S 

r 


a 

0) 



pq 


Drill & Calisthenics. 


127 
939 

547 


431 

612 
664 
251 
160 
499 

""i339 
281 
220 
497 
422 
255 
86 
212 
260 
582 
543 
659 
533 
630 
191 
207 
351 


359 
417 
377 
1L2 
393 
309 
699 
731 
184 
203 
484 
657 
388 
347 

448 

397 
1137 
449 
317 
816 
255 
219 
233 


58 
242 
311 

59 

72 
167 
613 

53 

315 

95 

226 

84 
208 
130 
336 
124 

68 
196 

80 

m 

i4i 

88 

62 

70 

27 

164 

79 
295 

62 
154 

i49 

60 
34 

72 
100 

18 
236 
351 

97 

61 
179 

49 
4 

16 
188 
288 


133 

123 

157 

29 

59 

68 

282 

266 

110 

52 

170 

52 

151 

187 

40 

145 

133 

334 

183 

131 

283 

80 

149 

30 

67 

188 

22 

39 

132 

89 

87 

35 

200 

104 

205 

133 

179 

146 

127 

26 

152 

110 

100 

167 

236 

281 

84 

104 

61 

179 

104 

40 

164 

290 

132 


2 

" " 'i7 

121 
'""92 
""■3 


84 
16 

""68 

80 

246 


38 
12 

■"'17 


26 

2 

76 

17 


13 
2 


15 


127 

'"84 


16 

14 

3 


88 
258 


231 






si 


760 








3 

40 
26 
28 
52 




260 


40 
88 
12 
30 
91 


20 
64 
10 
2 
35 








1941 

281 


34 


34 


266 


"265 


401 


■'"85 


'"28 




220 


728 
1037 


85 


85 


651 


470 
567 


37 
42 

""74 

"'83 

" "59 


37 
66 

'"'137 
172 

"■70 

58 

128 


57 
42 
40 
66 
8 
19 




51 
44 
10 
66 






""56 


103 
69 
29 
2 
8 
16 
70 


481 
60 


212 


""66 






860 
1124 


66 






1850 
197 


16 

70 








404 


577 










1172 
630 


69 


100 


10 


53 


125 


38 


1307 


38i 




78 
66 


17 
12 


70 
12 




60 




78 
5 


" ihb 












863 


594 


462 
139 
247 
350 
280 
507 
146 
612 
395 
1012 
443 
335 
649 
357 
156 
405 
198 
233 
524 
657 
903 
360 
355 
207 
488 
242 
243 
443 
636 
432 






4 


2 








7 


863 
















134 


201 
356 


"20 


37 



1 
30 


1 
2 








1 

6 
5 

"'"12 
12 

'"38 






















897 


391 


165 
163 
445 
381 
953 

sii 

479 
268 
520 
540 
287 
826 
745 
533 
493 
135 
304 
488 
.391 
324 
276 
846 
1128 


".[." \ 


'"'is 


""i2 








80 


121 


164 

'"gi 
9 


" "68 








514 


412 

989 

789 


"1 

62 
75 
99 
6 
12 
13 
26 


i 

32 
123 
51 
11 
12 
21 
26 





'"'i3 


"'36 


240 
200 


24 








71 

146 

12 














513 


12 

"'"io 
4 


1 






50 


26 ...... 

21 


100 


539 






4 




540 








520 


100 










520 


951 


















.30 

684 


'"i26 














5 




967 
















967 


261 


48 
'"179 


"""26 
' ' 'i64 


16 
20 
90 
18 


16 
20 

""46 




1 


42 

20 

'"*50 

2 

5 

24 




304 










'436 










629 














.... 


315 


587 
720 




63 


7 


. 47 
132 


47 





207 






















26686 


22037 


22387 


6605 


7330 


1399 


1673 


1156 


1240 


283 


270 


889 


1062 


8601 



41 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. o.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE C— The PubHc 



NUMBER or PUPILS IN T HE 





BEADING. 


O 

ft 

H 

io 
02 


to 
1 


_c5 

'-3 

© 

g 

< 




TOTAL. 


1st Reading- 
Book. 


2nd Reading 
Book. 


1 


ip 
1 


tp 
^ . 

(B o 


r 




Counties, &c 

Cities 


120729 
14680 
16065 

151474 
152002 


91268 

9033 

11059 

111360 
110796 


108310 
11178 
12656 


61016 
6028 

• 

7685 


14405 
2170 
1316 


492 
665 
260 


309916 
38650 
41939 


321083 
37809 
41858 


327099 314367 
39392 34400 


Towns 


44725 


32634 


Grand Total, 1878.... 
do do 1877.... 


132144 
133706 


74729 
72871 


17891 
19857 


1417 
1628 


390505 
386393 


400750 
396006 


4112161381401 
402248 375951 




528 


564 


1562 


1858 






4112 


4744 



8968 


5450 




1966 


211 






1 







42 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



Schools of Ontario — Concluded. 



DIFFERENT BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION. 









S 












i 


•S 


>. 


>» 




i 








o 


>, 












6D 


pC 


a_ 












U 


u 


1 b 


!>5 






§ 


<) 






a 


a 




a 
o 

o 


1 §1 

s 


1 


I 1 


O 

1 
2 


C 
'Sc 


0) 


c o 

bs 

<D QQ 


Is 
'a 


a: 

1 




tab 

a 

m 


u 

1=1 






^ 




c3 




=" i lIT' 




<D 


.£3 


o3 


o 






p 


> 


O 


O 


Q 


W 


C3 1 W 


<15 


o 


o 


^ 


ft 

1358 


m 


p 


109920 


104983 


113429 


175426 


41065 


49949 


6663 


17528 


10009 


9522 


1194 


1160 


7894 


21895 


29706 


36221 


27746 


22127 


7242 


6150 


2984 


11266 


2489 


2827 


425 


1423 


3787 


2641 


8917 


21742 


26686 


22037 


22387 


6605 


7330 


1399 


1673 


1156 


1240 


283 


270 


889 


1062 


8601 


161368 


167890 


163212 


219940 


54915 


63429 


11046 


30467 


13654 


13589 


1902 


2853 


6034 


11597 


39413 


153036 


168942 


146335 


226977 


43401 


59694 


13171 


18984 


11713 


11228 


3965 


3729 


3802 


12689 


2460 


8332 


1052 


16877 



7037 


1511 


3735 


2125 


11483 


1941 


2361 






2232 


1092 


14810 




2063 


876 



















43 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE D.— The Public 



PUBLIC SCHOOL 







TOTAL. 










RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS 


. 








u 






















<a 


-13 




-C 






















a 


"i 




^ 






'T 
















u 


■s 


TOTAL. 


'o 
o 








6 

'o 


c 












5 


O 




^ 




















c3 


s 














•g 






+a 
















.2 


-g 


Q 

% 
S 


^ 
^ 


o 


-ti 


8, 

tie 


3^ 




.2 
'43 


n3 




^ 


-^ 


g 


3 




■s 


P< 


R 


+= 


c3 


^ 


P. 




s 


(1) 


,C 


o 


h 






o 


P 


s 




3> 




Oh 


§ 


^ 


Q 


P^ 


Ph 


s 


m 


o 


1-1 


o- 


U 


« 


Counties, &c 


5342 


2807 


2535 


771 


562 


1690 


1772 


290 


77 


20 


17 


46 


58 


Cities 


530 


110 


420 


88 


133 


133 


142 


15 


17 










Towns 


601 


143 


458 


90 


94 


219 


138 


32 


12 


20 


17 


3 
49 


7 


Grand Total, 1878.... 


6473 


3060 


3413 


949 


789 


2042 


2032 


337 


106 


65 


1877 ... 


6468 


3020 


3448 


972 


812 


2022 


2005 


348 


« 


30 


17 


62 


54 


Increase 


5 


40 






• • • . 


20 


47 


.... 


9 


.. 


11 


Decrease 


.... 




35 


23 


23 


.... 




11^ 


.... 


10 




13 





44 



43 Yictoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



Schools of Ontario. 



TEACHERS. 















CERTIFICATES. 










ANNUAL SALARIES. 










6 






s 


^3 


-2 
















^H 








cS 






o 


O 


o 








^ 


^r\ 


,r^ 










o 






W 


m 


m 


^3 






+2 


■J^ 


aiTi 






33 


-g 


cS 


^ 


>. 


>, 


>5 





1 


'S 


'3 . 


^ 


& 


%^,^ 


i 


1 

g 

g 


P-l- 

o 


o 

'o 

1 


'53 

c 

1 


O 
1 
'o 

PM 


M 

o 


J 

o 


3 
-2 

CO 





c3 


CD 

.a 

1— 1 


Ph 
>> 

"^ 
m 

S 

"bo 


0) 


k1 




s 


How many Teac 
ever attended 
ronto or Ottaw 


5 




34 


5342 


73 


1031 


253 


123 




3406 


456 


800 


125 


382 


247 


791 




2 




530 


85 


204 


28 


6 




206 


1 


1000 


500 


730 


313 


209 






6 


601 


52 


174 


47 


13 


.... 


292 


2S 


1200 


200 


577 


274 


133 


5 


2 


40 


6473 


210 


1409 


328 


142 




3904 


480 


1200 


125 


544 


280 


1133 


5 


4 


40 


1 6468 


250 


1304 


371 


134 


14 


3926 


469 


1100 


100 


547 


280 


1084 






.... 


5 




105 




8 






11 


100 


25 






49 




2 






40 


.... 


43 




14 


22 


.... 


... 


... 


3 


.... 


.... 



45 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No 5.) 



A. 1880 



-The Public 





SCHOOLS. 


SCHOOL HOUSES. 


TITLE. 


SCHOOL 




S 
c 




o 
C 

0) 




















S 


TOTAL. 




o 


c 






1 


c 

















m 
0^ 




A 


A 


.^^- 

















tc 


ri 


c3 






o 








u 














c3 += 




zn 


TJl 


JC-g 














'0 


r: 










c 
1 


C 

d 


o ft 


Brick 

Stone 


1 


1-^ 


ci 



p 


+3 

a 


00 


3 






Counties, &c 


4751 


4700 


51 


1396 457 


2226 


697 


4776 


4626 


150 


907a 


4947 


1772 


Cities 


118 


116 


.... 74' 17 


17 


8 


116 


109 


7 


2285 


891 


104 


Towns 


174 


174 


.... 99 


37 


38 


... 


174 


167 


7 


1387 


2204 


200 


Grand Total, 1878,... 


5041 


4990 


51 


1569 


511 


2281 


705 


5063 

1 


4902 


164 


12745 


8042 


2076 


Do 1877.... 


5219 


5140 


79 


1445 


526 


2446 


731 


6148 i 


4927 


221 


12392 


7877 


2343 


Increase 






.... 124 












353 


165 




Decrease 


178 


150 


28 .. 


15 

1 


165 


26 1 82 


25 


57 

1 


.... 


.... 


267 



4() 



Sessional Papers (Xo. 5.) 



TABLE F.-THE ROilAS CATHOLIC SEPARATE SCHOOLS OF 0>TARIO. 



CitUtorfown..) 



Gletagkrry 

d*T\tlon ... 

LMdi 

R^itw".. '.'.'.. ".'.'.■' 
Lenuux kiul AddiiigUni 

PeterborooKh 

y"rk '!..".'...' "-".'. 

^■'" ■-■■"-'" 

MiddloMS 

Kent 

E«^i ...'.y.'.'.'.'.'.' ■■■ 

ToUl 

CITIES. 

Bflllcvillo .,., 

Bruitfdnl - 

Hamilton 

LoXn. ;!:.:"■'' 

Toronto *""'*' ■'i.-'. 
TotJ 

TOWNS. 



P, F 



TEACREBS. PUPILS K TOE DIFFEREST BKANCHES OF IXSTRCCTIOX, 



l| I I I 



i I I i I 






m 


s 




«.« 




m 


1?; 



72 S S S 



43A 908 310 



..." 




i 


f 


't 


•1 


f 


■!i 



Whitbr .-■ 


'■ 


-^ 






" 


ISJ8M 








TOTAL. 










as 


SSS8» 




T^-.:.: ■-'■■.:: 


xo « 1?^^ r 












Ou«oToiAU ICT .. 


iS 


l^U 


w - 


1 

IKCUAU 'l •■■- 

Diciuu * 


...'".•?. 


-iii-i.i.?':- 



I----I '•• 



■I *"l- 



43 Yictoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 



A. 1880 



TABLE G.— The 



SCHOOLS. 


MONEYS. 




Counties. 


Receipts. 




a 

o 
(.1 

<U 00 
Or-I 

a 

m 


Legislativ 

3 a: 

■8.2 

|l 

% c. 
431 25 
775 58 
577 63 
.564 73 
755 23 
563 48 
860 82 
981 83 
995 20 
441 00 
785 20 
2089 57 
481 23 
.521 13 

560 65 
475 00 

611 30 
436 00 

640 95 
885 40 

1336 40 
421 00 

1808 90 
511 75 
445 93 
654 13 
551 93 
699 78 
616 25 
736 80 
11 00 

1.535 07 
572 13 
889 25 
506 63 
858 03 

2726 40 
522 20 
702 93 
536 08 
449 43 

561 43 
1165 78 

638 03 

613 43 

1143 30 

603 13 

641 80 

612 13 
240 40 
698 25 
.552 03 
505 15 
712 05 
511 6S 
494 93 
542 83 
527 38 


e GTant.\ 

u 

$ c. 


Local Sources. 


High Schools. 


[ 


1 

|g 1 








Glenararrv 


S CI 

77 17 

145 81 

4 26 

65 14 


S c. 

858 00 

2315 01 

928 22 i 


S 0. 


-S c. 

500 00 

45 00 


S c. 
1866 42 


Almonte 

Amprior 

Aylmer 

Barrie 


T ^1 ■^ 

Lanark 


'"io .50 

7 20 

6 85 
73 83 
45 65 
50 40 
83 33 

""36' 26 
6 00 

"'68"46 
139 27 

'25 00 

"'42'27 

'"20 87 
6 36 


3281 40 
1520 61 


Elgin 


989 001 




6066 66 

25 

481 55 

90 00 

389 00 

69 00 

10676 81 


1626 07 


Simcoe 


995 23 705 00 

875 94 

1772 07 123 00 
2181 83 14 00 
2995 20 


8455 46 


Beamsville 

Belleville 

Berlin 

Bowmanville .... 


Lincoln 

Hastings 

Waterloo 

Durham 


309 13 

■ 360 74 


1748 80 
2755 89 
4026 80 
4154 23 


Bradford 

Brampton 

Brantf ord 

Brighton , . . , 

Brockville 


Simcoe 

Peel 

Brant 

Northumberland . . . 

Leeds 

Haldimand 

Northumberland . , . . 

Lanark 

Haldimand ; . . 

Kent 


3 53 

60 58 
290 63 
299 24 

87 18 
140 16 
121 77 

12 87 
295 74 


8.52 00 
1989 20 
2000 00 

981 23 
3350 00 

990 55 

779 67 
12.53 79 

835 .50 
2076 46 


32 00 
1835" 52 


1763 18 

2954 38 

16975 86 

1761 70 


95 50 





4090 07 
1697 36 


CampbeUf ord 







1376 44 
1877 96 


Cayuga 

Chatham 






1567 24 


367 00 


"767 75 
2225 00 
284 00 
1192 48 
1641 89 




3152 87 


Clinton 


Huron 


148 58 

241 56 

168 35 

36 41 

"47 84 

2 93 

62 59 

142 07 

137 88 

35 85 


1585 40 605 00 
400 00; 867 00 
405 00' 

3242 30; 

700 00 2.31 .50 


4071 40 


Cobourg 


Northumberland ... 

Northiamberland 

Simcoe ... 


5069 96 




1303 35 


CoUing\vood 


17020 09 


Stormont 

Welland 

"Wentworth 


3127 41 


DrummondviUe 


945 93 
1654 13 

891 93 
1212 .50 
1016 25 
1486 00 


10 00 


1449 70 
2311 19 






330 00 


1857 32 


Elora 


Wellington 

Leeds 

Wellington 

Welland .... 




14 55 

656 81 

1791 25 

8700 06 


2075 26 


Farmersville 

Fergus 




2427 19 
•4049 90 


FonthiU 




11 00 


Gait 

Gananoque * 


Waterloo 

Leeds 


44 

292 90 

646 87 

57 09 

318 00 


"".5'66 

24 25 

5 00 

"iso 66 

"23'68 

'"30'io 

'"li'43 
5 25 

5 75 

""7 25 
35 26 
10 67 


3535 07 

900 00 

6520 00 

667 38 

11010 61 

11763 59 


4261 06 


18031 64 
1770 03 
8080 37 


Grimsby 

Guelph 

Hamilton 


Lincoln 

Wellington 




1 66 


1237 76 
12186 64 


City 


1494 07 


170 00 
3 00 

5129 45 

733 09 

532 72 

6 75 

492 74 

75 00 


16304 06 


Hawkesbury 

Ingersoll 


Prescott 


64 37 

143 65 

40 99 

'""4 60 


1322 20i 


1911 77 


Oxford 

Dundas 

Grenville 

Brace 


1230 57 

963 50 

833 43 

1H66 4M 

1600 00 

718 53 


' 73' 66 

1636 "39 


2100 83 


Iroquois 


1613 .57 


Kemptville 

Kincardine 


1312 96 
7361 31 


Kingston 


City 


4546 69 


Lindsay 


Victoria 




1894 53 


Listowel 


Perth 


45 40 


12:'3 43i 

12267 27 60 00 
700 00 355 .50 


1889 01 


London 


City 


13963 31 


Markham 


York 


100 71 
103 98 


1834 34 


Mitchell 


Perth 

Dundas 


1295 10 




2()40 88 


Morrisburgh 


900 00 

660 00 

698 25 

1072 .59 

1000 00 


"276 '35 


"786'75 
5873 28 


1512 13 


Mount Forest 

Napanee 


Wellington 

Lennox ■ 


'■"'4'48 


1963 50 
7274 26 


Newburgh 




1624 62 


Newcastle 


Durham 


90 05 
224 92 
183 64 






:: 


1600 95 


Newmarket 


York 


11.50 00 1 507 64 


2594 61 


Niagara 


Lincoln 


853 03 

644 93 

1027 06 

1030 88 




1555 60 


Norwood 


Peterborough 





306 45 


1481 57 


Oakville 


Halton .... 


ioS 77 


1580 56 


Oakwood 





87 27 


1754 30 













Estimated- 



-Report not received. 

.50 



4:3 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



High Schools. 







MONEYS. 






PUPI 


LS AND TERMS OF 






Expenditure. 






ADMISSION. 


n 

o 

1 


5 08 


N.2 


C3-JH 

|g 

pq-J 

a ! 


'~0 

i 

X 

c -►^ 


> 


HI 
CJ 

C 
Is 


Ph si) 
C .S 

SI 


Fee per term of three months 
per pupil. 


$ c. 
1462 80 


S c. 

312 28 

600 00 

14 541 

67 531 

4875 42 

72 85 

126 14 

185 31 

170 00 

258 74 

729 72 

4767 69 

179 14 

'""367'01 

13 40 

100 00 

198 93 

425 60 

88 75 

70 00 

1 60 

174 64 

1046 21 

29 55 

'si'io 

109 37 

400 00 

2485 63 


$ c. 


$ c. 
10 53 
140 59 
291 19 
124 53 
207 63 
196 82 
289 75 
*901 97 
550 88 
272 13 


S c. 
1785 61 
2440 59 
1517 73 
1522 46 
7886 31 
1569 67 
2665 89 
3831 25 
3620 05 
1666 67 
2872 18 

16975 86 
1427 60 
3497 33 
1588 71 
1376 44 
1137 30 
1379 44 
2969 66 
3706 99 
5012 14 
966 07 

17020 09 
3127 41 
1413 22 
2310 92 
1749 69 
1755 73 
2427 19 
3737 76 
11 00 

18012 91 
1770 03 
7595 99 
1237 76 
9575 31 

16304 06 
1783 77 
2037 96 
1593 84 
1312 96 
7132 32 
4546 69 
1894 .53 
1881 62 

13963 31 
1680 10 
18.33 14 
1512 13 
1819 85 
6755 62 
1624 62 
1389 07 
2168 44 
15.54 43 
1481 57 
1.580 56 
1453 27 


$ c. 

80 81 
840 81 
2 88 
103 61 
569 15 
179 13 

90 00 
195 55 
534 18 

96 51 

82 20 


56 

117 

59 

92 

102 

49 

194 

123 

100 

37 

100 

280 

61 

98 

92 

36 

76 

41 

116 

100 

132 

30 

271 

60 

49 

82 

55 

82 

79 

96 


Free. 


1700 00 




Free. 


1191 00 
1306 00 
2780 52 
1300 00 


21 00 
24 40 

22 74 


Free. 

Free to County. 

S2 00. 

Free. 


2250 00 




$4 00 to non-residents. 


2727 50 
2750 00 
1044 50 
2041 66 


16 47 

149 17 

91 30 

100 80 

246 99 

20 00 

72 52 

12 45 

18 40 


Free. 
Free. 
75 cents. 
Free. 


6383 00 


*5578 18 

103 46 

*1524 SI 

217 58 

97 98 

87 30 

109 11 

344 47 

• 676 44 

*1616 48 

114 47 

*11535 46 

300 85 

122 37 

610 92 

535 17 

99 39 

269 53 

151 12 


i§4 00. 


1125 00 
1900 00 

991 G7 
1246 66 

950 00 


334 10 
592 74 
108 65 

"'"740'66 
187 80 
183 21 
364 41 
57 82 
337 28 


Free. 

.$4 50 to non-residents. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 


1060 00 
2032 42 
2636 33 
3325 66 


11 40 
167 17 
305 47 


Free. 

$1 00. 

$3 r,0 and §4 00. 

§1 75 and $3 50. 


800 00 
5309 99 


50 00 


Free. 
Free. 


1690 00 




90 35 


83*42 

44 47 


.$1 50 and §2 00. 


1261 30 
1700 00 
1100 00 
1502 50 
1757 66 


36 48 

27 

107 63 

319 53 


Free. 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 


1101 01 




312 14 


Free. 


n 00 






6532 50 
1400 00 


'*' iso'oo 

4748 01 
34 01 

6460 02 

263 90 

40 44 

56 58 


54 40 
10 00 
49 25 
10 00 


*11426 01 

210 03 

483 73 

18 25 

365 29 

2937 47 

93 33 

217 37 

346 51 

68 42 

*2301 37 

*507 42 

116 45 

537 82 

729 96 

75 10 

233 14 


18 73 


270 
60 

148 
40 

176 

567 
89 

112 

•55 
89 
57 

132 
77 

105 

297 
65 
88 

102 
61 

122 
65 
41 
1 60 
47 
56 
47 
40 


$5 00. 
Free. 


2315 00 
1175 50 


484 38 


Free. 
Free. 


2750 00 


2611 33 

*"'i28 66 

62 87 
19 73 


Free. 


12328 89 
1650 00 


773 80 


S4 00. 
Free. 


1716 65 
1247 33 


47 36 


Free. 
$1 00. 


1175 00 


9 34 
3396 18 

109 77 


60 20 
12 00 
31 87 
33 08 


Free. 


1422 27 
3897 63 


228 99 


Free. 
Free. 


1745 00 




$4 50. 


1300 00 


43 80 
7833 35 


7 39 


Free. 


5400 00 




$1 ;";0 to non-residents. 


1605 00 


154 24 

207 74 


S3 00. 


1600 00 






Free. 


1512 13 






Free. 


1193 35 
2433 51 
1444 44 


276 84 

38 20 

9 00 

106 97 

325 99 

66 40 

' 37 49 

36 19 

27 80 


53 50 


*296 16 

*4283 91 

171 18 

84 25 

242 45 

167 93 

• 107 26 

123 03 

214 74 


143 65 
518 64 

""2ii'88 

426 17 

1 17 


$2 00. 
Free. 
Free, 


1186 35 
1600 00 
12;K) 00 
1263 33 


11 50 

3616 

73 49 
21 M 
15 73 


Free. 
$4 00. 
Free. 
Free. 


1400 00 
1195 00 


""'36l'63 


Free. 
Free. 



i 



* Including the retirement of notes, &c. 

51 






43 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 18H0 



TABLE G.— The 



SCHOOLS. 






MONEYS 










Counties. 


Receipts. 




c 
Is 


Legislative Grant. 


Local Sources. 




High Schools. 


3 
p5 "" 


d 
ft - 
J3_N 


ft.S 


i 




l-L 

Si 

i 





Omemee 


Victoria 

Wellington 

Simcoe 


S cts. 

5 68 

63 90 


S cts. 
457 08 
575 63 
539 65 
692 37 

1574 90 
970 33 
549 90 
623 CO 
608 80 
5J3 93 
814 75 

1515 40 
607 68 
484 48 
958 57 

1119 24 
518 35 
563 03 
461 95 
639 30 
570 90 
524 83 
454 53 
531 13 
715 96 
848 84 
439 50 

2150 90 

1198 40 
983 25 
633 60 
533 73 

2108 40 
541 53 
724 87 
528 43 
496 03 
685 00 
531 68 
948 85 
615 63 
549 63 

1026 74 
486 33 
600 18 
610 13 


S cts. 


' i8'32 
42 00 

"'.36"66 

11 00 

22 00 

9 50 


S cts. 

475 58 

667 34 

1976 28 

2416 58 

10677 65 

1661 67 

8.51 90 

2123 00 

833 80 

804 42 

2184 20 

5509 83 

6107 68 

423 23 

1700 00 

1894 24 

522 10 

1.576 83 

649 75 

975 00 

1625 05 

1374 20 

810 95 

996 63 

1457 01 

1798 84 

996 00 

5830 00 

1636 00 

7417 93 

1200 00 

2533 73 

3981 58 

1141 53 

924 87 

528 43 

320 44 

1485 00 

1121 68 

948 85 

1465 63 

970 00 

3042 23 

1097 03 

2711 23 

1.560 13 


S cts. 


S cts. 
874 84 
244 77 
221 70 

"6364 "64 


$ cts 
1813 18 


Orangeville 


1551 53 


Orillia 


118 04 
"717"66 


2874 02 


Oshawa ...... 


Ontario . . 

City 

Grey 


'ii8"89 


3150 95 


Ottawa 


19452 48 


Owen Sound 


2662 00 


Pakenham 


Lanark 


360 19 

77 96 
7 90 

2860 05 

"i38'28 




"391*65 
869 84 


1772 99 


Paris 


Brant 


2845 96 


ParkhiU 

Pemljroke 


Middlesex 

Renfrew 

Lanark 

Peterborough! . . . 
Prince Edward. . 
Norfolk 


1460 00 
1700 00 


Perth 

Peterborough . . . 
Picton 




10 00 

12 29 

6 49 


280 66 
895 63 


7008 84 
7930 86 
6865 93 


Port Dover 





362 55 
4 00 

46 00 
235 55 

47 20 
254 75 

11 18 


1276 75 


Port Hope 

Port Perry 


Durham - . . . 
Ontario 


189 29 


497 00 





3348 86 
3059 48 


Norfolk 




""i69'66 
6 37 

'""ii'66 
""ii 00 

51 17 


1276 00 


Prescott 

Renfrew 


Grenville 

Renfrew 

York 


1028 '82 
68 48 


2356 12 
2395 27 


Eichmond Hill 




122 00 


1822 33 


Sarnia 


Lambton 

Norfolk 


2195 95 




15 00 




1914 03 


Smith's Falls 

Smithville 

Stratford ....... 


Lanark 

Lincoln 

Perth 

Middlesex 

Peel 

City 

Perth 


"".51 39 
384 90 

69 61 
314 27 

81 59 
686 30 

*"47'66 
139 42 
378 42 


2666 66 

9 50 
18032 83 

2739 '76 


4176 48 

158.S 65 

20590 70 


Strathroy 

Streetsville 

St. Catharines . . . 


34 75 
"936"66 


2763 04 

1800 94 

11737 69 


St. Marv'sf .... 




3550 70 




Elgin 


110 70 



42 35 
86 67 

"'25"66 
6 00 

■""36"66 
73 54 
70 60 


'4477 "'7.5 


"'20066 


8511 88 


Sydenham 

Thorold 

Toronto 


Frontenac ... 

Welland 

City 


2080 60 

3249 23 

11032 82 




Hastings 


105 40 


1788 46 


Uxbridge 

A^ankleekHilL... 


Ontario 

Prescott 

Elgin ... 
Bruce 


7 86 
130 81 

'""60"59 

13 52 

71 41 

136 32 

25 25 


1657 60 




407 49 

600 00 

1356 36 

21 00 


1620 16 
1422 47 


Walkerton 


"270" 66 


3586 95 


Wardsville 

TVaterdown 


Middlesex 

Wentworth 

Welland 

York 


1723 88 
2312 65 


Welland 

Weston 


5958 76 
4 90 


8246 94 
1549 78 


Whitby 

William stown ... 


Ontario 




4068 97 


Glengarry , . . 
Essex 


76 93 






36 25 


1696 54 


Windsor 


■ 




3311 41 


Woodstock 


Oxford 


487 31 


268 50 

21581 20 
20752 93 


12 00 


2938 07 










Total for 1878 

Total for 1877 


13810 61 
16666 93 


J77106 30 
75158 78 


1796 95 
15(i3 05 


202848 13 
158794 06 


103045 26 
84585 05 


420188 45 
357520 80 


Increase, .... 




1947 52 


233 90 


44054 07 


828 27 


18460 21 


62667 65 


Decrease 




2856 32 
















1 ": 



+ Estimated. Report not received. 

J In addition to the above S77106.30, the sum of .$1620 was granted for Meteorological observations. 



52 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



Hich Schools. — Coticluded. 



MONEYS. 



Expenditure. 



K 



C ^n 



Ph 



.S cts. 
1198 75 
1300 00 
1351 66 
2637 50 
6100 00 
2600 00, 
1012 50 
1700 00 I 
1140 00 I 
12.50 00; 
2100 00 
50(50 00 
1450 00 
1150 00 
2709 58 
2863 001 
12-26 75 
1562 .50 
1200 00 
1404 75 
1591 67 
14.50 00 
1162 00 
1264 00 
2791 70 
2375 021 

989 45 
7280 17 
3000 00 1 
2966 661 
16.50 00 
1549 99! 
9225 00: 
1250 00' 
1500 00 
1315 50 
1175 50 
2025 00 
1000 00 
1700 00 
1637 04 
1215 00 
3367 50 
1497 07 
2247 90 
2550 00 

22.3010 22: 
211607 55' 



S cts. 

' i8'26 
955 36 
274 41 
325 82 



334 75 


171 49 


75 00 


450 00 


2507 06 


600 00 


4763 04 


23 05 


261 01 


'24905 


128 00 


112 71 


212 81 


464 03 


2900 00 


67 12 


10249 69 


""411 '43 


1666 08 


100 00 


4797 98 


144 50 


1395 90 


281 95 


131 00 



118 00; 
139 62 



765 50 
166 84 



83968 96 
51417 36 



11402 67 32551 60 



% cts.i 



36 64 
84 00 
34 271 
62 00 
22 00; 
44 00 ' 
19 00' 



$ cts. 
604 98 
158 08 
492 66 
155 04 
*12984 68 

"'l34'i.5 

308 62 
188 40 



20 00 
24 58' 
12 98 



40 74! 



338 12! 
23 .39' 
94 07 1 
57 121 



*1520 56 

*1949 28 

564 20 

90 72 

353 54 

153 40 

49 25 

206 45 

167 22 

112 80 

3.34 35 



22 00 1 
I 



25 03 
117 35 



221 40 



92 35 
228 83 



30 00 



119 35 
96 21 


99 37 
30 00 


111 03 

168 11 
6240 83 


75 20 
149 16 
141 20 



77 00 



39 00 
30 00 



5126 94 
4387 30 



92 48 

99 12 
349 04 
336 61 
139 17 
2702 561 
450 70 
525 841 
211 89' 
204 68 
994 86 i 
115 09' 

99 10 ! 

85 94 

120 76' 

*1561 951 

364 15' 

55 75' 
219 89 
161 74| 
484 85; 
131 60 
259 01' 
169 32 



$ cts.! 
1803 731 
1476 28 
2836 32 
3150 95 
19444 17! 
2662 001 
1.503 40 
2224 11 
1422 40 ' 
1700 001 
6128 22 
7629 28 
6801 821 
1276 751 
3324 13! 
30.57 14 
1276 00 

23.56 121 
1518 61! 
1724 33 
2195 95 
1914 03 
4176 48 
1430 24 

13390 43' 
2736 661 

16.57 401 
11648 81 

3550 70! 
8.511 881 
2006 39! 
3242 92 
10730 64 
1496 09 
1629 10 
1620 16 
1422 47 
3586 95 
1550 38 
2073 02 
8238 96 
1494 74 i 
40(i8 971 
1628 67 
.3311 41 ! 
2916 16' 



PUPILS AND TERMS OF 
1 ADMISSION. 



739 64 



83904 07 396010 19 
70297 98 343710 19 



« 



$ cts. 

9 45 

75 25 

37 70 

""s'si 

'269 '59 

621 851 

37 60; 






Fee per term of three 
months per pupil. 



880 62 

301 58 

64 11 

"24'73 
2 34! 



876 661 
98 00 



158 41 

7200 27 

26 38 

143 54 



74 21 

6 31] 

302 18 

292 37; 

28 50 



173 50 1 

239 631 

7 98! 

55 04' 



67 87 1 



21 911 

I. 



74 

72 

78 

111 

217 

161 

45 

54 

54 

54 

144 

221 

86 

54 

149 

118 

36 

67 

46 

87 

105 

75 

55 

45 

154 

104 

21 

264 

182 

224 

74 

60 

302 

79 

72 

60 

59 

98 

42 

118 

75 

51 

142 

53 

94 

105 



24178 26' 
1.3810 61 1 



10574 
9229 



7606 09 52300 00 10367 65' 1345 



Free. 

Free. 

75c. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

$4.00. 

.50c. resident ; $2.00 non-res. 

Free. 

Free. 

$2.00. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

$2.00. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

$4.00 to non-residenta. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

$5.00. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

$1.50. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

25c. 

Free. 

$1.00. 



* Including the retirement of notes, &c. 



53 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. •'>.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE H.— The 



NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF 





SUBJECTS. 






-a 




i 






-3 
■3 

u 

a 

a 

















g 






Q 








HIGH SCHOOLS. 


o 


^ 




1 
'3 




a 


1 

to 








^ 


§ 


C^ 


H 


a 

c^ 


_& 


c . 










c3 


O 6 

^ S.1 




ifi g 


.J3 

a 


ft 


S.2 







c 








o 


a. 2 


a 

a 


u 




1 
"S 


1 

bo 


0) 

g 




o 




O 


^- 


Ph 


^ 


1— 1 1, 


< 


<5 







a 


g 


a 


c 




;- 


i3 


a 






M 


1— 1 


1— 1 


1— 1 


1— 1 


1— ( 


t-t 


1— 1 

38 


'"' 


Alexandria 




36 


36 


36 


36 




11 


36 


36 


Ahnmit.p 




117 


117 


117 


117 


117 


20 


117 


117 


117 


Ampi'ior 


59 


59 


59 


59 


59 


16 


23 


59 


59 


59 


Aylmer 




92 
102 


92 
302 


92 
102 






30 
38 


92 
102 


92 
102 


91 


Barrie 


102 


32 


26 


102 


Beamsville 


49 


49 


49 


' 49 


49 




19 


49 


49 


45 


Belleville 




194 


194 


194 


172 


140 


31 


194 


194 


121 


Berlin 




123 


123 


87 


40 




30 


123 


123 


123 






100 

37 

100 


100 

37 

100 


100 

37 

100 


100 
37 
30 




30 

8 

30 


100 

37 

100 


100 

18 

100 


100 


Bradford ... 




16 


Brampton , . . . . 


100 


100 


Brautf ord 




280 
61 
98 
92 
36 


220 
61 
98 
92 
36 


175 
61 
98 
92 
36 


150 
61 
98 
92 
36 


150 


65 
20 
35 
14 
6 


280 
61 
98 
92 
36 


280 
61 
98 
92 
36 


280 


Brighton 




51 


Brockville 




87 


Caledonia 




92 


Campbellf ord 




32 


Carleton Place 




76 


76 


76 


76 




54 


76 


76 


76 


Cayuga 




41 


41 


41 


41 




9 


41 


41 


39 






116 
100 


116 
100 


116 
100 


116 

45 




30 
60 


116 
100 


116 

85 


116 


Clinton 


166 


85 


Cobourg 




132 


o 


50 


40 


20 


24 


132 


120 


120 


Colbome 




30 
271 


30 

271 


30 
245 


2 
119 






30 
271 


30 
271 


12 


Collingwood 


.... 


25 


88 


271 


Cornwall 




60 
49 


60 
49 


60 
49 


60 


60 
37 


23 
15 


60 
49 


60 
49 


60 


Dmmmondville 




49 


Dundas 




82 


82 


82 


82 


82 


72 


82 


82 


82 


Dunnville 




55 
82 
79 
96 
270 
60 


55 
50 
79 
96 
140 


35 
82 
79 
96 
270 
60 






24 
30 

18 


55 

82 
79 
96 
270 
60 


55 
81 
79 
96 
183 
60 


55 


Elora 




50 
23 
96 
270 
56 


50 


81 


Farmersville .... 




79 






94 


Gait 


19 


5 
6 


180 


Gananoque 




56 


Godericli 




148 
40 


148 

12 


148 
40 


84 
40 




60 


148 
40 


148 
20 


145 


Grimsby 




11 


Guel]3h 




176 


176 


176 


130 




40 


176 


176 


176 


Hamilton , . . . 




567 

88 

104 


5()7 
88 
71 


567 

68 

104 


4.50 
27 
30 


450 


450 
32 
17 


567 

88 

104 


567 

88 

104 


567 






88 


Ingersoll 




92 


Iroquois 




55 


00 


55 


40 




6 


55 


50 


44 


Kemptville 


89 


34 


39 


39 


18 


39 




39 


35 


21 


Kincardine 




57 
132 


57 
132 


57 
132 


57 
88 


"28' 


26 
56 


57 
132 


57 
132 


57 


Kingston 


132 


132 


Lindsav" 




77 


77 


77 


77 


50 


34 


77 


77 


77 


Listowel 




105 


105 


105 


40 




34 


105 


73 


59 






297 
62 
88 

102 
61 

122 


297 
62 
88 

102 
61 

122 


297 
40 
88 

102 
61 

122 


297 
30 
43 

102 
61 

106 


"30 
20 
84 


191 

12 

46 

1 65 

i 8 
38 


267 
65 
88 

102 
61 

122 


297 
65 
86 

102 
61 

122 


297 


Markham .... 


88 
102 


60 


Mitchell 


68 


Morrisburgh 


90 




61 


Napanee 


122 


109 



54 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



High Schools. 



INSTRUCTION AND MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



6 

'Sb 
o ■' 
1-5 

c 

M 


-£3 

s 

o 

a 
o 

c 


1" 
1 
c 

CD 




s 


1 

c 

c 

< 

a 

it> 

c 


>> 

c 
c 




a 




1 

1— 1 





t ' 

s 
g 

> 

c 

> 



MH 

i 

a 


i 

a 


1— 1 


.s 

1— ( 


CD 

1— ( 




! 

'S 

cS 

S 

s 



1— 1 








36 
117 


31 
117 

59 

92 
102 

49 
194 


5 
10 

9 
26 
38 
19 
991 














12 
53 
12 
25 
43 


2 
9 

I 
4 

8 






4 

7 
1 


4 
59 


35 
9 
30 
38 
19 
22 
50 
25 








46 

6 
14 
41 

5 

93 
31 
35 

6 
32 
93 

7 
52 
17 

6 
20 
11 
60 
33 
45 

4 

"le" 

16 
32 
12 

18 
29 
15 
168 
32 


"2" 

"62" 
3 

■■■4" 
20 

■"s" 
'"s" 

6 

2 


26 




30 : 92 

102 ' 102 








20 




12 










1 

194 

123 

35 


49 

194 

123 

100 

37 

100 

280 

61 

98 

92 

36 






26 3 













51 
44 
48 
16 
50 

140 
17 
42 
17 
22 
23 
11 
40 
23 

122 


3 

9 

10 


63 




8 
8 


102 1 21 
100 25 





















37 
100 
280 
61 
98 
92 
36 
76 






12 


"ioo' 






6 
37 


100 

300 

12 


30 
65 

5 
23 
14 

8 
9(1 


36 
110 
10 
23 
14 
10 
25 
7 
20 
60 
24 




is 

73 
2 
3 










70 






























.... 








5 1 - - 








5 

2 










76 












"3" 

8 

'14" 


"iie' 

60 
30 

60 


41 
116 
100 
120 

29 
269 


41 7 












116 

100 

120 
30 

169 
60 
49 
82 
55 
82 
79 
96 

270 
60 

148 
40 

176 

506 
88 

104 
55 
29 
57 

108 
77 

105 

297 
60 
88 

102 
6J 

122 


20 
60 
25 


5 
14 
54 

3 
21 

5 












40 
30 










8 

10 184 

■ 30 

25 

."^2 






78 
23 


78 
23 








75 






25 1 49 




1 




1 1 




..... 



82 
"30' 


82 
55 
82 
79 
96 

140 
60 

148 
20 

176 

506 
88 

104 
55 
34 
57 
80 
77 

105 

297 
60 
88 

102 
61 

122 


15 
26 
30 
18 
20 
46 

6 
44 

1 

15 

140 

22 

12 

5 

"26* 
35 
10 
39 
91 
11 
9 
32 
28 
17 


15 
26 
30 
48 
20 
107 
12 
52 

""is" 

126 

30 

16 

5 








2 

u • 

5 

5 
42 

3 

6 

1 
12 
49 

1 

4 

6 


25 










"'9" 
3 

"37" 


11 
52 
33 
16 

228 
23 
39 
14 
89 

256 
13 
29 
30 
24 
19 

107 
28 
17 

106 


"65' 
32 




16 
3 
4 


60 

21 

148 

10 

176 

567 

88 

21 

30 




35 




270 




""10 

" i64 




... . 


62 

11 1 


20 




7 
62 


"i63' 




37 

374 
27 
26 
11 


14 

68 

'"2" 


* 2i8' 




3 
























57 
50 

77 

"27i' 


26 
42 
50 
39 
65 
12 

9 
38 

7 
47 








9 
36 
15 
16 
103 
12 
13 


"u" 

6 

2 

40 


6 

28 
4 
8 






4 
1 
3 
5 








104 




















26 1 "> 






9 

'4' 
17 


9 

102 

28 

41 






20 
34 
38 
49 


7 
4 

2 






10 






23 1 1 


28 








22 1 














14 


16 


72 



00 



48 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 



TABLE H.— The 



NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF 



SUBJECTS. 



HIGH SCHOOLS. 


1 

o 

1 

1 

Q 

a 
1— 1 


^3 
OS 

O 6 

^ 'B 


c 

o 
O 

a 

1— ! 


.i 

n 

•3 

si 
11 

"a 

M 


a 

a 
1 


.s 
i 

a 


'0 

3 

S 



«^ 
•|§ 

%i 

'0 a 
<= 3 




■■§ 
s 

1. 

< 

a 

h- ! 


i 
1 

bo 

1— 1 


1 






65 

41 

60 

47 

56 

47 

40 

74 

72 

78 

111 

217 

161 

45 

54 

54 

54 

144 

221 

86 

5i 

149 

118 

36 

67 

46 

87 

105 

75 

55 

45 

154 

104 

21 

264 

182 

224 

73 

60 

302 

79 

72 

60 

59 

98 

42 

118 

75 

51 

142 


65 

41 

60 

47 

42 

47 

40 

52 

72 

78 

111 

217 

93 

45 

54 

54 

54 

144 

221 

86 

54 

149 

118 

36 

67 

46 

87 

105 

75 

55 

45 

154 

104 

21 

264 

182 

224 

73 

60 

227 

79 

72 

60 

59 

98 

42 

118 

75 

51 

142 


65 

41 

60 

47 

56 

47 

40 

52 

72. 

78 

111 

217 

154 

45 

54 

64 

54 

144 

221 

86 

54 

149 

118 

36 

67 

46 

87 

105 

76 

55 

45 

154 

104 

21 

264 

182 

224 

73 

60 

300 

79 

72 

60 

59 

98 

42 

118 

70 

51 

142 


65 
23 
60 
47 
33 
35 
40 
37 
21 

'70 

217 

102 

45 

54 

54 

28 

144 

106 

46 

20 

104 

78 

36 

67 

46 


18" 
■■■■4 


10 
4 
6 
13 
27 
14 
14 
37 


65 

41 

60 

47 

56 

47 

40 

74 

72 

78 

111 

217 

161 

45 

54 

.54 

54 

144 

221 

86 

54 

149 

118 

36 

67 

46 

87 

105 

75 

55 

45 

154 

104 

21 

264 

182 

224 

73 

60 

302 

79 

72 

60 

59 

98 

42 

118 

75 

51 

142 


60 

37 

50 

40 

41 

47 

40 

42 

72 

78 

109 

217 

161 

45 

54 

54 

64 

144 

221 

86 

54 

149 

118 

36 

67 

46 

87 

106 

75 

55 

45 

154 

104 

21 

264 

182 

224 

73 

60 

302 

79 

60 

60 

59 

98 

42 

lis 

75 

51 

142 


62 






39 






50 


Niagara 


47 


37 
35 


Oakville 




31 






40 


Omeinee 


74 


42 
64 


OriUia ! 


29 
63' 

"166" 

106 

86 

■"72 
94 

"67' 


28 
29 
121 
68 
12 
38 
12 
10 

"*i9 

23 
10 
45 
64 

8 
17 

8 
42 
72 
41 
56 
16 
88 
30 

7 
92 
182 
81 
30 
20 
203 
10 
12 

8 
17 
98 

8 
55 1 

"io' 

107 


78 






109 






217 




iei 

45 


161 


Pakenham 


44 
54 


Parkhill 




54 


Pembroke 




54 


Perth 




144 


Peterborough 




221 






85 


Port Dover 


54 


54 




149 






118 


Port Rowan 




36 






66 


Renfrew 




46 






87 


Samia 


105 
75 
55 
18 

154 
50 
10 

145 

182 
83 
73 
20 

230 

""46' 
60 
59 
98 
42 
118 
65 
51 
142 


105 
"55' 

" "i64' 
'76' 

" 'iso' 

30 
"20 

46' 

8 
22 

"' 68' 


105 






43 


Smith's Falls 




55 


SmithviUe . 




43 


Stratford 




154 


Strathroy 




104 


Streetsville .... 

St. Catharines 




21 
264 






182 


St. Thomas 


224 
74 


154 


Sydenham 

Thorold 


73 

60 




302 


262 




79 




.. .. 


56 


VankleekHiU 


60 
57 






98 






42 






118 


Welland 




75 






41 


Whitby 




112 









56 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



High Schools. — Continued. 



INSTRUCTION, AND MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



SUBJECTS. 



10 



4 
20 



1 

4 

1 
16 I 
10 ! 

5 

2 



10 



6.5 
10 
10 
14 
34 



.55 
10 

154 

30 

2 

264 
10 

224 
73 
1 
27 
23 
35 



75 
217 
161 
45 
38 
30 
20 
43 

'46 
19 

'iis' 

18 
40 
46 
30 

42 



98 
'46' 



15 
64 



65 
40 
60 
47 
44 
47 
40 
42 
72 
78 
HI 
217 

leo 

44 

54 

54 

54 

144 

221 

86 

54 

149 

118 

36 

67 

46 

87 

105 

75 

55 

45 

154 

104 

21 

264 

182 

224 

72 

60 

300 

79 

72 

60 



O 



65 
40 
60 

47 
56 

47 



42 

72 

78 

111 

217 

161 

44 

54 

54 

54 

144 

221 

86 

54 

149 

118 

36 

67 

46 

87 

105 

75 

55 

45 

1.54 

104 

21 

264 

182 

224 

72 

60 

300 

79 

72 

60 



59 


59 


98 


98 


42 


42 


118 


118 


75 


75 


51 


51 


142 


142 



10 

3 
10 

2 
26 

5 
14 
11 
21 

8 

9 
20 
68 

7 
38 
12 

3 
16 
19 
21 
19 1 
99 
70 

3 

9 

8 
26 
14 

2 
55 

6 
12 
30 

2 
92 
15 
81 
30 



25 

9 

12 

10 

8 

15 

10 

28 

8 

12 
20 



10 

1 

15 

2 

26 

4 

13 

42 

19 

9 

9 

18 

68 

6 

38 

12 

2 

16 

19 

21 

12 

35 

70 

6 

9 

8 

49 

14 

75 

55 

6 

48 

30 

3 

92 

15 

81 

30 



240 
9 
12 
20 
14 
15 
10 
28 
8 
12 
25 



75 






18 



o 



14 



35 



45 



51 



10 
22 
30 
28 
22 
20 

1 
21 
24 
45 
35 
124 
51 

5 
25 
17 
16 
45 
67 
40 
33 
47 
30 
11 
22 



25 
166 
34 
16 
25 

6 
35 
11 
54 
13 

8 
79 



6 
28 



53 
2 



6 
16 
32 
9 
21 
21 
18 
19 
26 
26 
21 

195 
72 
27 
48 
16 
38 
83 
81 
29 
27 
35 
32 
13 
14 
8 
52 
32 
34 
7 
20 
84 
22 
15 

154 
91 

127 
10 
20 

148 
17 
30 
22 
10 
34 
9 
65 
54 
30 
70 



1 

6 
12 



6 

38 

14 

5 

1 

4 

9 

6 

9 

5 

3 

10 

26 

"2 

2 
17 

2 
12 

"3' 

5 

5 

5 

20 

30 

5 

6 

6 

34 

4 

7 

6 

2 

8 

2 

14 

11 

2 

24 



90 



36 

'eo' 



16 



95 

"72 
10 

'iso 
"30 
"27" 



54 



57 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 18S0 



TABLE H.— The High 



NUMBER OF PUPILS IX THE V.AJIIOUS BRANCHES OF 



HIGH SCHOOLS. 



WiUiamstowii . 

Windsor 

Woodstock , . 



Total for 1878, 
Do 1877. 

Increase 

Decrease 



53 



SUBJECTS. 



















eS 




^ 




c3 








C 




H 








^ p 


o 




& 


s 


c S 


o 


^a 


O 


a 


a 


1 M 


M 



P^ 



1^ 

Mm 



1977 
1384 



593 



53 

94 

105 



53 

94 

105 



53 

94 

102 



10486 I 9844 

I 

8819 I 8772 



1667 1072 



10184 
8762 



1422 



7683 
6857 

826 



20 



2881 
2755 



126 



'^ 








u 








<» 




s 




g 




o 




O 












c 




cS 




fee 




C w 




£".2 


o 




o J3 


« 


v^ 


a 


-^s 


-t3 






«^ 




1— 1 


h-l 



20 
20 
26 



53 ! 45 45 

94 j 94 I 94 

I 

105 I 105 I 86 



4011 
3621 



390 



104.50 
9227 



1223 



10212 



9713 



8678 8113 



1534 i 1600 



58 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



Schools. — Concluded. 



INSTRUCTION, AND MISCELLANEOUS INSTRUCTION. 



SUBJECTS. 





















-tJ 






























a 




















S 










s 


















































c 










<l> 




















2 




o 






> 










d 




>> 

u 

s 






CO 

< 

-a 


,£3 

O 

IS 


< 

(3 

cS 

>. 


1 


^ 


C5 

'> 
O 

o 










P 




O 


S 


b 




-a 


"« 


'^ 




c 


.G 


c 






% 


o 
'Si 


o 
bo 


s 


5 


fcD 
O 




2 

a) 


^ 




S 


o 


S 


a 




s 


o 




§ 


• ■-1 




cS 


.J3 


s 


.C 






0) 


cS 


l-> 


>. 


i-J 


H 


W 


O 


l2i 


Q 


^ 


P:^ 


W 


Ph 


Cs 


h^l 


o 


o 


j3 


a 


c 


c 


c 


g 


(3 


c 


fl 


a 


c 


c 


fl 


fi 


a 


M 


1— 1 


'-' 


■-^ 


1— i 


1— 1 


1— 1 


H- 1 


1— 1 


I— 1 


hH 


1— 1 


i-i 


1— 1 


1— 1 








53 

94 

103 


53 

94 

103 


40 
3 

28 


40 

28 


18 


40 






21 
31 
42 


2 
2 
5 






3 
3 


30 

28 





31 
11 


2 
5 


























429 


5383 


9855 


10074 


2375 


2979 


242 


328 


270 


3588 


516 


4729 


883 


1822 


9 


359 


4435 


9106 


9158 


2168 


2547 


325 


539 


118 


3091 


442 


4955 


871 


1067 




70 


948 


749 


916 


207 


432 




152 


497 


74 


226 


12 


755 


9 




83 


211 





















69 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE H.— The 



MISCELLANEOUS 













3 

o 


1 






1 













13 




o 


cd 


P. 


o 


.« 


>» 








"c 




o 


m 


o 




m 


f 




a 




£ 






'a 


£ 


xn 


a 


a? 








^ 


n3 


*4-l 




CC 






7H 3 


High Schools. 






a) 


C 
3 

o 
u 
bo 


o 




'o 

o 

o 


a 
^ 

§ 


3 


11 

ri 3 




§ 


;i5 




^ 




T3 

s 


a 


"S 


o 




1 


xn 




1 

u 


N 




m 
O 
o 

m 




S 

3 


a 


|l 

^a 


Alexandria 


Brick ....' 


1875 


Freehold . . 


1^ acres 


2000 




1865 


14 


60 


Almonte 


Stone 


1875 


do 


1 " ... 


12000 


i 


1872 




1 


500 




Brick , .. 
do .... 
do .... 
do ... 


1875 
1875 
1850 
1857 


do 
do 
do 
do 


4 " .... 

3 "'.'.'.'. 
2 " .... 


8000 
4000 

4000 


1 


1865 
1872 


14 
20 
12 
12 


1 

1 
i 
1 


450 




400 


Barrie 


200 


Beamsville 


1 


1850 


225 


Belleville 


do .... 


1873 


do 


2 " .... 


30000 


1 


1849 


12 


2 


410 




do .... 
do .... 


1875 
1857 


do 
do 


? " :::: 


7000 
12000 


"i 


1855 
1857 


10 
60 


1 
6 


200 


Bowmanville 


1000 


Bradford 


do .... 


1875 


do 


2 " ... 


2500 




1852 


7 


2 




Brampton ...... 


do ... 


1877 


do 


5 " .... 


10000 




1857 


30 


2 


200 


Brantf ord 


do .... 


1874 


do 


a " 


20000 




1864 


35 


1 


1000 


Brighton 


do .... 


isuo 


do 


1 


3000 


1 


1861 


18 


1 


300 


Brockville 


Stone 


1852 


do 


i " .... 


2000 




1818 


14 


2 


300 


Caledonia . . . 


Brick .... 


1840 


do 


1 


8000 


1 


1853 


21 


2 


1000 


Campbellford 


Stone 


1858 


do 


1 " 


7000 


1 


1875 


10 


1 


300 


Carleton Place . . . 


do .... 


1872 


Rented .... 


i " 


2000 


1 


1853 


17 


1 


75 


Cavusra 


Brick .... 
do .... 


1872 
1856 


Freehold . . 
do 


1 " '.'.'.'. 


3000 
10000 




1859 
1857 


15 
25 


■■■4" 


100 


Chatham 


200 


Clinton 


do .... 
do .... 


1876 
1874 


do 
do 


3i 
1 •-•- 


5000 
5600 





1866 
1820 


12 
40 


2 

2 


1000 


Cobourg 


500 


Colbome 


do . .. 
do .... 


1859 
1874 


do 
do 


1 

1 " 


2000 
6000 


1 


1857 


15 
14 


1 
2 




Collingwood 

Cornwall 


200 


do .... 


1877 


do 


U " .... 


9500 




1809 


26 


1 


3.50 


Drummondville . . . 


R Cast . . . 


183.3 


do 


2 " ... 


4000 




1856 


25 


1 


250 


Dundas 


Brick ... 


18(32 


do 


■2i " ... 


10000 


1 


1855 


24 


2 


1500 


Dunnville 


Frame . . . 


1870 


do 


i " .... 


1800 




1869 


10 




263 


Elora 


Stone 

do 


1857 
1878 


Rented .... 
Freehold . . 


1 

2 " .... 


3000 
6000 


1 ' 


1849 
1860 


53 
14 


1 
1 




Farmersville 


1.50 




do . 
do .... 
do .... 


1878 
1853 
1859 


do 
do 
do 


1 " ... 
7 " .... 
\ " .... 


3500 

25000 

6000 


1 
"'i' 


1855 
1852 
1845 


15 
55 
14 


""% 


275 


Gait 


2000 


Gananoque 


500 


Goderich 


Brick ... 
Frame . . 


1875 
1859 


do 
do 


1 

T» ' •••• 


10000 
1500 




1841 
1857 


15 
10 


2 
2 


50€ 


Grimsby 


250 


Guelph 




1849 


do 


4 " .... 


5000 


i 


1841 


30 


1 


20c 


Hamilton 


do .... 


18ti6 


do 




20000 


1 




54 


4 


5000 


Hawkesbury 


Brick .... 


1873 


do 


2 "... 


llfiOO 


1 


1874 


32 


3 


40 


Ingersoll ....... 


do .... 


1873 


do 


2i 


10000 


1 


1853 


14 




1000 


Iroquois . . 


Stone 


1846 


do 


1 


4000 




1846 


20 


2 


200 


KemptviUe 


Brick .... 


1873 


do 


If 


8000 


1 1 

1 


1842 


34 


5 


1000 


Kincardine 


do .... 


1878 


do 


3 " .... 


4700 


1 


1858 


6 


1 


225 


Kingston 


Stone 


1876 


do 


1 " ... 


1200(1 




1791 


17 


3 


850 


Lindsay 


Brick ... 
Frame . . 


18!1 
1873 


do 
do 


15 " .. 
1 " .... 


10000 
1500 


i 


1857 
1873 


12 

20 


3 

1 


40C 


Listowel 


500 


London ... 


Brick .... 


1877 


do 


2\ " ... 


25000 


i 


1841 


15 


2 


2100 


Markham 


Frame . . 


1850 


do 


2 " .... 


1000 


.... 


1858 


15 


1 


200 


Mitchell 


Brick .... 


1872 


do 


h " ... 


4000 


.... 


1873 


20 


2 


176 



60 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



High Schools. 



INFORMATION. 



00 
ID 

w 

<D 

.s 

m 


-a 

<L> 

.S £ 


Number of pupils who passed In- 
termediate Examinations dur- 
the year. 


^ > 

•at) 


^3 
1) 
b< 

4) 
.^ 



-a 

0) 

il 

is 

;2i 


a) 

i 
li 


£ 




Ol 



■a.2 

Ol tH 

^ J) 

S:S 

3 




Ph 

Ol 

Ph 

■■ss 

a> c3 

i« 


<D 

"o 

c« 

<1) 

T3 

1 

S 

f^ TO 

S C 

!5 


Head Masters and theib 
Universities. 






10 

7 

12 

13 

5 
17 

23 

18 




■■■■2" 


1 

10 


■""3 


20 
12 

"io 


"'5 


2 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 
3 

3 
3 

2 
3 

7 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
3 
4 
4 
1 
6 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
2 

n 
t 

2 
3 
2 
4 
17 
3 
2 
2 

2 

2 
5 
2 
2 
6 

2 

2 






1 


P. C. McGregor, B.A. , Queen's. 
F. F. McNab,B.A., Queo^s. 
Alexander Steele, B.A., Tm-onto. 
H. B. Spotton, M.A., Toronto. 
W. D. Johnson, B.A., Toronto. 


"l 


2 

1 


2 
1 

1 
4 

4 
4 


3 

"2 
3 

2 


2 

17 


1 

1 

1 


17 

2 
2 


45 
20 


R. Dawson, B. A., Trinity, Dub- 
lin. 
J. W. Connor, B.A., Toronto. 
Wm. Oliver, B.A., Toronto. 


"i" 


14 

54 

3 

6 

7 

6 

9 

4 

7 

15 

18 

1 

41 

1 

1 

8 

6 

9 

6 

25 

20 

3 

23 

2 

10 

61 

1 

9 

3 

2 

5 

10 

7 

8 

33 

12 


2 
14 

"2 

* i 

1 

'"'1 
4 

16 
2 

4 
1 

.... 

"■3 

1 

3 

10 

'*"i' 

\ 

25 

1 
8 

"'i' 
1 


4 

10 
3 
2 
5 
3 
5 

6 
4 
1 

4 

"2 

"i 
2 

'""5 

■■■■2' 
4 

1 

8 
48 
9 
3 
5 
4 

1 



5 

4 


5 
20 


14 


9 

50 


C. Fessenden, B.A., Trinity. 
James Mills, M.A., Victoria. 
Robt K. Orr B A Toronto 


*"i 

'"i 
1 

1 

"*"i' 

1 
1 


"'.5' 

" 6 
4 
4 

2 

1 

11 

""i" 
2 

"'e' 

"2' 

2 

i 

16 

11 

4 

4 

2 

'"i 

""e 
2 


1 
10 

""3 

... 

"4 

2 
70 

1 

10 

8 

"■■4 

28 
3 
3 

26 
8 
3 


6' 
8 

20 
6 
4 

20 

"2' 


"360 


W. H. Law, B.A., M.D., Victoria. 
R. P. Echlin, B.A., Victoria. 
A. G. Knight, B.A., Victoria. 
A. B. Cooke, B.A., Trinity. 

C. W. Colter, A.B., Neiv Brunswick. 
David S. Paterson, B.A. , Toronto. 
James TurnbuU, B.A., Toronto. 

I). C. McHenry, M.A., Victoria. 
V. Switzer, B.A., Victoria. 
William Williams, B.A., Toronto. 
James Smith, A.M., Aberdeen. 
John M. Bell, B.A., Ghm/ow. 

D. C. Sullivan, LL.B., Toroiito. 
C. W. Harrison, B.A., Victoria. 
P. A. Switzer, M.A.. Victoria. 
A. Bo'.verman, M.A., Victoria. 

E. Poole, B.A., Bishop's, LennoxviUe. 
Wm. Tassie, M.A., LL.D., Toronto. 
Adam Johnston, B.A., Toronto. 
Hugh J. Strang, B.A., Toronto 
Wm. Cruickshank, A.M., Aberdeen. 
Wm. Tytler, B.A., To7-onto. 

Geo. Dickson, M.A., Victoria. 

W. C. Middleton, B.A., Toronto. 

W. K. Shortt, B.A., Trinitij, Dublin. 

W. A. Whitney, M. A., Victoria. 

W. M. Elliott, M. A., Victo- 
ria. 

Benjamin Freer, Certificate. 

Arch. P. Knight, M.A., Queen's 

Robert Dobson, Certificate. 

James Crozier. B. A., Toronto. 

Benjamin Bayly, B A., Trinity, 
Dublin. 

Edward T. Crowle, M.A., Giessen, 
Germany. 

0. J. Joll'iffe, B.A., Victoria. 


1 

""i 

1 

"*i 


* io' 


"ei" 


1 
1 
1 


5 

12 
100 

15 





1 


4 






1 

1 

i 
1 


9 
2 

"io" 

21 

1 

■ 12 


6 

7 
8 

'"is 

14 
6 


"26' 


1 


4 


2 


4 


2 



61 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 















TABLE H. 


—The 


MISCELLA]S'EOUS 












O 


1 'S 






'o 


1. 








•x; 


o 


§ 


<D 


o 




>i3 
















P< 


o 








6 




a 


1 


J3 


i 


O 




m 

c 


:2S 


High Schools. 


o 
o 




1 g 

o 


-6 

a 
p ■ 

2 

bo 


o 
o 

;> 


'3 

Si 


1 
1 


O 


en 

o 

3 


-3 " 






-; 


'o ; ft 




"^ 


J2, 


U 


fc< 






[o 




"3 
2 


a> 

M 


"g M 


O 




0) 

s 

3 


0) 

-a 
S 


II 

IS 




X\ 


^ 


Ph 


CD 


P^ 


m 


>H 


1 ^ 


^ 


w 












S 










% 


Morrisburgh 


Brick . . . 


1 1875 


Freehold . 


.\1^ acres.... 


10000 


1 


1865 


8 


2 


1 300 


Mount Forest .... 


R.cast... 


1 1877 


do 


. 3 " .... 


4000 




1878 


14 


1 


456 


Napanee 


Brick ... 


! 1872 


do 


3 " 


4500 


1 




23 


2 


1050 


Newburgh 


Stone . , . 


1854 


do 


Ah 


5000 


1 


1844 


18 


1 


500 


Newcastle 


Brick . . . 


18»iO 


do 


. 1 " ... 


6000 


1 


1860 


15 


1 


600 




do ... 
do ... 


1876 
1875 


do 
do 


.2 " . . . . 


7000 
4000 






30 
12 


1 
1 


200 


Niagara 




1808 


215 


Norwood . . 


do ... 


1858 


do 


1 " .... 


4000 


1 


1855 


12 


2 


240 


Oakville 


do ... 

do ... 

Frame . . 


18.52 
1875 
1860 


do 
do 
do 


1 ;; .... 


6000 
1400 
3000 


1 

"i' 


1854 
1864 
1860 


12 

4 

27 


2 


2000 






Omemee 


3 


500 


Orangeville 


Brick . . . 


1875 


do 


1^ " .... 


11100 




1865 


21 


1 


600 


Orillia 


do ... 

do ... 

Stone . . . 

do ... 


1876 
1865 
1874 
1859 


dd 
do 
do 
do 


3 " .... 

h 

3 " .... 

3 <l 

6 .... 


6100 
10000 
30000 
10000 




1 

"i" 


1877 
1866 
1843 
1857 


8 
20 
36 
35 


1 
1 
1 
2 


500 




200 


Ottawa 


2500 


Owen Sound 


1200 


Pakenbam 


Frame . . 


1874 


do 




800 


1 


1861 


20 


2 




Paris 


Brick . . . 


1857 


do 


1 " .... 




1 




27 


1 




Parkhill 


do ... 


1873 


Rented ... 


1 " .... 


65ro 


1 


1872 


9 


2 


2.50 


Pembroke 


do ... 


1876 


do ... 


li " .... 


2000 


1 


1860 


8 




50 


Perth 


do ... 


1876 


Freehold . 


5 " 


16000 


1 


1818 


15 


2 


500 


Peterborough 


do .... 


1857 


do 


2 " ... 


27400 


1 


1829 


22 


2 


2000 


Picton 


do .... 


1878 


do 


^ " 


65 




1846 


12 


2 


170 


Port Dover 


do .... 


1856 


do 


2 " .... 


2000 


1 


1856 


30 


2 


300 


Port Hope 


do .... 


1860 


do 


h " ■•• 


3000 




1856 


20 


2 




Port Perry 


do .... 


ls73 


do 


2 " .... 


14000 


1 


18i;8 


22 


2 


800 


Port Rowan 


do .... 


1874 


do 


2h •'.... 


6000 


1 


1866 


24 


2 


500 


Prescott 


Stone 


1877 


do 




2000 


1 


1850 


13 


3 


200 


Renfrew 


Brick . . . . 


1874 


do 


\-h " . . 


3500 


1 


18.-.9 


6 




120 


Richmond Hill . . . 


do ... 


1872 


do 


ii " .... 


3500 


1 


1850 


20 


i 


600 


Sarnia 


do .... 


1856 


do 


li " .... 


8000 


1 


1844 


16 


3 


1000 


Simcoe 


do ... 


18.58 


do 


12 " .... 


10000 


1 


1835 


24 


1 


500 


Smith's Falls 


Stone 


1871 


do 


h 


14000 


1 


1815 


15 


3 


500 


Smithville 


Frame . .. 


1860 


do 


1 " .... 


1500 




1860 


6 




175 


Stratford 


Brick . . . . 


1856 


do 


1 " .... 


7400 


i 


1.S53 


25 


2 


950 


Strathroy 


do .... 


1875 


do 


1 " ... 


4000 




1863 


20 




300 


Streetsville 


do ... 


1850 


do 


1 " .... 


3000 




1851 


9 


2 


400 


St. Catharines .... 


do .... 


1828 


do 


2 " .... 


18.500 




1828 


48 


1 


900 


St. Mary's 


do .... 


! 1874 


do 


2 " .... 


l-.'OOO 




1861 


13 


2 


12oO 


St. Thomas 


do ... 


i 1877 


do 


2 ' .... 


11000 


i 


1853 


23 


1 





Sydenham 


Stone .'. . . 


1 1872 


do 


1 " .... 


lOOOO' 




1873 


16 


1 


600 


Thorold 


Brick , . . . 


1875 


do 


2i " .... 


9000 




1860 


23 


1 


320 


Toronto 


do .... 
do .... 


1871 
1873 


do 
do 


2 " .... 
li " ... 


46000 
8000 




1807 
1852 


26 
16 


1 
1 


1760 


Trenton 


550 


Uxbridge 


do .... 


1 1373 


do 


2 " .... 


11000 




18^6 


16 


1 


300 


VankleekHilL... 


do .... 


1 1872 


do 


§ " -...i 


3000 




1857 


16 


2 


100 


"Vienna 


do .... 


i 1862 


do 


1 i " .... 


2700 




18.50 


23 


2 


600 


Walkerton 


do .... 


1875 


Rented 


24 


12000 




1872 


15 


1 


350 


Wardsville 


do .... 


1877 


Freehold . . 


U " .... 


4800 




1860 


10 




250 


Waterdown 


Stone 


18.54 


do 


3| " ....; 


5000 




1856 


16 


i 


400 


Welland 


Brick . . . . 


1878 


do 


!i " .... 


10000 




1856 


25 


2 


1000 


"Weston , 


do .... 


1875 


do 


If " ... 


4000 




1852 


25 

1 


1 


400 



62 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



High Schools. 



INFORMATION. 



.2 


>f 


^Sp 


h 


13 




S 





>> 


S 






r2 


4 

2 


<D to 




5 

0) 


c8 


'3 





ft 


1 

+3 






<» 


<B 


P,-^ 


o-S 




J3 


-u 


•2, 



^ 




TJ 








<» 
^ 

A 




M 2 







'ft-2 


P4 

.s 


c3 




Head Masters and their 


1 












"B-J 


, 3 


I1 


s 




Universities. 


.s 

01 . 






C *j 




^1 

S3 ft 


^ ft 




<V Hi 

^ ft 


J2 S, 




l2 


-la 


a a; s 
J3 -w — 


211 


c 

is 


p 




11 


3Q 


s 

3 


a 

4> 




m 


cc 


;2; 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


l^i 


^ 










7 


2 


1 




27 


23 






2 


Irwin Stuart. B.A., Queen's. 




1 






5 
3 


4 

4 


3 
3 


3 

25 






2 
3 


Joseph Eeid, B.A., Toronto. 
Eobt. Matheson, B.A. Toronto. 




9 




1 




6 
6 


1 














2 
2 


P. L. DorlaiKl, B.A., Alhert. 


1 


4 


2 


5 


3 




Jno. E. Wightman, M.A., Torotito. 






5 
3 




5 

6 


5 

1 


8 


1 
11 






2 

2 


J. Morrison, M.D., M.A. , Acadia. 


1 




A. Andrews, CertiUcate. 


1 




4 




4 


10 




3 






2 


Henry B. Houghton, B. A. , Dublin. 


1 


"i 


2 

6 

'""s' 






3 


6 

2 

13 








2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


N. J. Wellwood, B.A., Tm-onto. 


1 


1 




0. >T. Brown, M.A., Victoria. 


1 


6 


7 






John Shaw, Certifirate. 


1 






L. C. Smith, B.A., Tictoria. 






6 


6 


3 






Geo. B. Ward, B.A., 3fcGiU. 


1 




17 


1 


4 


4 


1 


21 






3 


W. W. Tamblvn, M.A., Toronto. 


1 




18 
32 


2 

1 














7 
4 


J. Thorburn, M.A., AIcGill. 




8 


10 


10 


30 




H. De La Matter, Certificate. 






6 

7 


1 


4 
4 


2 
3 










2 

2 


J. S. Jamieson, B.A., Victoria. 


1 


3 




. . . 


J. W. Acres, B.A., Trinity. 






4 


1 


3 
3 


"'3' 


1 
2 









2 

2 


E. M. Bigg, M.A. , Toronto. 





5 




A. McMurchy, B.A., Queen's. 






10 


2 


4 


7 


2 


20 






3 


F. L. Michell, B.A., Toronto. 


i 




31 


3 


6 


30 


2 


28 






6 


J. F. Jeffers, M.A., Toronto. 


1 




11 
10 
11 


■■4' 


4 
5 

4 


1 


6 
1 

2 








2 
2 
4 


J. A. Clarke, M.A., Victoria. 








Jas. Lumsden, M.A., Aberdeen. 






11 




A. Purslow, B.A., LL.B., Victoria. 






33 


6 


8 


10 


12 


18 






4 


D. McBride. B.A., Victoria. 






1 
5 




6 
2 


6 


8 

7 








2 

2 


A. Carlyle, B.A., Toronto. 


1 


4 




M. McPherson, M.A., Victoria. 






2 
11 


'""i' 


4 

1 






10 
3 






2 

2 


W. J. Gibson, B.A., Queen's. 
Thos. Carscadden, M.A., Toronto. 






4 








10 




7 


5 


13 


7 






2 


Wm. Sinclair, B.A., Toronto. 




1 


2 

1 


2 






3 
1 








2 

2 






2 




3 




W. Taylor Briggs, B.A., Trinity. 






3 




2 


3 


6 


7 






2 


T. H. Hooper, B.A., Victoria. 






9 




8 


7 


6 


15 






4 


C. J. MacGregor, M.A., Ten'cmto. 


1 




35 


3 







30 


10 






3 


D. A. McMichael, B.A., Toronto. 









2 






2 


3 






2 


Rev. W. S. Westney, M.A., Trinity. 






57 


3 


15 


24 


3 


78 






8 


Jno. Seath, B. A., Queen's, Ireland. 




J 


31 


9 


10 


10 


2 


10 






4 


J. E. Hodgson, B.A., Toronto. 






26 




42 


27 


2 


34 






4 


Jno. Millar, B.A., Toronto. 




1 


10 

1 

41 


1 




3 


2 


24 






2 
2 
9 


J. E. Burgess, M.A., Queen's. 
Andw. McCulloch, M.A., Queen's. 
A. Mac:Murchy, M.A., Toronto. 




8 


20 


10 


21 


37 


63 






3 




3 


3 


4 


7 






2 


H. M. Hicks, M.A., Toronto. 







8 


2 


3 


3 


5 


19 







2 


.Tno. J. Magee, B.A. , Toronto. 






2 







10 


12 


5 






2 


Jno. Ma.xwell, B.A., McGill. 






3 




3 


5 


2 


7 






2 


C. R. Gunne, B.A., Trinity. 






9 


2 


4 


3 


12 








2 


Arnoldus Miller, Certificate. 






















2 
2 






20 


1 


10 


25 


20 


io 


D. H. Hunter, B.A., Toronto. 









1 


3 


4 


8 


10 






2 


J. M. Dunn, B.A.,LL.D., Toronto. 






4 




5 


4 


1 








2 


Geo. Wallace, B.A., Trinity, Dublin 









63 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE H.— The 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

















'd 


















.^3 


Ti 


;: 




o 


o ® 








'V 








ai 




o 










<a 






S 


04 


o 


A 


h-S 


High chools. 


s 

t-, 




a 

u 

o 


a 

3 

o 


o 

o 




"2 


'o 
o 


a 

m 
ft 
e8 


n 

• <-» 


1-% 








c3 


be 


13 


M 


u 


g 


3 


'^Z, 




a 

o 


S 


^ 


>, 
=« 


t; aj 


'73 


1) 


1=5 


o 










'o 


o 

4) 




O 
O 




3 


-a 

3 


IS 




m 


p^ 


tc 


w 


CC 


>^ 


!^ 


;2i 


w 


Whitby 


Brick .... 


1873 


Freehold . . 


1 acres ... 


12000 




1843 


58 


2 


1650 


Williamstown 


do .... 


1860 


do 


1 "... 


3000 


1 


1842 


40 


1 


500 


Windsor 


do ... 

do ,. . 


18.55 
1849 


do 
do 


1 " 

1 " .... 


5000 
5000 


1 


1850 
1843 


14 
10 


1 
1 




Woodstock 


150 


Total for 1878 .... 












55 

57 




2068 
2003 


162 
159 




Total for 1877 .... 














Increase 






... ... 




— 






65 


3 




Decrease 










3 










1 















64. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



High Schools — Concluded. 



INFORMATION. 



s 

1 

a 

11 

xn 


-^ 
cS 

4) 

<i> 
u 


Number of pupils who passed In- 
termediate Examinations dur- 
ing the year. 


D 
o 

a >. 

O ^ 


a> 
<u 

13 

Ol 

o 

to 

'2, oj 

ft—' 

s s 

is 


1 
o . 

^% 

0) 


ca 
-a 
<o 
a 
"o 

o 
11 

3 c 


Number of pupils who left for 
other occupations. 


& 

ft 

<o 
u 

ft 
_g 

■ft 
ftci 

^ a 

|l 


u 

1 

2 

cS 

a 


Head Masters and their 
Universities. 


1 
1 


1 

1 
1 
1 


11 

1 
7 
7 


10 
2 


3 

"'io' 

2 


3 
3 


18 

"12' 

8 


20 
6 
5 




4 
2 
3 
3 


G. H. Robinson, M.A., Toronto. 
J. Y. Cameron, A.M., Queen's. 
A. Sinclair, M.A., Toronto. 
Geo. Strauchon, Edinburgh. 


5.5 
53 


89 
90 


iiso 

605 


183 
145 


445 
555 


417 
328 


633 
564 


961 

876 


495 

172 


298 
280 




2 


"i" 


525 


38 


lio 


89 


69 


85 


323 


18 

























05 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



•a^'Baia^ 



•a^'Btng^ 



■9l^K 



•31'BIM 



•I^^oX 



•ai'Btna^ 



"F^OX 



o 
o 
K 
o 

CO 

O 

w 



o 
o 

a 

o 

o 

o 

Jz; 
o 
cd 
o 

H 



•91'BH 



•{ij^ox 



•9|'Bra9jJ 



•apH 



•F*ox 



•apoiaj 



■aPK 



•F*oi 



H 



fH f-H 



GO 



Ph P^ 



^ 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 






•SSUI^S'BJJ 



•uoqSuippY 
pnB xouuafj 



•o'Euaijuoj^ 



•A^ajjua^ 



j^juuTjq; •81'Bi^ 



•spaerj; 



•9f[IAn9JJ[) 



•uo^aiJ-BQ 



•!t!)O0S8Jj; 



•SBpHtlQ 



•^nonuo!)g 



•Xjj'eSua^Q ■^I'^H 



■8['BUI9j; 



■moj. 



•aft; ma ^ 

•9{^ai9^ 
•9FH~ 



■aiBoigj 



n9ssn^ -giBj^f 



■9|13ni9^ 



'F^o^ 






•pu'BTnip^Bjj 



•pn^naAi 



•upouirj 



•:ju'BJa; 



mjOAV^uaTW 



•uo^i'BH 



•aooraig 



•paj 



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Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



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43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



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43 Yictoria 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



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Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



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43 Yictoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE J. — Statement No. 2. — The Free Public Libraries of Ontario. 



SUPPLIED BY THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



MONEYS. 



COUNTIES, 

(Including 

Incorporated Villages. 



Glengarry . 

Stormont 

Dundae 

Pj-escott 

Russell 

Carleton 

Grenville 

Leeds 

Lanark 

Renfrew 

Frontenac 

Addington 

Lennox 

Prince Edwacd . . 

Hastings 

Northumberland 
Durham . . . . 

Peterborough . . . 

Victoria 

Haliburton .... 

Ontario 

York 

Peel 

Simcoe 

Halton 

Wentworth 

Brant 

Lincoln 

Welland 

Haldimand 

Norfolk 

Oxford 

Waterloo 

Wellington 

Grey ... 

Perth 

Huron 

Bruce 

Middlesex 

Elgin 

Kent 

LamViton 

Essex - 

Districts 



Totals 



5:? S 



> C 



MS 






P5 



S o. 



5 00 



5 00 



77 93 
20 00 



35 00 
89 00 
29 00 
37 50 
156 70 



46 75 



77 93 
20 00 



10 00 



35 00 

89 00 

29 00 

37 50 

156 70 



46 75 



155 86 
40 00 



70 00 

178 00 

58 00 

75 00 

313 40 



93 50 



82 00 
102 54 



129 

111 

98 

146 



82 00 
102 54 



25 
874 
50"" 
00 

60 

87 



129 71 

111 82 

98 75 

146 00 



164 00 
205 08 



Total Counties and In- 
corporated Villages . . 

" Cities 

" Towns 



62 25 
20 874 
33 50" 
85 00 
12 60 
07 87 



259 42 
223 64 
197 50 
293 20 



40 25 
33 50 
85 70 
82 61 
30 00 
37 50 
99 25 



20 00 j 20 00 



1879 20i 



1879 20^ 



124 50 
41 75 
67 00 

170 00 
25 20 

135 74 



•S c. 

466 70 

601 22 

854 00 

1031 06 

846 37 

2147 02 

1097 00 

2009 86 

5822 24 

1920 46 

1800 51 

911 50 

880 80 

2144 23 

3693 40 

4910 26 

3006 09 

3393 56 

806 92 



80 50 

67 00 

171 40 

165 22 

60 00 

75 00 

198 50 



40 00 



3758 41 



828 384 i 
184 155 



Grand Totals. 



2891 74^ 



828 384 
184 154 



1656 77 
368 31 



6824 05 
10505 13 
4723 76 
5317 73 
3670 87 
3328 80 
3502 44 
2873 00 
2006 87 
3260 44 
1998 96 
5442 60 
2639 76 
6333 47 
4955 04 
3700 02 
7000 24 
2545 46 
5444 34 
4021 34 
4177 60 
426S 13 
1989 00 
214 30 



S c. 

466 70 

611 22 

854 00 

1031 06 

846 37 

2147 02 

1097 00 

2165 72 

5862 24 

1920 46 i 

1870 51 I 

1089 50 

938 80 

2219 23 

4006 80 

4910 26 

3099 59 

3393 56 

806 92 



a> CO . 

P 01 K 



6988 05 
10710 21 
472-: 76 
5577 15 
3894 51 
3526 30 
3795 64 
2873 00 
2131 37 
3302 19 
2065 96 
5612 60 
2664 96 
6469 21 
4955 04 
3780 52 
7067 24 
2716 86 
5609 56 
4081 34 I 
4252 60 
4466 63 
1989 00 I 
254 30 I 



139086 55 142844 96 



17217 99 
12697 36 



6 

5 

6 

5 

7 

21 

7 

28 

47 

26 

23 

16 

12 

30 

60 

38 

56 

27 

49 



42 
90 
55 
55 
34 
29 
40 
27 
25 
36 
29 
51 
24 
68 
54 
40 
64 
38 
67 
28 
41 
37 
12 
6 



1461 



a c3 

c "- 

H 



796 
1248 
1506 
1988 
1528 
4309 
2089 
3720 
10900 
3483 
2993 
1851 
2069 
3803 
7405 
9390 
5936 
7672 
3842 



11953 

18614 
8269 
9944 
5347 
6700 
5880 
4896 
3685 
5712 
3638 

11548 
4906 

11214 
8990 
6672 

12007 
4648 
9235 
6303 
7941 
5942 
3476 
346 



254394 



18874 76 
13005 67 



2891 74^ 5783 49 169001 90 



174785 39 



17 
60 



1538 



24086 
16451 



294931 



75 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



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80 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE L. — The Superannuated or Disabled Public School Teachers. 



NAME. 



•James Benton 

W. K. ThornhiU 

John Nowlan 

George Reynolds 

John Donald 

Angus IMcDonell 

James Forde 

Gideon Gibson 

Donald McDougall 

Thomas White 

Rev. Joshua Webster . . 

Norman McLeod 

William Glasford 

John Vert 

William Benson 

William Kearns ... . . 

James Leys 

Hector McRae 

Emily Cozens 

William Dennott 

Walter Hick 

Daniel Wing 

Isabella Kennedy 

Peter Fitzpatrick 

James Kehoe . . . 

James Mc(^iieen 

John Miskelly 

Nicholas Fagan 

Andrew Power , 

Catherine Snyder 

John Brown , 

John Monaghan 

Richard Youraans . . . . 
William Ferguson .... 
Daniel S. Sheehan .... 
Jeremiah O'Leary .... 
Archibald McCormick . 

James Bodfish 

E. Redmond 

William Hildyard 

Mary Richards 

W. 13. P. Williams . . . 

Julius Ansley 

Thomas Buchanan . . . 
Matthew M. Hutching 

Helen McLaren 

Rali)h McCallum 

John Dods 

P. G. Mulhern 

Thomas Sanders 

George Weston 

Robert ITamilton 

Joseph D. Thomson . . 
Henry Bartley 



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69 
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78 
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131 00 
92 00 
80 00 
134 00 



The pensions are subject to a deduction, before payment, of $4 for annual subscription, required by law 



81 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE L. — The Superannuated or Disabled Public School Teachers. 



No. 



200 
201 
202 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
214 
215 
216 
217 
218 
210 
221 
222 
228 
229 
231 
234 
235 
237 
238 
240 
241 
242 
245 
246 
247 
248 
251 
252 
253 
254 
258 
259 
261 
262 
263 
264 
265 
266 
267 
268 
269 
270 
271 
272 
273 
274 
275 
276 
278 
279 



NAME. 



Melinda Clarke 

James Brown 

Daniel Callaghan 

James Robinson 

Jane Tyndall 

WiUiam Bell 

William Brown 

James Armstrong . . . 
Caroline F. Mozier . . . . 

Eliza Barber 

James McFarlane 

James McKay 

J. C. Van Every 

Benjamin Woods 

John Younghusband . . 

William Irvine 

Kichard Campbell 

•James Mahon . 

John Douglass 

Daniel McGill 

Anna McKay 

Robert Jordan 

David Kee 

Thomas Dorothey 

Thomas \Miitfierd 

John Robinson 

Archibald C. Boyd . . . 

James Briggs 

John Graydon 

Charles Judge 

John Ross 

John Roberts 

Mary Crawford 

William Lewis 

John Russell 

George Wilson 

Benjamin Meeds 

J. A. G. Williamson . . . 
Thomas Howatson . . . 

Thomas McNeillie 

Alexander MeLeod . . . . 

William Moore 

Thomas C. Smyth 

George Wilkin 

Michael Gallagher 

Robert Futhey 

John McNaughton 

Alexander Mclntyre . 
Frederick Rimmington 

Hugh Duff _. 

James W. McBain 

John Quin 

Adam Robinson 

Mary Blount Thorn 

William Trenholm 

John Ferguson 

















•^ tS^ 




c 




















■*^ ^ C D 
















«^ =* 73 S 




^ 




y3 p £ 3 




r- 




■r5 - o o 




tJC 


§ 








a 


'5 S ^-^ 




c3 


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H 


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^4-1 


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i 




< 


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< 


< 






$ cts. 


S cts. 


68 


loi 


93 00 


89 00 


73 


27i 


165 00 


161 00 


81 


30 


180 00 


176 00 


63 


18 


108 00 


104 CO 


74 


21 


126 00 


122 00 


77 


11 


66 00 


62 00 


65 


13 


78 00 


74 00 


65 


25 


150 00 


146 00 


69 


27 


162 00 


158 00 


60 


18i 


111 00 


107 00 


72 


27 


162 00 


158 00 


68 


33 


198 CO 


194 00 


75 


20 


120 00 


116 00 


78 


29 


174 00 


170 00 


83 


33i 


201 00 


197 00 


80 


36 


216 00 


212 00 


78 


31 


186 00 


1S2 00 


68 


20 


120 00 


116 00 


83 


22 


132 00 


128 00 


73 


30 


180 00 


176 00 


75 


18 


108 00 


104 00 


83 


28 


168 00 


164 00 


63 


17 


102 00 


98 00 


67 


34 


204 00 


200 00 


69 


321 


195 00 


191 00 


77 


17 


102 00 


98 00 


53 


191 


117 00 


113 00 


67 


37 


222 00 


218 00 


74 


30 


180 00 


176 00 


6S 


17 


102 00 


98 00 


68 


22 


132 00 


128 00 


77 


16 


96 00 


92 00 


58 


15 


90 00 


172 00 


61 


22| 


135 00 


131 00 


73 


30 


180 00 


176 00 


79 


20 


120 00 


116 00 


69 


23% 


141 00 


137 00 


59 


17 


102 00 


98 00 


! 79 


10 


60 00 


56 00 


81 


161 


99 00 


95 00 


74 


48" 


288 00 


284 00 


58 


23 


138 00 


134 00 


75 


15 


90 00 


86 00 


70 


25 


150 00 


146 00 


61 


29 


174 00 


170 00 


72 


32 


192 00 


188 00 


59 


29 


174 00 


170 00 


59 


24 


144 00 


140 00 


46 


12 


72 00 


68 00 


65 


211 


129 00 


71 00 


45 


20 


120 00 


116 00 


57 


. 31 


186 00 


182 00 


72 


m 


99 no 


95 00 


55 


14 


84 00 


80 00 


61 


23 


138 00 


134 00 


47 


16 


96 00 


92 00 



82 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE L. — The Superannuaterl or Disabled Public School Teachers. 









_6 




d to the 
surer as 
from 1st 
nber. 








5 






No. 


NAME. 






_o 


" 5'2■e 








o 


(D 


^.cp^co 








c3 


Ph 


^%oS 








H 


"o 


opu a> ?|» 








o 


-g 










M 









ho 


S 


M 


2m =3 =« 






< 


>* 


< 


< 










§ cts. 


$ cts. 


280 




59 
44 


25 

99 


150 00 
132 00 


73 00 


282 


Ephraim Rosevear 


128 00 


283 




73 
72 
68 
50 
48 
61 
57 
69 
59 
66 
52 


21i 
16" 
29h 
13| 
16 
25 
22* 
16" 
8 
22 
184 


129 00 

96 00 

177 00 

81 00 

96 00 

150 00 

135 00 

96 00 

48 00 

132 00 

111 00 


125 00 


284 




92 00 


285 


Matthew D. Canfiekl 


173 00 


286 




77 00 


■'87 


William Curry .... ... 


92 00 


288 




146 00 


289 




131 60 


290 


William Thorn " 


92 00 


291 




44 00 


292 




128 00 


293 


Heiirv Buckland 


107 00 


295 


Jame.> Milner 


64 


324 


195 00 


191 00 


296 


Patience S. Courtney 


54 


17 


102 00 


98 00 


297 


William Armstrong 


67 


45 


270 00 


266 00 


298 


.Joseph D. Booth , 


53 


21 


126 00 


122 00 


299 


Michael Brennan 


68 


16 


96 00 


92 00 


300 


Henry Beuglet 


58 


21 


126 00 


122 00 


301 


Patrick Donovan 


66 


28 


168 00 


164 00 


302 


John Fraser 


77 


16 


96 00 


92 00 


303 


John Isi ister 


77 


15i 


93 00 


89 00 


304 


Barbara A. Irvine 


44 


22 


132 00 


128 00 


305 


Robert Marlin 


64 


26 


156 00 


152 00 


306 




66 
70 


20 

24 


120 00 
144 00 


116 00 


307 


Daniel McRae 


140 00 


308 


Timothy J. Newman 


62 


23 


155 00 


151 00 


310 




74 


18 


108 00 


104 00 


311 


James Scott 


63 


14 


84 00 


80 00 


312 


.James Simpson 


70 


10 


60 00 


56 00 


313 




45 
45 


17 
16 


102 00 
96 00 


98 00 


314 


James Cooke 


92 00 


315 




53 

51 
64 
66 
5(5 
36 
54 


19 
23 
18 
28 
24 
10 
23 


114 00 
138 00 
1C8 00 
168 00 
144 00 
60 00 
138 00 


110 00 


316 




134 00 


317 




104 00 


318 




164 00 


320 


Samuel J. Trew , 


140 00 


322 


.John Chapman 


56 00 


324 


James Elliott 


144 00 


.325 


Rebecca A. .Johnson .- 


44 


15 


90 00 


86 00 


326 


Luke D. Maxwell 


61 
50 


24 
14 


144 00 

84 00 


140 00 


329 


Francis Reynolds 


80 00 


332 




60 

88 


18 
28 


108 00 
168 00 


104 00 


333 


Matthew Elder 


164 00 


334 


William Gorman 


54 


26i 


1.59 00 


155 00 


335 


John T^awson 


72 


44^ 


204 00 


260 00 


336 


.Joseph Leighton 


70 
56 


2<5 


39 00 
156 00 


35 00 


337 


(xeorge Mctxill 


152 00 


338 




65 
62 


19 
13 


114 00 
78 00 


110 00 


339 


Dawson Reiil . 


74 00 


342 


William Gilmer . 


74 
68 


10 

27 


60 00 
162 00 


5() (K) 


344 


Elizal leth Greerson 


158 00 


345 


LeviT.Hvde * . 


42 


17 


116 00 


112 00 


346 


Alichael ^IcAuliffe 


68 


23 


13« 00 


134 00 


.'54.S 


Jacob Tvndall 


73 


20 


120 CO 


116 00 


349 


Charles F. Russell 


43 


19 


114 00 


110 00 



83 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE L. — The Superannuated or Disabled Public School Teachers. 




No. 



3.50 

351 

352 

353 

354 

355 

356 

358 

359 

362 

363 

364 

366 

368 

369 

370 

372 

373 

374 

375 

376 

377 

378 

379 

380 

381 

382 

383 

384 

385 

386 

387 

388. 

389 

.390 

391 

393 

394 

395 

396 

397 

399 

400 

403 

404 

405 

406 

407 

408 

409 

410 

411 

412 

413 

414 

415 



NAME. 



Robert H. Wickham. . 

William Watson 

William Bradlej^ 

John Bruce 

Benjamin Burkholder . 

Asahel B. Clark 

.James C. Clark 

Robert Graham ... . 

Henry Gi^er 

John S. Kingston . . . . 
A. B. C. McConnell... 

John McMahon 

William J. Ridley . . . . 
William R. Rodway . . 

Edward Rothwell 

Solomon P. Smith 

Daniel Sullivan 

Alexander Best 

Nathan Bicknell . 

Aexander Canning . . . . 

Jane S. Chad wick 

^Margaret Cozens 

William Earngey . . . 

.James Hodgson 

WUliam Johnston . . . . 

.James Joyce 

Elizabeth Murray 

John McAdam 

John ]SIcIntyre 

John Ovens 

John Paul 

John Beaton 

James Devlin 

John B. Diamond 

Henry Dugdale 

John Eraser 

James B. Hilton 

Joseph Hugill 

James KeUey 

Allan Kennedy 

.John Mitchell 

Alexander Rodgers . . 

J. G. RothweU 

E. G. Woodward .... 
John Bremner . . 
Anthony Elmlinger . 
Chi-istianna Hayes . . . . 
Patrick J. Moran 
John G. McGregor. . . . 
Andrew McKenzie . . . 

James Scott 

Adam S. Stephen . . . 
Matthew Wellhauser . 
Huldah L. Whitcomb 

John Blackley 

John Conn 



63 
60 
72 
70 
64 
42 
57 
68 
71 
66 
67 
40 
62 
67 
69 
64 
51 
59 
55 
63 
50 
68 
58 
67 
76 
73 
61 
58 
66 
63 
76 
67 
49 
48 
58 
71 
66 
68 
51 
77 
47 
55 
68 
48 
61 
66 
34 
55 
78 
68 
67 
63 
64 
53 
72 
54 





S cts. 


S cts 


33 


198 00 


374 00 


24 


147 50 


143 50 


28 


168 00 1 


164 00 


27 


162 00 


158 OO 


28| 


171 00 


167 00 


17 


117 50 


113 50 


26 


156 00 


1.52 00 


25 


150 00 


146 00 


26 


156 00 


152 00 


8i 


51 00 


47 00 


9 


.54 00 


50 00 


17 


102 00 


98 00 


20 


120 00 


116 00 


16 


96 00 


92 00 


40 


240 00 


236 00 


35 


210 00 


206 00 


221 


135 00 


131 00 


15 


90 00 


86 00 


13i 


81 00 


77 00 


14 


84 00 


80 00 


18i 


111 00 


107 00 


15 


90 00 


86 00 


16 


96 00 


92 00 


18 


126 00 


122 00 


18 


108 00 


104 00 


13 


78 00 


74 00 


24 


161 00 


157 00 


30 


180 00 


176 00 


14 


84 00 


80 00 


23 


1.38 00 


134 00 


14 


84 00 


80 00 


19 


114 00 


110 00 


25 


150 00 


146 00 


12 


72 00 


68 00 


25 


150 00 


130 00 


24 


144 00 


140 00 


30 


180 00 


176 00 


26 


156 00 


1.52 00 


28 


171 50 


167 50 


14 


81 00 


80 00 


19 


130 00 


126 00 


27 


162 00 


L58 00 


36 


216 00 


212 00 


19 


114 00 


110 00 


22 


132 00 


128 00 


24i 


147 00 


143 00 


12 


72 00 


136 00 


12i 


75 00 


71 00 


18 


126 00 


122 00 


10 


60 00 


.56 00 


24 


144 00 


140 00 


33 


198 00 


194 00 


21 


126 00 


122 00 


24 


160 00 


1.56 Ou 


29 


174 00 


170 00 


25| 


153 00 


149 00 



84 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE L.— The Superannuated or Disabled Public School Teachers. 












c S 2 t-' 
-» b c » 








o 




«c S 2 g 












43^ ^ OJ 








M 


c 


" '3 'S -v^ 


No. 


NAME. 
















C3 

1> 


^ 


^%s^ 








H 


c 










CB 


5 


C rJ C5 P 

^ 3 >--^ 








c3 
0) 


S 








< 


>* 


<\ 


< 










$ cts. 


$ Cts. 


4H3 


Arthur Hollis 


68 
45 
56 


11 

13 

27 


66 00 

78 00 

162 00 


62 0(. 


418 




74 00 


419 


William Kerr 


158 00 


420 




66 
63 


11 

27 


66 00 
183 00 


62 00 


421 




179 00 


422 


William McKerrow 


69 
72 
55 


18 , 

13i 

24h 


108 00 

81 00 

168 00 


104 00 


423 




77 00 


424 


John A. E. Thomson 


164 00 


425 




62 
63 
70 
62 


30" 

23 

27 


87 00 
180 00 
138 00 
162 00 


83 00 


426 




352 00 


427 




134 00 


428 


Jeremiah D. O'Sullivan 


158 00 


429 


Alexander Weldon 


72 
49 


20 
lU 


120 00 
69 00 


116 00 


430 


James Cavanagh , 


65 00 


431 


James De Cantillon 


52 


2H 


159 00 


155 00 


432 


William Davidson 


71 


161 


99 00 


95 00 


433 
434 




58 
62 


28 
24i 


168 00 
151 50 


164 00 


KliVnhpt.li Rni.Whis 


147 50 


435 J. W. Poole 


55 


241 


147 00 


143 00 


436 James C. Stewart 


62 


20 


120 00 


116 00 


437 William John Hull 


67 


30i 


183 00 


179 00 


438 




66 
65 


28 
35i 


168 00 
213 00 


164 00 


439 


James A. Thompson 


209 00 


440 




59 
56 


15i 
15i 


93 00 
93 00 


89 00 


441 


J ohn G. Boyd 


89 GO 


442 


Samuel Derby 


55 


22 


132 00 


128 00 


443 


Mathew U. Adams 


51 


22i 


135 00 


131 00 


444 


John McXamara 


50 


17 


102 00 


98 00 


445 


William Beattie 


50 


17 


102 00 


196 00 


446 




45 
62 


lU 
22" 


69 00 
132 00 


65 00 


447 


George W. Dulmage 


128 00 


448 


William Emerson 


74 


2 


12 00 


8 00 


449 


Hutrh Hamilton 


64 


224 


135 00 


131 00 


4.5il 




66 

76 


46^ 
12 


279 00 
72 00 


275 00 


451 


Alexander Stewart 


68 00 


452 1 William Ban- 


23 


4^ 


31 50 


27 00 


453 Parsons D. Henry . 


41 


17 


102 00 


98 00 


454 
455 


Adele B. Eochan 


58 
62 


m 

38i 


63 00 
231 00 


.59 (lO 


Bernard Dalv 


227 00 


456 :John Dunlop 


76 


isl 


111 00 


107 00 


457 


Patrick O'Brien , 


63 
61 


17 

2.) 


115 00 
169 00 


111 00 


458 


Richard W. Young, M. A 


165 00 


459 


Adolphus Andrews 


56 


21 


126 00 


122 00 


460 


Eichard H. Banks 


38 


14 


95 00 


91 00 


461 


William M. f "rews<m 


53 


21 


126 00 


122 00 


462 


William H. Meredith 


52 


23 


138 00 


134 00 


463 


Jeremiah \V. Palmer 


51 


19 


114 00 


110 00 


464 


William Millar 


80 


17 


102 00 


98 00 


465 


William Elmslie ... 


45 


17 


102 00 


98 00 


466 


Alexander Goulet , 


47 


20 


120 00 


116 00 


467 


John Ireland . . . . 


58 
42 


26 
17A 


156 00 
105 00 


152 00 


468 


Eohert Eussell 


101 00 


469 


Jaiiie.s Doyle 


73 


22 


132 00 


128 00 


470 


Horatio Mills 


65 


23 


i;;8 00 


134 00 


471 


Thomas Scott 


80 
Go 


12 

23i 


72 00 
141 00 


68 (10 


472 




137 00 









85 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE L. — -The Superannuated or Disabled Pul lie School Teachers. 



Xp. 



473 
474 
475 
476 
477 
478 
479 
480 
481 
482 
483 
484 
485 
486 
487 
488 
489 
490 
491 
492 
493 
494 
49o 
496 
497 
498 
499 
500 
501 
502 
503 
504 
505 
506 
507 
508 
509 
510 
511 
512 
513 
514 
515 
516 
517 
518 
519 
520 
521 
522 
523 
524 
525 
526 
527 



NAME. 



Hugh Crauley . . . 

Robei't Preston , 

Andrew Quinton 

William H. Griffin 

James B. Lynn 

Francis Kedslie 

Mary Jane Barry 

Charles F. H. INIetzdorf . 

James O'Meara 

Helen Cullen , 

Duncan McCoU 

Edward Rose , , 

Samuel Vandewater . . . . 

Thomas S. Agar . . 

John Coleman , 

Duncan Ferguson 

Alexander Hamilton . . , 

John Lindsay 

John G. McLaughlin . , 

Christopher J. Shaw 

Patrick Sullivan 

Henry Wilson 

James Bell 

Jeremiah O'Meara 

Robert Wiggins 

Thomas Dodds 

Elizabeth R. Mowat 

John R. Russell 

David Sloan 

William Campbell ..... 

Robert W. McKay 

Ai'chibald Thomson 

Mary A. Bell 

David Johnston 

Alexander Campbell ... 
Robert McClelland .... 

John INIackay 

James McGirr 

W. A. Pringle 

Peter Cameron 

Walter Renwick 

Thomas Armstrong . . . 

John Sinclair 

Philip D. Harty . 

Willliam Wilson 

Philip J. Shevlin 

Elizabeth Scott 

Eliza C. Brown 

A. D. Fordyce 

Thomas Kelly 

Rev. J. Kilgour 

J. C. Bateman 

John Brennan 

John Earl 

Robert McLean 



59 
54 
51 
61 
67 
61 
36 
46 
44 
46 
47 
55 
47 
70 
64 
60 
64 
72 
64 
65 
69 
73 
72 
78 
60 
34 
53 
31 
59 
63 
60 
65 
46 
50 
68 
53 
54 
48 
67 
55 
50 
58 
50 
65 
61 
63 
43 
58 
62 
65 
66 
52 
30 
69 
83 



22i 
19$ 
265 
26" 
32 
21 
13 
18 
19 
23 
174 
254 
17 
22i 
9" 
oil 

19| 

12" 

20 

28 

23 

20 

36i 

30" 

15 

6 
24 
104 

7 
16 
32 
22 
16 
18i 
12" 
33 
28 
25 
32 
12i 
21 
26 
23 
19i 
21 
29 
16 
21 
22 
24 
214 
144 

loi 

22 
114 



< 



S cts. 
135 00 
117 00 
159 00 
156 00 
192 00 
126 00 
78 00 
108 00 
114 00 
138 00 
105 00 

153 00 

116 50 
146 00 

54 00 
129 00 

117 00 

72 00 
120 00 
168 00 
138 00 
120 00 
284 .50 

180 on 

90 00 

36 00 

144 00 

73 50 
42 00 
96 00 

192 00 
132 00 

96 00 
111 00 

72 00 
204 50 
168 00 

155 00 
192 00 

75 00 
126 00 

156 00 
138 00 
117 00 
126 00 
174 00 

96 00 
126 00 

154 00 
144 00 
149 50 

87 00 

69 50 

132 00 

69 00 



86 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE L. — The Superannuated or Disabled Public Scliool Teachers. 





















J 
a 




3^ 55 -S 

^^: . 

O O ^ iL, 

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'S 


2^^|- 










c 








0) 

so 


C3 


3 


2m ?►! 






< 


^ 


< 


^ 










$ cts. 


$ cts. 


528 


Henrj' Selman 


77 


12i 


75 00 


73 50 


520 
580 




52 

58 


30 

25J 


180 00 
153 50 


152 00 


Alexander Forbes 


70 50 


531 


Hugh C. Henry 


57 


25 


150 00 


103 50 


5.S2 




55 


16 


96 00 


92 00 


533 




46 


20J 


123 00 


105 00 












41192 85 



In the above table, where the number is omitted, the pensioner is either dead, has resiimed teaching, or 
has ^\'itliilrawn. 

During 1878, .S1591.64 were returned to subscribers withdrawing from the Fund. 

The amount paid to new jjensioners for the first year is aflfectedjby the amount of arrears of subscrip- 
tions they have respectively paid in. 



87 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



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43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



•sasodand jijuonuoripg; 



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^;oc;i->*<»nco-*iMi>.Ttic<tTtco5m-<i<Trt~oo05t^i-iC5ooi>-(M 



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-jnd ^'Buoi^'Bonpg; oHT^^cE 
joj pa()uadxa qunotnu I'b^oj;, 




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qSijj joj papuadxa ^junoniy 



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{ooqog qSijj jo jaqranvj 



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poqog oi^qnj; jo jaqnin^ 



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LOiOifflcO'i'oooocjt^t^N.inoocst^rti-itoti^iHO 

r-l 1-1 iH i-i 1-1 iH (M 



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iCXiae<li-ieOlMi-l(Mi-IOtOCSOO'>*<<OIMllOlCtOtO'^<N35 
t^t^t~t-^^0D^»CCOtOi— IXt^i-IOC:tO-^Nt2t^(Min 
tH 1—1 1—1 1—1 1—1 1—1 I— I iH 1— I 1— I r-< C<I 



89 



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^ S c3 "r P^ X T" * -^ aJ oJ ^ T, E ^ t3 ^ 3 *^ .^ 



PhckW 



43 Yictoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



•sasodJTid ^'Bnoi'^^onpg; 



O 



K 



•papuadxann saou'Epeg 



•sasod 
-jnd puoi^Bonpa; oi^qnj 
JOJ papuadxa ^unoraB \v%oj^ 



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-'^v sjidnj JO jaqutnu l^^o^ 



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^ cc a: ;i tr; i^ -^ — %; v: — -^ cc t~ OQ X t~ i~ 1^ ;s X cc re o X 

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^^t^--rt~-^x--ic-. cc^c; --^ccr; X— -^rcoi-i i-txoo 

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iHt-HtH r-i tH t-I i-Hi-ii-Ji-l T-H 



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t^ © 1— n o 



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qgijj JOJ papuadxa ^junoxny 



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90 



43 Yictoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 





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91 



43 Yictoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



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92 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 




43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (Xo. 5.) 



A. 1880 





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43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (Xo. 5.) A. 1880 



IP-^^IRT XXX 



APPENDICES. 

1878. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF DR. MAY. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF THE DEPOSITORY BRANCH 

or THE 

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT, 



UPOX THE SUBJECT OF THE 



EXHIBIT OF THIS DEPARTMENT AT THE PARIS EXHIBITION, 

1 878. 



To the Honourable Donald Alexander Macdonald. Lieutenant-Governor of 

the Province of Ontario. 

May it Please your Honour, 

I herewith beg to submit a copy of the Report of Dr. May, Superintendent of the 
Depository Branch of the Education Department, upon the subject of the exhibit of this 
Department at the Paris Exhibition of 1878. 

Your Honour ^Yill be pleased to learn the gratifying facts connected with the success 
of the representation at this Exhibition which was open to all the nations of the world. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your Honour's most obedient servant. 



Educaticn" Department (Ontario), 
ToK NTo, 20th February, 1879. 



ADAM CROOKS, 

Minister of Education. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



Toronto, loth February. 1879. 
Dear Sir, — 

I have the honour to inform you that on examination of the List of Awards to 
British Exhibitors at tlie Paris Exposition, pubhshed by the Royal British Commission, 
I find that the Education Department of Ontario will receive more awards than England 
and all her other Colonies. 

Exhibits were sent to Paris from England, and the following British possessions: — 

England. Straits Settlements. 

Indian Empire. Mauritius. 

Canada. Seychelles. 

Jamaica. New South Wales. 

British Guiana. Victoria. 

Trinidad. Queensland. 

Lagos. Soixth Australia. 

Cape of Good Hope. Western Australia. 

Transvaal. New Zealand. 
Ceylon. 

The classification adopted by the French authorities included Education and 
Instruction, Apparatus, and processes of the Liberal Arts in the Second Group, which 
was subdivided into the following classes : 

Class 6. — Education of Children, Primary Instruction, Instruction of Adults. 

Class 7. — Organization and Apphances for Secondary Instruction. 

Class 8. — Organization, Methods and Appliarces for Superior Instruction. 

Class 9. — Printing Books, Libraries, &c. 

Class 10.- — Stationery. 

Class 11. — Drawing and Modelling. 

Class 12. — Photographic Apparatus, &c. 

Class 18. — Musical Instruments. 

Class 14. — Medicine, Hygiene and Public Relief. 

Class 15. — Z\Iathematical and Philosophical Instruments. 

Class 16. — Maps, Geographical Apparatus, &c. 



The Education Department of Ontario exhibited in classes 6, '7, 8, 9, and 16, and 
received an award in each class. 

The articles exhibited were ag follows : — 

1. Educational Reports, School Laws, Journal of Education, Printed Forms. 

2. Collection of Photographs of some of the principal Pubhc and High Schools in 
Ontario. 

3. School Method and Organization, Examination Papers. 

4. Text Books. 

5. Books relating to Teachers" Professional Library. 

6. Library and Prize books. 

7. Tablet Reading Lessons. 

8. Arithmetic and Geometry. 

9. Drawing. 

10. Maps aiid Charts. 

11. Natural History. 

12. Globes and Astronomical A^iparatus. 

98 - 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



13. School Apparatus, Pneumatics, Optics, Heat, Electricity, Voltaic Electricity, 
Magnetism, Mechanics, Hydrostatics, Hj^draulics, and Chemistry. 

The following awards were made to Ontario : — 

Class 6. — Diploma of Honour for Primary Instruction. A Gold Medal to Dr. 
Hodgins as Collahorateur. 

Class 7. — Diploma for Secondary Instruction. (High Schools). A Medal to Dr. 
May. 

Class 8. — Diploma for Universities. 

Class 9. — Diploma for Library and Prize System. 

Class 16. — Diploma for Maps. 

In addition a Diploma was awarded to the Honourable S. C. Wood, for the School 
of Agriculture, and Honourable Mention to Mr. Langmuir, for Prisons and Asylums. 

The awards made to England and her other Colonies were : 

Class 6. — England — London School Board, Diploma of Honour. Victoria — 
Education Department, Gold Medal. 

Class 8. — England — South Kensington Museum, Diploma of Honour. New Zea- 
land^Government of New Zealand, Silver Medal. 

In addition to the Awards made to Ontario, the following decorations of the Order 
of the Palm Leaf, were conferred : — 

Honourable Adam Crooks Officer of Public Instruction. 

Eeverend Dr. Eyerson do 

Dr. Hodgins do 

Dr. May Officer of Academy. 

Academic honours were not conferred on representatives of England or her other 
Colonies, and only two of these decorations were given to the United States. 

Our Department may feel justly proud of these decorations, which are only given 
for literary, scientific, or artistic merit. In answer to a written inquiry I sent to the 
Baron de Waterville, Director of Science and Literature, he informed me that these decora- 
tions are conferred after a minute examination, upon those who liave rendered real services 
to science, literature and fine arts, and are worn with a just pride by the most illustrious 
members of the Institute of France. In the same manner as the Emperor Napoleon I. 
replaced the ancient order of St. Louis, by the Cross of the Legion of Honour, he also 
replaced the ancient order of St. Michael, by the Palm Leaves. At its origin the reci- 
pients were compelled by statute to wear the palm leaves embroidered on the coat, but 
a recent decree permits them to wear the insignia attached to a purple ribbon. 

The decorations were presented for actual benefit derived by the French from the 
excellence of our school system. M. Bouisset, reporter of class 6, informed me that the 
City of Paris is now founding a Museum on the same plan, and in imitation of the 
Museum of the Education Department of Ontario. M. Bouisset visited our Department 
after the Philadelphia Exhibition, and compiled an elaborate report on his return to 
Paris, on Educational Museums. 

It is the more gratifying in referring to these awards and honours taken by the 
Department, for me to be able to state that only a very small sum has been expended 
by the Department in this great work. The Province of Quebec, at a great expense, 
had a special representative, and the United S'ntes had two, with extra clerks, in Paris 
during the whole Exhibition. In consequence ot my position, as Secretary to the Com- 
mission, our Department was saved similar expenses. 

The actual amount expended in Paris for installation, including Map Mounting and 
Frame3 for Photographs, was about $450. In addition to this about $800 was ex- 

99 



43 Yictoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



pended for Bookbinding and Printing. These expenses do not include the articles 
furnished from our Depository and Museum. 

Full sets of bound Educational Eeports, Journal of Education, and Examination 
Papers, were presented to Public Libraries, in different countries. There are still several 
sets at the disposal of the Department, left in charge at the South Kensington Museum. 

The Books were considered invaluable exponents of our School System, and were 
much prized ; but the greatest amount of good was done by the small pamphlet on the 
Educational Institutions of the Province of Ontario, prepared by the Minister of Educa- 
tion, for gratuitous distribution to visitors. 

In addition to a large edition sent from Canada, a translation was made in Paris, 
and 4,000 copies printed. These Eeports, with the explanation given of our Depart- 
ment and its working, gave the public a better idea of our country than even the 
exhibits themselves. The remarks made by the visitors were very gratifying, and gave 
rise to frequent inquiries respecting our commerce, immigration, and industries. The 
collection of Acts relating to Municipal matters, and the Eevised Statutes sent for dis- 
tribution b,y the Honourable Mr. Mowat, were of great assistance in explaining to them 
the general principles of the Canadian Constitutions, and local systems of self-govern- 
ment, and will no doubt be used as reference for years to come, by intending emigrants 
to this country. 

His Eoyal Highness the Prince of AVales, and the Prince of Denmark, expressed 
tliemselves as being much pleased with our Educational exhibit. 

The Duke of Manchester also called several times, and brought distinguished visitors 
to examine our exhibit. Sir Charles Eeed, on several occasions stated that were it not 
for Ontario, Great Britain and her Colonies would not have been properly represented. 
At a lecture on the Colonies, given at the Eoyal Colonial Institute (London), by the 
Secretary, Mr. Young, he referred to the shrewd energy of our people, which he attri- 
buted to our educating system, and said, " A key to one of the principal causes of their 
successful progress in the development of industrial art, is probably to be found in their 
excellent and superior educational system. Evidences of this were shown in the re- 
markable exhibition of school books, maps, furniture, and accessories made by the 
Dominion, and most esj)ecially by the Province of Ontario." 

These remarks are the more gratifying, and the awards more valuable, when we 
compare the size of our exhibit with those of other countries. 

The educational exhibits of France occupied more space than all the combined com- 
mercial and other exhibits of England and her colonies. Belgium, too, erected an immense 
building, for the display of her school work in the different grades. Several other coun- 
tries also had large educational exhibits, but no Educational Department that exhibited 
received a larger share of honours and awards than the Educational Department of 
Ontario. 

The articles exhibited (value about $3,000), chiefly of Canadian manufacture, were 
taken from the stock in the Educational Museum and Depository. With the exception 
of a few charts, exchanged in Paris, the Prize and Library books, and some foreign 
goods returned to Toronto, the collection is now at the South Kensington Museum, being 
left there provisionally for the contemplated Colonial Museum. 

Trusting that you will be satisfied with the result of my labours, faithfully carried 
out from your instructions. 

I have the honour to be, dear Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) S. P. May. 



APPENDIX B. 

Eeport and Suggestions with kespect to the Collegiate Institutes and High ScHOOiiS 
OF Ontario, for the year 1873, by the Inspectors of High Schools. 

Sir, — Having from time to time submitted detailed special reports on the schools 

100 



[ 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



I 



ADDEXDUM No, I.-COMPARATIVE TABLE FOR 1877 AND 1878, SHOWING THE PROGRESS OR DECLINE OF EACH HIGH SCHOOL 



35! 



J371 J 10191 






43 Yictoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



APPENDIX C. 

Annual Eeport of the Honourable the Minister of Education on County Model 

Schools, for the Year 1878. 

Toronto, 19th February, 1879. 

To the Honourable Donald Alexander Macdonald, Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of 

Ontario. 

May it please Your Honour : — 

I beg herewith to submit my report on County Model Schools for the year 1878. 

From the accompanying report tome of the sub-Committee of Examiners it will 
appear that these schools, numbering fifty, continue to show a gratifying success in the 
work of giving professional training to the Candidates for County or Third-Class Certifi- 
cates, and that the number so trained in 1878 quite equals the ordinary annual demand 
for a new supply, in the different Counties of the Province, of such a class of Teachers. 
The number of teachers who attended in the two terms of the year was 1,391, being an 
increase over last year of 154, the number of males being 719, and females 672, of whom 
1,339 successfully passed the examination in professional subjects. 

The economy of this local system cf furnishing professional training of Student 
Teachers is clearlj'^ apparent when it is considered that the expenditure entailed upon 
the Province is only $3.81 per student, or $7.62 in cases where County Councils give an 
equal amount. 

I have the honour to be 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

Adam Crooks. 



Eeport of Sub-committee on Model Schools, 1878. 

To the Rev. George Paxton Young, M.A., Chairman of the Central Committee of Ea>- 
aminers for the Province of Ontario. 

Sir,— Your Sub-Committee in charge of the County Model Schools, for training 
Teachers, beg leave to present herewith their annual detailed report of the attendance of 
teachers, accommodation provided, and such other matters as are required by regu- 
lations of the Educational Department, of which the following is a brief summary : 

Number of Model Schools in operation 50 

Of those in operation last year, closed* 1 

Attendance. 

Number of Teachers in Training, first term 1006 

Increase over last year . , 113 

Males 517 

Females 489 

* Owing to some misunderstanding between the County Council and Public School Board of Trustees, 
Peterboro' Model School was not opened for the Training of Teachers. 

104 



43 Yictoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



Number in attendance second term 385 

Increase over last year 41 

Males 202 

Females 183 



Total attendance both terms 1391 

Increase over last year 154 

Number of Males in attendance (1877) 558 

(1878) 719 

Increase 161 

Number of Females in attendance (1877) 679 

(1878) 672 

Decrease 7 

Lecture Course. 

Number of Lectures on Education, including methods of teaching .... 1826 

Increase 103 

Number of Lectures on Hygiene 501 

Increase 46 

Number of Lectures on School Law 421 

Increase 23 

Number of Lessons in Mental Arithmetic 1386 

Increase , 215 

Number of Lessons in Beading 1299 

Increase , •. 109 

Total number of Lectures and Lessons 543 

Increase 493 

Pkacticax, Teaching. 

Number of Classes taught by Teachers in training, 1st Term 1124 

" " " 2nd Term 654 

Highest number of Classes taught in any School 70 

Lowest " " 10 

Average number of Classes taught, 1st Term 22 

" " 2nd Term 21 

Standing of Teachers in Training. 

Number reported by Principal in final Report as 1st rate 316 

2nd " 502 

3rd " 385 

" " 4th '' 131 

" " 5th '- 36 

" " 6th "■ 2 

Number rejected by Board of Examiners 52 

AeCOMMODATION AND StAFF. 

Number of Model Schools that have complied fully with the regulations 27 

Increase 8 

Number with Principals holding a First- class Provincial Certficate .... 40 

Increase 4 

Number with duly qualified Assistants 41 

Increase 8 

Number with required room accommodation 35 

105 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



Your Sub- Committee has to report that each Model School, with two or three excep- 
tions, was visited twice during the hist half-year. Tiie mode of conducting the inspection 
was mucii the same as reported last year. lu every instance it was our aim to give a 
practical direction to the instruction of the Principal, and to impress upon tue Teachers 
in training the necessity of progress in the art of teachini/. We are pleased to inform 
you that Principals, Public School Inspectors, and the students themselves appear to be 
in sympatiiy with the whole scheme for craiuing teachers, and apparently anxious to 
make it successful. Trustees have in a few instances expressed their fear that the Model 
School would encroach too much upon the Principal's time, and interfere with the suc- 
cess of the Public Schools. 

Additionai, Eoom. 

The additional room required by the Regulations is provided in only thirty-five (35) 
schools. The crowded state of the Public Schools in nearly all the cities and towns ren- 
ders it almost impossible to place a room at the disposal of the Principal for Model 
School purposes without incurring considerable expense. While it is very desirable 
that this Regulation should be complied with, we find that, however, by the dismissal 
of a junior form the difficulty was at least partially overcome, and the Model School 
students tolerably well accommodated during the Principal's lecture hour. 

Model School Staff. 

There are now forty Model Schools with a Principal holding the requisite First- Class 
Provincial Certificate. This is atn increase of four over last year. There are also forty- 
one with properly trained assistants, being an increase of eight over last year. It is with 
great pleasure we bear testimony to the ability and earnestness with which they discharge 
their duties, and the readiness with which they received such suggestions as we found 
necessary to offer in regard to their work. 

Suggestions feoji Principals. 

From Reports made to your Sub-Committee the following points are elicited : — 

(1.) Universal satisfaction with the Model School scheme, and a generous apprecia- 
tion of its success. 

(2.) That the great want of young teachers is jjractice in teaching, more than literary 
culture. 

(3.) That Principals, owing to the demands upon their time by their own regular 
work, are unable to give that attention to the supervision of the teachers in training 
which is desirable. 

(■i.) That the lengthening of the term would be an advantage. 

(o.) That the appropriation from the County Councils should be a certainty. 

(6.) That Trustees are, in a few instances, still alarmed lest the Model School should 
damage the Public School. 

(7.) That the Lecture course should not be extended. 

Teachers in Training. 

The deportment of the Teachers in training, so far as known to your Sub-Committee, 
was highly satisfactory. With the exception of an occasional "late," there appears to be 
no irregularity worthy of notice. The rules imposed by the Principals have been cheer- 
fully complied with, and no cases of suspension or expulsion have been reported to us. 
The anxiety of the students to profit by their attendance at the Model School has frequently 
been referred to by those in charge of them, in the most commendatory terms. 

106 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



Lectuke Work. 

Besides the ordinary Lecture work of the Principals, much valuable assistance was 
rendered by Public School Inspectors, members of the medical profession and others, 
either in supplementing the prescribed Lecture course, or in taking up in full some special 
department. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

GEORGE W. ROSS, 
Chairman Sub-Committee on Model Schools. 



107 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 




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43 Yictoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



TABLE C. 

Statement shewing the assistance rendered Principals of Model Schools in the 
WAY OF Lectures, by County Inspectors and others. 

Brockville — W. R. Bigg, County Inspector, lectured on School Law. 

Bradford — Dr. Morton lectured on Hygiene. 

Chatham— E. B. Harrison, County Inspector, two lectures. 

Clinton — G. A. Dewar, County Inspector, lectured on School Law. 

Caledonia — Dr. Forbes lectured on Hygiene. 

Durham — Dr. Gun do. do. 

Goderich — H. J. Strange, B.A., lectured on History and Grammar. 

(j^alt — Mr. Lenton, P. S. Teacher, one lecture on How to Teach Writing. 

Hamilton- — A. Macallum, M.A., LL.B., lectured on Hygiene. 

Ingersoll — First Assistant, P. S. taught Reading. 

Kingston — Dr. Dupin, six lectures on Hygiene. 

Mount Forest — Dr. Yeomans lectured on Hygiene. 

Madoc — W. Mackintosh, County Inspector, lectured on Methods of Teaching. 

Milton — R. Little, County Inspector, one lecture. 

Morrisbury — Mr. Green, Assistant P. S., two lectures. 

Napanee — Mr. Matheson, M.A., High School, two lectures on Reading. 

Mr. Burrows, County Inspector, four lectures on School Law. 
Port Perry — Mr. Clark, Teacher, P. S., lectured on Reading and Hygiene. 
Picton — County Inspector, one lecture. 
Perth — do. do. two lectures. 

Head Master, H S., one lecture. 

Assistant, High School, one lecture. 
St. Thomas — Mr. Miller, Principal, High School, two lectures. 
Strathroy — J. S. Carson, County Inspector, several lectures on Methods of Teaching and 

Writing. 
Simcoe — Mr. Courtlandt lectured on Hygiene. 
/St. Catharines — Mr. Somerset, County Inspector, lectured on School Law. 

Dr. Campbell lectured on Hygiene. 
Windsor — Each of the County Inspectors gave several lectures. 
Walkerton — Rev. Dr. Bell, five lectures on Hygiene. 
Woodstock — Mr. Carlyle, County Inspector, gave several lectures. 
Welland — Dr. Glasgow, two lectures on Hygiene. 
Yorkville — County Inspector, one lecture on School Law. 



TABLE D. 

statement shewing the most common deficiencies of teachers in tpaining. 

A. Morton, Brampton, says : — Power to criticize and economize time. 

J. Suddaby, Berlin, says : — Faulty pronunciation, reading bad. 

J. Irwin, Belleville, says : — Lack of self-confidence. 

Chas. Clarkson, Brockville, says : — A total want of power to think independently. la- 
capable of applying a principle. 

W. Wilkinson, M.A., Brantlord, says: — Ability to teach. Want of energy. 

T. Wood, Bradford, says : — Lack of energy and watchfulness. 

W. B. Harvey, Barrie, says : — Want of order and method. 

D. Johnson, Chatham, says : — Progress, watchfulness, mode of receiving answers. 
Power of giving explanation. Thoroughness. 

D. M. Malloch, CUuton, says: — Correct pronunciation, grammar, accuracy. 

T. Hishop, Caledonia, says : — Want of energy and care in teaching. 

W. E. Sprague, Cobourg, says: — Energy, firmness. 

G. Milden, Cornwall, says: — Mental culture, non-attention and reading. 

R. N. Cump, Durham, says : — Energy, order and manner. 

112 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



J. C. Eowat, Farmer sville, says : — Lack of energy and thoroughness. 

W. E. Miller, Goderich, says : — Ability to economize time and secure improvement. 

E. Alexander, Gait, says : — Want of energy. 

George W. Johnson, Hamilton, says : — Order, energy, method. 

J. S. Deacon, Ingersoll, says : — Lack of watchfulness. Lack of tact in dealing with pupils. 

F. C. Powell, Kincardine, says : — Lack of energy and explanation. 

W.J. Summerby, Kingston, says: — Awkwardness, superficial knowledge of literary course. 
W. J. Carson, London, says : — Aptitude to teach far below the standard. 

J. H. McFaul, Lindsay, says : 

S. B. Westervelt, Mount Forest, says : — Questioning so as to interest the class and 

thoroughness. 
S. Curtis, Madoc, says : — Want of energy, of impreasiveness, of culture. 

C. McLean, Milton, says : — Diffidence and awkwardness. 

W. Alford, Morrisburg, says : — System, method, thorough preparation of lessons. 

A. Kennedy, Martintown, says : — 

W. Eannie, Newmarket, says : — ^ Ability to maintain discipline. 

A. C. Osborne, Napanee, says : — Poor government, bad reading and pronunciation. 

J. A. Greig, Owen Sound, says : — Want of power to sustain attention ; lack of energy 

and power of control. 
J. A. Duncan, Ottawa, says: — Want of originality, defective questioning. 
A. M. Eay, Port Perry, says : — W^ant of power to fasten the interest. 

D. J. Goggin, Port Hope, says : — Mental arithmetic and pronunciation. 
N. Gordon, Picton, says: — Spelling, arithmetic, reading. 

J. S. Atkinson, M.D., Prescott, says : — Want of home preparation of lesson ; want of 

energy. 
J. Eaine, Perth, says : — Want of energy. 
A. Wark, Sarnia, says : — Inaccuracy, I believe (in many cases) the result of careless 

preparation of lesson. 
N. M. Campbell, St. Thomas, says : — Lack of energy. 

E. Shepherd, Strathroy, says : — Energy, theory and thoroughness. 

H. Dickenson, Stratford, says : — Bad pronunciation and inability to sustain attention. 

G. Grant, B.A., Simcoe, says : — Energy, order, and push. 
J. B. Grey, St. Catharines, says : — Keeping order. 

H. Gray, Vankleek Hill, says : — Lack of method, and tardiness. 

J. Brown, Whitby, says : — Diffidence and want of simplicity. 

J. Duncan, Windsor, says : — Energy and tact. 

J. Boag, Walkerton, s&js : — Want of confidence in themselves. 

J. E. Dennis, Woodstock, says: — Lack of preparation, and hesitancy. 

E. Grant, Welland, says : — Inability to secure attention. 

W. J. Hendry, Yorkville, says : — Lack of interest in pupils' welfare. 



TABLE E. 

Have you any suggestions to offer with the view of securing greater efficiency in the 
future management of County Model Schools generally ? 

A. Morton, Brampton, says : — To place them under the Inspector's management. 

J. Suddaby, Berlin, says : — It is extremely necessary that the Principal be relieved from 
charge of classes of children. 

John Irwin, Belleville, says: — Candidates should have more practice in teaching, and 
Head Masters should be able to devote all their time to observing and criticising same. 

Wm. Wilkinson, M.A. , Brantford, says : — A longer term, lectures on science of teaching, 
drill and calisthenics, and larger remuneration. 

F. W^ood, Bradford, says :— Increased grant from Government or County Council. 

p. M. Malloch, Clinton, says : — Works of reference, and Professional Library to be sup- 
plied by the Education Department. 

113 



43 Victoria. - Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



W. E. Sprague, Cobourg, says : — The sessions are too short to do efficiently the work 

prescribed. 
George Milden, Cornwall, says : — Accommodation, assistance, qualified Head Masters, 

and term lengthened. 

E. N. Cump, Durham, says: — (1) The Model School sessions are too short; (2) No 

more than 15 Teachers in training should be admitted to any school in one session ; 
(3) Every Principal should hold a first-class certificate. 

.J. S. Eowat, Farmersville, says : — That the Government, assisted by the Counties, in- 
crease the bonus to Model Schools to at least $400.00, so that an extra teacher 
could be engaged during the Model School term, the Principal devoting the whole 
of his time to the Teachers in training. 

W. E. MiUer, Goderich, says : — -The Principal should devote his whole time to the train- 
ing and supervision of Model students. This will necessitate increased grants. 

G. W. Johnston, Hamilton, says: — A longer term — say three months. Certificate to 
show standing of teacher at County Model Schools. 

J. S. Deacon, Ingersoll, says : — I am not in favour of much change at present. 

F. C. Powell, Kincardine, says : — Longer session and better assistants. 

W. J. Summerby, Kingston, says : — The Principal should not have charge of a class of 
children. 

W. J. Carson, London, says : — Good Principals and assistants of standing and experi- 
ence. A longer session — say 12 weeks. Examination j)apers to be prepared by 
Central Committee. County grant compulsory. 

G. B. Westervelt, Mount Forest, says : — Principal should be lelieved of more of his 

Public School during Model School term. Eeading and mental arithmetic should 
be placed on non-professional course. 

P. McLean, Milton, says : — (1) That County Councils and Government should bear all 
the extra expenses incurred on account of Model School. (2) The Government 
grant should be the same for one session as for two, as the expenses are just the same. 

S. W. Alford, ]\rorrisburg, says : — Too much work for allotted time. Public School Law 
and Mental Arithmetic in non -professional course. 

Wm. Eannie, Newmarket, says: — Don't add any more subjects. 

A. C. Osborne, Napanee, says : — Place Hygiene and School Law among literary acquire- 
ments. Lengthen term to three months, and practice drill together. 

John A. Greig, Owen Sound, says : — If the term would be lengthened Music and Drill 
could be taught. 

J. A. Duncan, Ottawa, says : — Professional examinations mostly written ; papers to be 
prepared by Central Committee. 

Alex. M. Eay, Port Perry, says : — Uniform written examinations in addition to oral. 

D. J. Goggin, Port Hope, says :— Longer sessions, professional training alone, and uni- 

form examinations as for literary certificates. 

N. Gordon, Picton, says : — Think there should be a session immediately after New 
Year's, to accommodate Intermediate Candidates who passed at December Exami- 
nation. 

J. S. Atkinson, M.D., Prescott, says: — Increase grants so that an assistant could be 
employed to relieve Principal during Model School Term. 

A. Wark, Sarnia, says : — Students have not sufficient practice in teaching. Either make 
the term longer or the classes smaller, so that each teacher may teach at least twenty 
times. This cannot be done with a class of twenty-five without injury to the school. 

N. M. Campbell, St. Thomas, says : — That the Model School be entirely separated from 
the High School. 

E, Shepherd, Strathroy, says : — (1) That length of term be increased. (2) That furnish- 

ing the additional room become obligatory. (3) That the Head Master have more 
time personally to see the students teaching. 
H. Dickenson, Stratford, says: — (1) Panctuahty column on report. (2) Government aid 
for libraries. (3) Curtail numbers. (4) Adherence to standard for Principals. (5) 
Supply of fresh marking sheets. (6) Head Master should be ex officio member of 
County Board of Examiners. (7) Professional examination papers set by Central 

114 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



E 



Committee. (8) Compulsory grants from County Council, the grants to form part 

of Head Master's salary, to be supplemented by School Board. (9) Grouping of 

counties would be an improvement, as in time it will be said that schools are sadly 

interfered with. 
Shepherd, Strathroy, says: — Eelieve Principal of a portion of Public School work 

during Model School term. Lengthen the session. 
James B. Grrey, St. Catharines, says : — The County Inspector's duties should be more 

clearly defined in the regulations. 
Henry Gray, Vankleek Hill, says :— The amount appropriated by Government to aid 

Model Schools should be increased. 
James Brown, Whitby, says: — Less lecturing and more critical work. 
James Duncan, Windsor, says : — The term should be leugthened. The books (all of 

them) should be changed. There should be less of the " literary " and more of the 

" professional " in the Model School work and examination. 
Joseph Boag, Walkerton, says : — The session is not long enough. Twenty-five students 

should not attend at the same time ; the number should not exceed sixteen. 
James E. Dennis, Woodstock, says : — Lengthening of term for giving greater number of 

lectures. 
Eobert Grant, Welland, says : — I would suggest that Government grant be increased, 

that County grant be made compulsory, and that the term be made three months. 
Wm. J. Hendry, Yorkville, says : — (1) It would be better were the Principals of Model 

Schools not tied to a single division, but free to teach in any and every division. 

(2) The maximum number attending is too high, sixteen would be better. 



Statement showing the Model Schools that have been granted or refused aid by the 
County Council at the date of our Eeport. 



Brampton 

Barrie 

Berlin 

Belleville 

Brockville 

Brantford 

Bradford 

Chatham 

Clinton 

Caledonia 

Cobourg 

Cornwall 

Durham 

Farmersville . 

Goderich 

Gait 

Hamilton 

IngersoU 

Kincardine ... 

Kingston 

London 

Lindsay 

Mount Forest 

Madoc 

Milton 

Morrisburg . . . . 



No report 

$100 

No report 

$100 

Eefused 

No report 

$100 

$50 

$100 

No report 

$100 

Eefused 

$100 expected 

$100 

$100 

$50 

No report 

$100 

$100 

No report 

$100 

$500 

$100 

$150 

$200 

$100 



Martintown 

Newmarket 

Napanee 

Owen Sound 

Ottawa 

Port Perry 

Port Hope 

Peterborough 

Picton 

Prescott 

Perth 

Eenfrew 

Sarnia 

St. Thomas 

Strathroy 

Stratford 

Simcoe 

St. Catharines 

Vankleek Hill $100 

Whitby I Eefused 

Windsor | $100 



$100 

$200 

$100 

$100 

No report 

No report 

$100 

No Model School 

Eefused 

No report 

$100 

No report 

$100 

$100 

$100 

$100 

$100 

SlOO 



Walkerton 
Wotodstock 
Welland.... 
Yorkville . . , 



$100 
$100 
$100 
$100 



No reports from 10. Eefused, 4. Granted $100 and over, 36. 
Several County Councils had not met at the time of making report by Principal to 
Sub-Committee. G. W. EOSS. 

11.5 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 

APPENDIX D. 

Extracts from the Reports of Public School Inspectors. 

County of Glengarry. 

Extract from Report of Donald McDiarmid, Esq., M.D., Inspector. 

Teachers' Association. — Two meetings, each continuing two days, were held during 
the year, and, as far as practicable, the spirit of the Eegulations was carried out. The 
attendance of the Teachers at both meetings was good, and much interest taken in the 
proceedings. The only pecuniary assistance received was the Government allowance. 

Township Boards. — Shortly before the day appointed for the Annual School Meet- 
ings, at the request of several ratepayers, residents of different j)arts of the County, who 
were favourable towards the establishment of Township Boards of School Trustees, I 
sent circulars to all the Public School authorities in the County, requesting them, if they 
thought it advisable, to bring the subject of Township Boards before the ratepayers pre- 
sent at the Annual School Meetings. An expression of the feelings of the ratepayers of 
the majority of the schools showed that they are averse to any change which will disturb 
the existing order of Section Trustees. The difficulties which small, weak and struggling 
sections have, of keeping their schools open during the whole year, would be removed 
were all the schools in the township in charge of one Board of Trustees. A serious 
hindrance to the progress of Education lies in the number of small school sections. 
When the townships were first divided into school sections, the school-houses were built 
in the settled portions, but when the whole township was occupied, attempts made to 
change the site to a central locality led to disputes and the formation of new, small and 
irregularly bounded sections. 

County of Stoemont. 
Extract from. Bepoi-t of A. McNaughton, Esq., Inspector. 

The progress of the Public Schools in this County during the last few years has 
been satisfactory, considering the unfavourable circumstances caused by the general de- 
pression pervading all the material interests of the country and all classes of the com- 
munity. 

Almost the last relics of the old regime, in the shape of dilapidated school-houses, 
have now disappeared and ceased to disfigure the landscape in our rural sections. The 
sites formerly occupied by those neglected and time-worn structures are now agreeably 
taken up by comparatively neat and comfortable buildings, fitted with conveniences for 
training the youth of our land in the practical studies requisite to qualify them for the 
discharge of their daily avocations when they arrive at years of maturity. 

The progress made in improving the internal management and discipline of the 
schools is equally satisfactory. The theory ard practice of teaching are more system- 
atically studied and more successfully carried out in practice by the teachers, both in the 
government of the schools and in imparting a knowledge of the several branches of 
Public School instruction. 

One of the greatest hindrances to the permanent improvement of the schools is the 
frequent change of teachers. This is an evil which will always impede the progress of 
our rural schools as long as the school section method of management continues. Under 
the Township Board system the evil complained of would be rendered less injurious and 
reduced to comparatively small proportions. 

The present method of apportioning the Public School Grants to the several sections 
of a township by the County Inspector I consider to be unfair to the weaker sections. 
The schools which are situated in poor and thinly settled localities receive the smallest 
sums in aid of local effort, while the large and wealthy sections which are comparatively 
independent of external aid, receive by far the largest share. The trustees of those poor 

116 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) . A. 1880 



sections are compelled to employ legally qualified teachers as well as those more favour- 
ably situated, and in order to do so they must tax their constituents at a rate double and 
in some instances treble, that imposed upon those residing in more wealthy sections, and 
yet they can only secure the services of the cheapest class of teachers. The Township 
Board system would provide a remedy for this evil, but as the introduction of that 
system seems to be indefinitely postponed I think in the meantime some other remedy 
should be sought for, and I am persuaded that the desired remedy can be found in a 
partial change in the method of apportioning the school funds. If a minimum sum of 
say twenty dollars would be apportioned out of each school grant to every school em- 
ploying a qualified teacher, and the balance of the grant apportioned to all the schools 
as at present in proportion to their attendance, a step would be taken towards putting 
the weaker sections upon a more equal footing compared with the populous and wealthy 
sections of the township. This is a modification of the method at present employed in 
apportioning the Government Grant to the several High Schools of the Province. If 
the principle is beneficial in its application to the High Schools I see no reason why its 
operation should not be equally so in its application to the rural Public Schools of a 
township. The reasons which recommend the system as applicable to the High Schools, 
appear to be equally forcible in favour of its adoption in the distribution of the funds to 
the Public Schools. 

The supply of qualified teachers has hitherto been inadequate, but the large number 
of candid r.tes who have recently succeeded in passing the Third-Class Examination has 
relieved ihe previous scarcity. The great majority of our teachers, however, belong to 
the third-class, very few of them holding Provincial Certificates. 

Notwithstanding the depression universally prevailing throughout the land, I have 
much pleasure in stating that the salaries of teachers are almost the only kind of wages 
in this part of the country which have not sufl'ered diminution. 

The introduction of County Model Schools is a step in the right direction, and sup- 
plies a want hitherto strongly felt, especially in the rural schools. My experience in con- 
nection with these institutions is that no other means can, at so little cost to the rate- 
payers, furnish machinery productive of so much benefit. The school in this County 
has been eminently successful in preparing young teachers for the arduous duties which 
they have in prospect, and many of them have already proved, by their worth in the 
school -room, how well they had profited by the training received in the Model School. 

The meetings of the Teachers' Association have been well attended by the teachers 
of the County. 

County of Dundas. 
Extract from Report of Arthi'r Brown, Esq.^ Inspector. 

The instruction given in the County Model School to teachers-in-training is already 
showing gratifying results in better classification, and distribution of time, in the schools, 
as well as in better modes of teaching, and much more marked results may be looked 
for as time passes and as Model Schools get settled into good working order and on 
established bases. I look on the introduction of these schools as one of the most im- 
portant steps taken for years towards rendering the Public Schools really efficient. 

A goodly number of teachers are now in attendance at the High Schools of the 
County, prosecuting their studies with a view to passing, in July, the non-professional 
Second-class Examination. Several of those who passed that examination last summer 
are in attendance at the Normal Schools, while others are only waiting their turn to be 
admitted, so that there is a good prospect of being able to report, next year, a respect- 
able number of Second-class teachers engaged in the County. The change by which 
the training of Second-class teachers at the Normal Schools has been confined to pro- 
fessional subjects, and the Intermediate and Non-professional Examinations made uniform, 
has given an impetus to the High Schools and a needed encouragement to teachers to 
strive for a higher grade of certificate. 

I have to report a pretty full attendance at the meetings of the Teachers' Associa- 
tion of the County. It has come to be looked on by all parties as wanting in esprit de 

117 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



corps for teachers to fail in their attendance. According to resohition, after each meet- 
ing the Secretary notifies each Trustee corporation that their teacher has, or has not, 
been present at the session of the Association. This practice has had a most beneficial 
efl'ect in the way of securing the presence and co-operation of the teachers. 

County of Eussell. 
Extract from Report of the Rev. Thomas Garrett, B.A., Insjyector. 

I am happy to be able to state that, notwithstanding the severe trials endured by 
the ratepayers during the past year, the cause of Education has not languished. 

Teachers. — The most important feature of progress of the last year is the improve- 
ment in the quality of teachers employed. Sixty-six teachers have been employed 
during the whole 3'ear, excepting two schools vacant for six months. Five of these 
"were of the second-class, thirt}'-five of the third, and twenty-six special. The specials 
are chiefly confined to schools in which the French language is taught. Ten of the 
third-class have been trained at Model Schools, and evince an intelhgent comprehension 
of their position. Many of the specials are teachers of experience, and contmne to im- 
prove in the art of teaching owing to their appreciation of the advantages to be derived 
from visiting other schools and attendance at the Teachers' Association Meetings. 

I repeat my assertion of last year, that the sooner our schools are governed by 
Township School Boards, the quicker will the rising generation reap the benefits of 
that sound and liberal education otherwise provided for. 

The Teachers Association. — The genuine source of the teacher's genuine success is in 
proportion as the teacher patronizes the meetings, lectures, and discussions. Our 
Association has been in existence about four years, but prior to 1878 our funds would 
not afford the luxury of such aid as we have had at three meetings of last year. 

Every session might be truly characterized as a most exhaustive treatise on the 
most diflicult work of every-day school life ; and I am happy to be able to testify from 
experience that the good fruits are quite apparent in the schools taught by those of our 
teachers, who studiously availed themselves of these meetings. Personally I have be- 
come so favourably impressed with the practical utility of our Association, that I hesitate 
not to express my opinion, that if Teachers' Associations were supported with that intel- 
ligence and liberal aid which they merit from all lovers of education, they would soon 
be regarded as indispensable institutions. 

County of Leeds, District No. 1. 
Extract from. Report of W. R. Bigg, Esq., Inspector. 

I notice with pleasure that the Annual Eeports received from the trustees are on 
the whole much more trustworthy than formerly, nevertheless too much, dependence 
need not be placed on individual items. 

The semi-annual meetings of our Teachers' Institute were well attended, and I 
trust much benefit has been derived therefrom, as an excellent staff of lecturers was 
engaged on each occasion. 

County of Lanark. 

Ewtract jrom Report of H. L. Slack, Esq., M.A., Inspector. 

In some of our municipalities we have too many sections, in some the division lines 
are not so equitably arranged as they should be, while in others, owing chiefly to the broken 
condition of the ccruntry by lakes and streams, the school-house either is not or cannot 
be located at a point accessible to all. In no case have the people availed themselves of 
the privilege of "Township Boards," and the abolition of " sectional boundaries." To 
remove the common complaint above alluded to, and numerous other irregularities and 
incongruities, I would welcome the trial, in at least one of our Townships, of the Town- 

118 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



ship Board system, feeling satisfied that the reform would soon become general. If we 
would establish a uniform rate of taxation ; if we would furnish equal advantages and 
privileges to all; if we would put an end to all difficulties and qunrrels respecting sec- 
tion lines ; if we would diminish the aggregate expenditure for schools, and secure better 
schools, better teachers, more permament teachers, more uniform work, and I may add 
more reliable school returns, then let us adopt the " Township Board System." 

Tcftchers. — One hundred and fifty teachers were engaged in the various schools and 
departments during the year. The following table exhibits their qualifications : 

First-class, Provincial 1 

Second " " 7 

Fn-st " Old County Board 12 

Third " New " 123 

Interim 7 

Total 150 

Though seven only are classed as second-class teachers, it is but fair to state that 
several others, ranked among the third-class, have already passed the non -professional ex- 
amination of the second-class and attended the Model School, and will complete their 
certificates at the Normal School at either Ottawa or Toronto, as soon as they can obtain 
admission. Our High Schools are doing good in this respect, and at each second-class 
and intermediate examination are turning out a number of successful candidates, who 
will eventually swell the ranks of our second-class teachers. During the year one only 
of our teachers completed her certificate at a Normal School, but as a number are now 
waiting admission to that institution, I hope to be able to report more in a year to come. 
Professionally trained teachers are what we want, and it is therefore gratifying to observe 
that a prominent feature in the educational changes of the day is in the direction of 
furnishing the country with such. Our County Model School, for the training of third- 
class teachers, was opened at Perth in September, 1877, and at the first session no less 
than fifty candidates for teachers' certificates were admitted. This number was consid- 
erably in excess of what the regulations prescribed, but as it was the first session, and 
no particular limit had been fixed by the County Board of Examiners, they were allowed 
to attend. Such a departure from the regulations will not be permitted in the future. 
At the second session of the same year there were only ten in attendance. Six of the 
candidates of that year had previously passed the second-class non- professional examina- 
tion. At the first session in 1878, twenty-four attended ; and at the second, nine ; of 
these, ten were second-class non-professional — making in all sixteen of that class, who 
are so far on their road to the Provincial certificates. 

The course of training pursued, and the experience in the "art of teaching" acquired 
in the Model School attendance, is already making itself felt in the several schools in 
.which these teachers are engaged, and as the system is yet in its infancy, it may be 
confidently expected tliat it will improve. The public have at least some guarantee that 
the new teacher does not enter upon his profession an entire novice in that art, but that 
he has been introduced to his work armed with the opinions and methods of those whose 
experience enables them to speak with authority in matters pertaining to the science of 
teaching. And here let me remark that I cannot conceive of a more secure protection 
than exists for the trustees in the engagement of a new teacher, who has not acquired for 
himself a recognized reputation, than the certificate which is now issued. Setting forth, 
as it does, both the literary and the professional standing of its holder, with special 
prominence being given to that all-important qualification embraced under the item 
" Aptitude to teach," it introduces the teacher to the public in no disguised garb of 
scholarship, but in his two-fold capacity of scholar and teacher. Trustees have still 
further access to the professional qualification of the teacher in applying, through the 
Inspector, for the candidate's record at the Model School as set forth in the "Final 
Eeport " of the Head jMaster, It cannot be admitted, nor could it be reasonably ex- 
pected, that all who are sent out by this fint of the Board of Examiners are equally 

119 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



qualified for the work in which they are to engage, but their characters are wdtteu. 
Let the certificates be examined carefully before engagement, and subsequent disappoint- 
ment may be avoided. 

Of the seven teachers who held " interim " certificates, it is only just to say that 
nearly all of them were employed in the capacity of assistants, and had previously held 
third-class certificates. Two onl}' were licensed to teach who had never held regular 
certificates, and they were so qualified, after having failed slightly at the third-class 
examination, in order to fill schools in remote sections, where teachers could not be 
obtained even after advertising for them. 

Teachers' Association. — Our Association had two very successful meetings during the 
year : the first at Perth, in the month of May, when we re-modelled our constitution so 
as to conforn,i with the regulations of the Department ; the second, in Almonte, in the 
month of December. There was an unusually large attendance of teachers at both of 
these meetings ; several valuable papers were read, and discussed, and the utmost enthu- 
siasm prevailed. 

I am happy to be able to report our Association to be in thorough working order. 

All that we are lacking in is funds, and we have not yet been able to obtain the 
Government allowance on account of not having secured a grant from the County. This 
we hope to succeed in yet. 

County of Eenfrew. 
Extract from Report of E. J. Scott, Esq., B.A., Inspector. 

Xeiv and Remote Townships. — An extensive circuit in this County borders on the Dis- 
trict of Nipissing and the back parts of Hastings and Addington. The land throughout 
this portion of the County is very poor, in some cases absolutely barren. As a conse- 
quence, the settlers are generally poor, and have to depend on the opportunities offered 
by the lumber trade to obtain a livelihood. This industry has been so greatly depressed 
during the last few years, and is being so rapidly removed far back by the lumberman's 
axe and the still more extensive agency of devastating fires, that the settlers in many of 
these townships are in a worse condition than when they first settled on the land. They 
are therefore quite unable to support efficient schools even of the lowest grade. 

The poor and broken land affects schools injuriously in another way. By causing 
many lots to be unoccupied it produces a scattered population. In the formation of 
sections, therefore, if a sufficient area is included in the limits to afford a valuation capa- 
ble of supporting a school, many of the children are precluded, by distance, from at- 
tending. 

If, on the other hand, the section be so formed as to allow all the children included 
to attend, the total valuation is so low as to render the levy for school purposes an in- 
tolerable burden. 

In tome instances, indeed, though the school section is so large as to preclude the 
possibihty of many of the children attending, the valuation is far too small to support a 
school at a reasonable rate. 

The only remedy for this state of things is in obtaining aid from the Poor School 
Fund, and as nearly all the sections in these townships are equally poor, it would be 
plainly absurd to look for special municipal aid. 

The necessity therefore for relaxing the condition requiring previous special muni- 
cipal aid in such cases is very evident, and I am confident the wisdom of the Depart- 
ment in so doing will be proved by the results. 

School-houses. — These are, with a few exceptions, fairly situated to the sections in 
which they are located. In a few instances I have been successful in inducing the 
trustees to provide better ones ; but owing to the great depression of the times I have 
not felt justified in attempting any stringent measures in this respect. 

Model School. — As the result of unprejudiced and careful observation in this respect, 
I am pleased to be able to report that the schools in charge of Model School teachers 
are better organized and managed than those in charge of teachers who have had no such 
training, excepting some few cases where lengthened experience has to some extent made 
up for the want of professional training in the first place. 

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43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



Teachers' Association. — This institution was inaugurated and two regular meetings 
were held duriug the past year. The attendance of teachers was good, and the hearty 
interest manifested by all in the work of the Association gives promise of beneficial results. 

County of Pkince Edward. 

Extract from Report of J. 1). Plutt, Esq., B.A. Inspector. 

At no former period during my connection with the schools of Prince Edward, have 
I found them so generally prosperous as duriug the former part of last year. 

The average attendance of pupils for the year, in the whole county was 47 per cent, 
of the names on the register — an improvement of 2 per cent, over the previous year. 

The increased activity in educational ati'aii-s, as evinced by the frequent examinations 
of various kinds now held at regular intervals, has exerted a very beneficial influence 
upon the public mind. Two of these examinations — those for entrance to the High 
Schools, and for third-class certificate — appeal directly to the teachers and pupds of the 
Public Schools, and a spirit of progress and emulation being excited ia these parties, is 
very naturally extended to the parents and employers generally. There is doubtless 
room for the objection that, in some instances, too great pressure and excitement result 
from these severe mental tests, but it is equally undeniable, that never before in the 
history of our country have its youth been led to cherish such ardent desires for a 
thorough education. 

Great improvement is observable in the methods of instruction now generally 
adopted by teachers. The increased public notice taken of the results of examinations, 
thus thoroughly testing a teacher's work, has had much to do with prompting him to 
seek the most approved methods. This has also been greatly aided by the character of 
the examination questions which, as a rule, have been framed so as to test mental train- 
ing, instead of mere acquisitions of the memory. 

The system of County Model Schools, though excellent in theory, has not proved as 
successful in practice as the friends of education could desire. 

The first difficulty is experienced in finding the right men for the head of these in- 
stitutions, — men who, besides holding the requisite First-class Certificates, are thor- 
oughly acquainted with the most approved methods of teaching. The Principal of a 
Model School should, of all others, be a model teacher; and unless this be the case, the 
name is misleading. Many hold First-class Certificates without either the training or 
experience of successful teachers. This state of things must be remedied before the 
system will prove worthy of the high place assigned it in our educational economy. 

Another practical difficulty of considerable importance arises from the fact that our 
County Model Schools, consisting as they do of large graded schools, are for that very 
reason most unlike those over which the young teacher will be appointed to preside at 
the completion of his course. Many erroneous ideas in classification and general man- 
agement are thereby inculcated, which must be unlearned at the commencement of prac- 
tical work in a small rural school. The formation of a mixed division in the Model 
School is seldom attempted and, I believe, never thoroughly carried out. There might 
be, supplementary to the present Model Course, a visit of observation, of a week or more, 
at some of the most efficient Public Schools of the County, to be'selected by the Inspector. 
This would prove a partial remedy of the difficulty. 

The system of Township Boards of Trustees, to which some of the changes point, 
will not, for a long time, be popular here, and if ever adopted will, in my opinion, give 
rise to evils hardly less serious than those which it is expected to remedy. 

County of Hastings — Northern District. 
Extract from Report of W. Mackintosh, Esq., Inspector. 

The handsome and commodious building erected in Madoc Village, for the accom- 
modation of the Model School, deserves special mention. It is a two-story brick struc- 
ture, with a mansard roof and cupola. The interior contains, on the ground floor, a large 

121 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



assembly room, furnished with folding seats and desks, a gallery room and three lobbies. 
The second story has two class-rooms (furnished like the assembly room), a gallery 
room, a library and apparatus room, and two lobbies. 

There are three entrances — a front entrance, for visitors and teachers, and two side 
entrances for boys and girls respectively. 

The whole is heated with hot air. It is an honour not only to Madoc but also to 
the County. 

In S. S. 10, Huntingdon, a very tasteful and well-furnished brick school-house has 
been completed. In appearance and convenience it has no superior among the rural 
school-houses of the district, while the furniture (of the same pattern as that in the 
Model School) with which it is supplied, leaves it without a rival. 

There are now in North Hastings but two or three really bad school-houses. The 
worst of these the Trustees have formally promised to replace in 1880, by a building 
suitable to the requirements of the locality. With it the last of the old-time huts will 
have disappeared. 

Model School. — This institution commenced its operations at the beginning of 1878, 
Two sessions were held during the year — the first in January and February, and the 
second in November and December. In the former there were eight teachers in train- 
ing in attendance, all of whom received third-class certificates at the end of the session, 
and in the latter fourteen teachers were trained, ten of whom obtained certificates. For 
the greater part of the first session I gave daily instructions to the students on school 
law, school organization, discipline, and methods of teaching. Lack of leisure prevented 
me from giving so much assistance in November and December. I, however, was able 
to explain to the students the method ot teaching one or two subjects, and to aid the 
Principal in otner ways. 

Since its establishment the Model School has steadily advanced in management, 
discipline and general efficiency. It has now a staff of four efficient teachers. The 
Principal holds a First-class, Grade A, Provincial Certificate. The second and third 
assistants have Second-class Provincial Certificates, and the fourth assistant has suc- 
cessfully passed the non-professional second class examinations. Being thoroughly im- 
pressed with the opinion that the Model School will have, for good or evil, a very 
important influence on the schools of the riding, I have striven, by frequent visits and 
examinations, and by consultations, with teachers and trustees, to enhance its usefulness. 
In my efl'orts to obtain this end I have been heartily seconded by the Board of Trustees 
and by the teachers. 

Teachers Asfiociation. — This organization, which has been the means of accomplish- 
ing much good during the past five years, still meets regularly. During the year the 
bi-mouthly meetings were, on the whole, well attended. 

At the semi-annual conventions, held in January and October, the attendance was 
verv large. At the latter the Association was honoured by the presence of the Minister 
of Education ; at both we had the valuable assistance of Dr. McLellan, Senior High 
School Inspector, for whose advice and instruction the teachers are much indebted. 

The great majority of our teachers are fully alive to the benefits to be derived from 
attendance at these gatherings. A few, who are by no means remarkable for efficiency, 
are present as seldom as possible. Those teachers who least require the instruction 
given at the Convention, are always present ; those who need it most are frequently late, 
inattentive or absent. Every trustee and ratepayer is directly interested in the pros- 
perity of the Association. The sole object of its existence is to benefit schools. For 
this reason parents and trustees should foster and encourage regular attendance of 
teachers. 

County of Hastings, — Southern District. 

Extract from Report oj John Johnston, Esq., In.yiector. 

Irregular attendance is a serious hindrance to the progress of many schools, and 
calls forth the earnest attention of every rate-payer in the county. 

It is encouraging to know that the percentage of average attendance is gradually 

122 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



increasing. Last year it was 51 per cent, and that was greater than for any previous 

year. 

The average attendance for the year 1878 in the portion of the county under my 
jurisdiction is 53, an increase of two per cent, over the previous year. 

It may not he out of place to show you how we compare with some of the counties 
near us. 

It is pleasing to note that 53 per cent, is much greater than in many of them, as 
shown by reports. In Prince Edward the percentage of average attendance is 47 ; 
Lennox and Addington 39 ; Durham and Northumberland each 42 ; Frontenac 36 ; 
Leeds 44 ; Peterborough and Victoria each 40 ; Middlesex 44 ; Oxford 47 ; Waterloo 52 
per cent. 

It is sometimes stated that our school system is expensive, but I think the reverse 
is true, as the following will show : 

The whole amount of money expended for school purposes in 1878 amounted, as 
previously stated, to $31,285.25 and this includes $2,079.19 paid for the purchase of sites 
and building. This amount has been gradually becoming less every year, for nearly 
every section has now a good schoOl-house with grounds well fenced. 

This being the amount expended, and taking all the children enrolled on the regis- 
ters, the cost per head of the whole division is $5.12| being 7^ cents per pupil less than 
the previous year. 

If the amount paid for sites and building be not included, the cost of teaching and 
maintaining the schools for each registered pupil would be $4.80. 

I was able in my last report to speak very encouragingly in reference to the thorough- 
ness and efliciency of the public schools. I am still able to say that there has been, 
perceptible improvement during the past year. The greatest care has been taken to see 
that the scholars are taught efficiently in, at least, the important subjects of reading, 
spelling, arithmetic, writing, grammar, composition and geography. These are subjects 
that should be taught thoroughly and well to all boys and girls. A number of schools 
teach Algebra, Euclid, and the higher subjects. 

To have good schools, we must have good teachers ; for without these the youth of 
the country will not receive that thorough training necessary to fit them for the import- 
ant duties of after life. 

Everything that can be done to raise the standard of teaching and improve the 
young and inexperienced teacher, should have from the intelligent people of the country 
that encouragement it deserves. As the meetings of the South Hastings Teachers' In- 
stitute have done much to improve the teachers, they are still continued. 

Twenty-seven candidates were trained in the Model School last September and 
October, and many of them are doing their work to the satisfaction of all concerned. 



County of Haliburton, 
Extract from Rejjort of (J. D. Curry, Esq., B.A., Inspector. 

Having been appointed to this inspectorate during the latter half of the year, I shall 
reserve any remarks as to the quality of the work done until my next rej)ort. I will 
only say that I find many of the school.s much in advance of my expectations, both in 
point of attainments and efficienc3\ 

The general depression, and more especially that of the lumber trade, has affected 
the schools very much. Taking this into consideration, there has been progress of a 
most gratifying nature. 

In my intercourse with trustees, teachers and parents, I have, as a general rule, 
found all willing to make an honest endeavour to comply with the requirements of the 
Education Act and Piegulations of the Department. 

The excellent compendium of School Law, issued by the Department and supplied 
to the school corporations, fills what was felt to be a great need. 

123 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



I have to thank the Department for the aid from the Poor School Fund, granted to 
the different sections in this inspectorate, as well as for the kindly interest taken in the 
Educational progress of this remote region. 



County of Ontario. 
Extract from Report of James McBrien, Esq., Inspector. 

There are many considerations, which enable me to state to you that the wave of 
progress flows onward to the maturity of perfection, gradually deepening and widening. 
I regret to have to state that the strength of this wave is greatly diminished, and its 
velocity retarded, as it strikes against the rocks of frequent change of teachers, irregu- 
larity of attendance of pupils, and erroneous conceptions of the nature of Education. 

In the whole course of School Legislation, there has been nothing calculated so 
well to augment, clarify, and beautify this wave as the Eegulation requiring all teachers 
to be professionally trained, before they assume the momentous responsibility of edu- 
cating youth. 

The Intermediate Examination is a grand tributary to the great Educational wave. 

Looking at this Examination, with reference to Public School Education, I am of 
opinion that the standard in the subjects of Arithmetic and Grammar has been lowered 
too much. 

Entrance Examinations. — These are the best competitive Examinations for a County. 
In the year 1878, about 200 passed into our High Schools in this County, and therefore, 
the fifth class has decreased in numbers. If these Examinations cost a little more than 
formerly, most assuredly the people are reaping a golden harvest in return for their 
money. 

County Model Schools. — The establishment of these was a stride in the right direc- 
tion. They are doing a good work, but they can be made do a better. 



County of York, — Northern District. 
Extract from Report of David Eotheringham, Esq., Inspector. 

Without any circumstances of special importance to note, it is still gratifying to be 
able to state that fair progress has been made in nearly aU departments of Public School 
work during the year. 

The Teachers' Association has held its regular meetings with encouraging results, 
although nearly half of the teachers, including a large proportion of the younger mem- 
bers of the profession, seldom or never attend. Of course some are unable, owing to 
distance, to reach the conventions except at much cost and inconvenience. Still the 
fact remains that many can, but do not, give attendance on these half-yearly meetings, 
where the most competent find great help in their work. 

Through the grant from the Department we have been able to add during the year 
some sixty valuable works to our professional library, and at the same time have secured 
the services of able educationists from a distance. fmhHij 

In regard to the Model School, it is necessary to state that the accommodation re- 
quired and promised, has been provided, and that the work done there, is of a highly 
practical character. 

The compendium of School Law and Regulations was distributed round during the 
fall, and is universally hailed as meeting a long felt and perplexing want. 

124 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



County of York, — Southern District. 
I Extract from Report of James Hodgson, Esq., Inspector. 

Great satisfaction has beeu experienced by me, in having witnessed from year to 
year, the gradual removal of some of the obstacles, which greatly obstructed the efficient 
administration of our School system, in the earlier years of its development. Formerly, 
the educational standing of many teachers was comparatively low, and the means for 
professional training quite limited, on account of the small number of teachers, who had 
had the advantage of attending a Normal School. At the present time our High Schools 
and Collegiate Institutes more than supply the teaching formerly given in the Normal 
School, and the County Model Schools furnish in every County the professional train- 
ing so necessary in many ca'^es to qualify young teachers for efficiently discharging the 
duties of their profession. Besides, the equipment of our Public Schools is, upon the 
whole, very much improved, and the apparatus, requisite for illustraticg and explaining 
school work, is much more get\erally provided. Sach being the case, we may reason- 
ably expect better progress and greater proficiency, and I am happy to be able to state 
that t' is has beeu realized in some schools, since the date of my last report. Undoubt- 
edly, niach improvement is being made also in the methods of instruction, especially so 
in reading, arithmetic, English grammar and geography, and I am looking forward to 
greater progress in the future, on recount of the increased facilities for the training of 
teachers in our High Schools, Collegiate Institutes, County Model Schools, and Normal 
Schools, making them more conversant with better methods of imparting instruction, 
and more ambitious to excel in the profession of teachnig. 

It is most gratifying to know tliat at the commencement of the current year, the 
number of changes of teachers was much less than in some previous years, and it is to 
be hoped that this very great drawback to the efficiency of our schools will soon be 
reduced to a minimum 

The High School Entrance Examinations are now quite influential for good to many 
of our Public Schools, a great deal of healthy emulation being produced thereby in 
many school sections. Both teachers and pupils are quite in earnest about their success 
in passing these examinations, and I find invariably, that, when earnestness and dili- 
gence are combined in school work, the result is quite satisfactory. I make it a rule in 
the inspection of schools, to encourage tiie more advanced pupils to try to pass the 
Entrance Examination, even though they have no intention of leaving their own Public 
School, as it serves the purpose of formiug what maybe very justly called a Competitive 
Examination, and brings into active play the combined efforts of both teachers and 
pupils, the surest means and the only " royal road to learning." 

There were two sessions of the Model School in 1878. At the first session, 29 stu- 
dents were in attendance, 16 females, and 13 males ; of these 7 passed first-rate, 14 
second-rate and 2 third-rate. In the second session, 28 students were enrolled, 14 
males and 14 females. Of these 4 passed in the first class; 8 in the second; 13 in the third; 
and 2 in the fourth, and one left, on account of sickness, before the close of the session, 
as shown by the final report of the Head Master to the County Board of Examiners. 

In my last report to the Education Department, I ventured to say " that County 
Model Schools will supply the training to many candidates for Third-class Certificates, 
so highly necessary before entering upon the teaching profession, and will ensure such 
a knowledge of school organization, classification, practical teaching, school law and re- 
gulations, as will be of essential service to such candidates, upon entering upon the im- 
portant duties of Public School teachers." At the close of another year, I am now 
thoroughly confirmed in the correctness of that opinion, and particularly so on account 
of the decision of the Trustees of the Yorkville Model School not to engage any but 
teachers with Provincial Certificates, and its now having on its staff seven teachers, all 
of whom have Provincial Certificates, and thus fully answer the important end designed 
by its establishment, viz., that of an efficient training school for the Southern Division of 
the County of York. 

9 125 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



In conclusion, I think I may, without flattery, congratulate you on the sound pro- 
gress which Public School Education has made under your fostering care, as Minister of 
Education, and I have no doubt that, as years flow on, the importance and advantages 
thereof will be more fully realized, and that the Pro^dnce of Ontario will have for its 
permament motto, " A sound, liberal, and moral education, free for all, and within the 
reach of all." 



County of Brant. 
Extract from Report of M. J. K&lly, Esq., M.D., Inspector. 

It affords me pleasure to be able to state at the outset that the trustees and people 
generally continue to manifest that intelligent interest in the cause of popular education 
which I have had occasion to refer to in previous reports, and that the teachers, as a rule, 
faithfully discharge their onerous and responsible duties. Nothing occurred during the 
year to mar the harmony which ought to characterize, and, which, I rejoice to be able to 
say, always has characterized the management of our Public Schools. Complaints from 
any quarter have been exceedingly rare during the last six or seven years ; and when 
troubles have arisen, as troubles will arise sometimes, they have been usually quietly re- 
moved by a spirit of mutual concession and forbearance. 

The improvement in methods of instruction to which I have before adverted still 
continues, and as Public School teachers of all grades must now take a special course of 
insti'uction in professional subjects before they can engage in teaching, we have reason to 
expect increased progress in the best modes of imparting knowledge, and in the discipline 
and management of schools. An encouraging feature of the times, in connection with 
our schools, is the disposition on the part of trustees to continue and adequately reward 
the services of successful teachers. In many of our best schools the masters have been 
in the employment of their respective Boards for several years. 

The second session of the County Model School opened in September, and continued 
two months. All the candidates, 26 in number, passed the Professional Examination. 
This institution is doing good work and deserves encouragement. The principal subjects 
of instruction are education, including school organization, management, and discipline ; 
school-law, reading, mental arithmetic and hygiene. In addition to receiving instruction 
in these subjects, the candidates are required to spend several hours every day in the class 
rooms, at practical work, under the supervision of expex'ienced teachers. Before the 
establishment of County Model Schools, third-class teachers knew next to nothing of their 
professional work or duties when they had passed their examinations, — were unable to 
organize a school properly, — had no knowledge of keeping registers, making out reports, 
or managing a school. These defects in their training have now been remedied. The 
Ontario Government contribvited $100 for the maintenance of the Model School, but the 
County Council has not yet made any grant for 1878. 

The Teachers' Institute, now held twice a year, is progressing satisfactorily. The 
attendance still continues to be good, and the work done of great value to all, but especi- 
ally to the young and inexperienced among our teachers. 

Since my last report, a professional Libi-ary consisting of about 200 volumes, besides 
Blackwood and some of the British Quai'terlies and the best Canadian and American Edu- 
cational Journals and Periodicals, have been purchased for the use of the teachers of the 
City and County. The Library has been well patronized, particularly by the County 
Teachers. 

City of Brantford. 

The Public Schools in the City of Brantford have been doing satisfactory work dur- 
ing the year. The order has been generally good, and the prevailing tone all that could be 
desired. 

I am indebted to R. Ashton, the New England Company's Superintendent, for the 

126 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



following infoi-mation respecting the Mohawk Institute in the neighbourhood of the City, 
and the Indian Schools on the Reserve in Tuscarora and Oneida Townships : 





Teacher's 
Salary per 
annum. 


No. of 

Pujiils on 

Eoll. 


Average 
daily at- 
tendance. 


SuPPORTEn BY 






Mohawk Institution. 
Male Teacher 


$ 
*400| 
*225/ 


90 

51 
■ 50 
39 
31 
29 

30 
35 

44 


90-j 

25 
21 
19 
17 
14 

12 
16 
14 
20 
7 
11 "i 


New England Company (Boarding 
School. ) ( Library, 150 vols. ) 


Six Nations Indian Reserve. 

School No. 2... 

" .. " 3... 

" .. "4. 


250 
250 
250 
250 
250 

275 
250 
250 


Newly formed School Board. 

Members. 

3 appointed by New England Company. 


., " 5... 

" " 6... 

" " 7.... 


3 " Indian Council. 
1 Indian Commissioner. 


" " 8... 


Funds New England Co., $1500 per 


" " 9 


annum. 
Funds, Indian Council, §1500 per annum. 


" " 10... 

Thomas' 11.. . 

Method! st 12 


2.50 42 
150 15 
250 5>4 


Indian Department, $50 per annum per 

School. 
School Board, $100 ; Department, $50. 

Methodist Conference, $200; and In- 
dian Department, $50 per School. 

Band Funds. 


13... 

Mississaguas of New Credit, 14 . . . 


250 
300 


30 

49 


20 



* Receive also board, lodging, and washing. 



County of Lincoln. 
Extract jrom Report of G. B. Somerset, Esq., Inspector. 

In spite of the general financial depression, the income and expenditure were larger 
than ever reported before, the expenditure for teachers' salaries especially shewing an 
increase that has never failed for the last seven years. 

In the fitting of teachers for their work, our High Schools and Collegiate Institutes 
are doing a noble work in the preparation of students for the non-professional examina- 
tion, which must speedily reduce the proportion which third-class certificates now bear to 
the whole number. 

The work of these institutions being supplemented by the professional instruction 
imparted by the County Model Schools, there seems to be little wanting to afford facilities 
to school corporations to secure efficient teachers for their schools. 

In school accommodation,' there is little to report, except that, in almost every in- 
stance, school-houses are being furnished with attention to health and comfort that was 
but seldom thought of a few years ago. 

The neglect of little duties, such as cleaning and repairing are, at present, our greatest 
difficulties, but even these are gradually disappearing. 

127 



43 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 

^ / 

County of Essex — District No. 1. 
Extract from Report of Theodide Girardot, Esq., Inspector. 

It mav be seen from the foregoing statistics, that there were in my inspectorate in 
1871, 40 schools, not including those of the Town of Sandwich, with an average attend- 
ance of 1,446. We have now 52 schools and 10 departments, with an average attendance 
of 2,118, showing an increase of 12 schools, 10 departments, and 672 in average attend- 
ance. 

In every township the school-liouses and accommodations, in general, do not leave 
anything to be desired. The progress which has been made all around is very satisfactory, 
and will no doubt continue to be so. I expect to have 4 additional schools and 1 depart- 
ment in 1879 ; consequently I will have, including those of Sandwich, 59 schools and 13 
departments to visit ; besides these, also the R. C. S. S. of Amherstburg, of which there 
are 2 with 2 departments. 

I am glad to say that the condition of our teachers is improving. Though the times 
are certainly hard, their salaries have not been lowered, but some have, on the contrary, 
been raised. Poor teachers are gradually being replaced by good ones. Our Model 
School is still under efficient management and is doing a good work. 

The majority of our teachers hold third-class certihcates, but the number of those 
with second-class is fast increasing, and it aftbrds me pleasure to be able to say here that 
our High School, under its able and worthy Head Master, is proving a source of gTeat 
benefit to the County. It is very well attended. 

Our convention was again very successful this year ; the teachers made it a point to 
attend the sessions regularly and on time ; over a hundred were present, including those 
from Windsor, and several from the South Fading. A large number of our Reeves, 
clergymen, and leading citizens in the vicinity also attended. Messrs. McLellan and Ross 
have for a second time contributed materially to the success of our Institute, by their 
presence and interesting lectures. The teachers and friends of Education in Essex, are 
under lasting obligations to these two gentlemen, for the zeal and interest they have always 
shown for the success of our conventions. 

Though much has been done in Essex for Education since 1871, still there is plenty 
of room for improveinent. There is always the old complaint, irregular attendance, to 
remedy effectually. This is at present the only serious drawback to a more rapid progress 
in our schools. 

Town of Sandwich. 

The Board of School Trustees in this town is composed of gentlemen who well 
understand the requirements and the good of the schools under their charge. If the 
teachers they employ give them satisfaction, they retain them as long as those teachers 
continue to do their duty. Were this the case in some of our rural districts, and not the 
mere question of dollars and cents, the progress in Education would have been much more 
marked. Libraries for the use of the pupils were established in schools No. 1 and No. 2, 
and the number of volumes is yearly increasing. 

Town of Amheestburg. 

The R. C. S. S. here continue to prosper. The attendance is much better than in 1877, 
especially in the senior department (boys). The Head Master spares nothing for the wel- 
fare and advancement of his pupils. 

The Board of School Trustees, who are true friends of Education, are making arrange- 
ments to build a large substantial school-house of brick or stone, which is to cost some 
$3,000 or $4,000. They will be assisted pecuniarily in this work by the Rt. Rev. John 
Walsh, Bishop of the diocese of London, who has at heart the best interests of Education. 

The building when completed will be occupied by all the female departments, and the 
junior departments of boys, all of which are still under the care of the sisters of J. M. J., 
who are entirely devoted to their duties. 

128 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 

District of Parry Sound. 

Extract from Report of J. R. Miller, Esq., Inspector. 

^''i°^-'Our first visit was made to Parry Island on 22nd August, and although the notice 
given was short we were pleased to meet in the new school-house, scarcely completed, the 
Chief of the band and 14 other Indians. The conference was carried on through an iii- 
tei'preter (Mr. Elliott), and although somewhat long it was certainly very interesting. 
The correspondence with Dominion Gov^ernment and Ontario Education Department was 
explained, and in their own peculiar way was considered quite satisfactory to them. 

I went to Parry Island on Monday, 9th instant, and was indeed highly pleased with the 
result. Twenty -five young Indians and fifteen of the pai'ents were present. We proceeded 
to register the pupils and did nicely for a time until one was brought forward without a name 
— many are yet in Paganism. With the aid of Mr. Elias, who has been secured to take 
charge of the school, I proceeded to ascertain the knowledge of pupils, and learned that 
one could read in second book, one in first book, and the others must commence at begin- 
ning of work. I was very much pleased with the attention given and the very ready 
manner in which all learned in a very short time to count, and even to select words in 
first lesson. 

Captain Skene, the Indian Superintendent, is a graduate of a Scottish University, 
and was for many years Local Superintendent on Amherst Island, Ont. He takes a very 
great interest in the work thus begun so auspiciously, and we have great reason to be 
thankful that he has promised to render all the aid in his power to make this and all the 
other schools in the Indian Reserve a success. 



Town of Chatham. 

Extract from Eeport of the Rev. A. McColl, Inspector. 

The condition of the schools is, it seems to me, satisfactory, in some respects very 
much so, though there are certain drawbacks in other respects. There is a diminution 
in the number of children of school age. This is partly accounted for by the fact, that 
some families have left town and gone to reside in the country, in the vicinity, while 
others have gone to other towns and villages. The attendance has been also afiected to 
some extent by sickness, and the delay, however unavoidable, in opening one of the schools 
after the summer vacation, produced its natural effects. According to the censiis, there 
were attending the public schools, in 1877, 1,002 ; in 1878, 994:. 

There were attending the Roman Catholic Schools in 1877, 259 ; in 1878, 227. 

Private Schools " " 260 " " 164 

" not " School " " 169 " " 198. 

" was reported born blind " " 1 " " 2. 

deaf and dumb " " 4 " " 2. 

The total number in 1877, was 1,695 ; 1878, 1,588. 

There were fourteen from the Central School admitted to the High School in 1878. 

The Queen Street School (formerly known as the Chrysler Ward School) was in 1878 
so greatly altered that it may be almost regarded as a new school. It is a two-storied 
building, with a frontage on Queen Street of sixty-nine feet, and in width twenty-six feet. 
There is a wing at the back 26 feet by 38. There are three rooms on each floor 23 feet 6 inches 
by 27 feet, and the ceiling is 12 feet 4 inches in the clear. Each room is seated for sixty-two 
pupils. The second story is reached by two broad stairways, one in the front of the building 
and the other in the wing at the rear. 

The stairway halls are 8 and 10 feet wide. The school-rooms are ventilated by ducts, 
which admit the air direct from the outside. There are ventilators in each room to cairy 

129 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



off the impure air. The lot on which the building stands has an area of almost sixty-five 
thousand feet, and is well graded up and drained. 

There are two good wells, the premises are well fenced, and all the outside buildings 
are in a state of good repair. There are about seven hundred feet (700 cubic feet) for 
each room. 

The repairs made during the summer of 1878 cost about $4,500. This school property 
is worth S9,000. 

Since the services of Mr. Thomas, the Professor of music, were dispensed with, music 
has been little cultivated, It is not however neglected, though few of the teachers are 
fully qualified to teach it. 



APPENDIX E. 
Orders in Council. 

I. — Appointment of Sub-Examiners for December Examinations, Dated the 31st 

DAY OF December, A.D. 1877. 



II. — Appointment of Additional Sub-Examiners for December Examinations, Dated 
the 31st day of December, A.D. 1877. 



III. — Regulations Respecting Appeals by Candidates at Examinations, Dated 
THE 4th day of January, A.D. 1878. 



Regulations Respecting Appeals by Candidates at Examinations of the Depart- 
ment. 

The conditions under which an appeal shall be entertained in respect of an examina- 
tion for a Third-Class Certificate, or for admission to a High School, or for the Inter- 
mediate, or for a Second-Class Non-Professional Examination, which appeal may involve 
the reperusal of the answers given, are as follows: — 

^ Such appeal shall be made within one month after the promulgation of the result 
of the Examination by the Department. 

2. The grounds of such appeal must be specially stated. 

3. A deposit of two dollars with the Department must be made, which deposit will 
be returned to the person appealing if his appeal is sustained, but otherwise to be forfeited. 



TV. — Re, Intermediate Examinations at St. Thomas and Berlin, Dated the 28th 

day of January, A.D. 1878. 

Upon consideration of the report of the Honourable the Minister of Education, dated 
the 9th day of January, 1878, with reference to certain irregularities at the Intermediate 
Examination in July last at the High Schools at St. Thomas and Berlin, and advise that 
the examination of the following candidates at Berlin be disallowed: — 

Jeremiah Scully, and Charles W. Schierholz. 
130 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 

Also, that the examination of the following candidates at St. Thomas be disallowed: — 

William Logan, Archibald MacMillan, William Haight, Charles Grant, George Bannerman 
Maxwell, Barbara Begg, Margaret Martin Colder, Daniel McKellar, Laura McLean, and 
William Coulter. 

The Committee of Council further advise that any grant to the said High Schools 
which may have been apportioned on the basis of the attendance of the said pupils, as passed 
candidates for the Upper School, be disallowed and refunded, or the amount thereof de- 
ducted from any future grants to the said schools respectively. 



V. — High School Established at Mount Forest, Dated the 28th day of January, 

AD. 1878. 



VI.— Examination Frauds, Dated the 2nd day of February, A.D. 1878. 

The Committee of Council have had under consideration the Report of the Honourable 
the Minister of Education, dated the 9th day of January, 1878, wherein he states that on 
the 2nd day of October last, he appointed, under the authority of the Statutes in that be- 
half, Mr. James Hughes, Public School Inspector, to make inquiry with reference to 
certain dishonourable and fraudulent practices connected with the Examination for Public 
School Teachers, held in July last. 

That Mr. Hughes, by his report dated the 27th day of Kovember last, has found that 
thirty-eight of such candidates have been proved to have each respectively by the means 
in his report mentioned, to have been in possession of the examination papers some time 
previous to the examination in July last; and in the schedule of names appearing on his 
report, he has also settled the standing and proposed certificate which would have been 
awarded to each candidate upon the result of their respective examinations, excepting in 
regard to such candidates as acknowledge that they had had the examination papers before 
the conclusion of the reading of their answers, or who failed at such examination. 

That of the foregoing candidates, sixteen were found to have personally paid sub- 
stantial sums of money in order to procure the examination papers in advance. 

The Minister further states that it appears from the report that Robert White, James 
Gilchrist, and Henry Webster, had also access to the examination papers before the ex- 
amination, while communication seems to have passed between John INIcLurg, and another 
candidate who passed papers to him during the examination, but Mr. McLurg states upon 
oath tliat this assistance did not go beyond the extent of 10 marks for the whole examina- 
tion. 

That Mr. McBrien, Public School Inspector for the County of Ontario, is reported 
to have been negligent in conducting the examination at Whitby, inasmuch as he gave 
out the paper on Botany and Physiology on Monday, July 9th, instead of on the Friday 
following, which afforded an opportuiuty for previous knowledge in this paper by candidates. 

That David Forsyth, M.A., Mathematical Master, Berlin High School, is also reported 
to have marked a certain part of the examination papers for Henry T. Collins before the 
examination. 

That James Davison, Mathematical Master Whitby High School, is also reported to 
have aided Henry W. Shanley in obtaining the examination papers and working the more 
difficult parts of the Arithmetic and Algebra papers for him. 

That Charles McPherson Gripton, of Brockville, Public School teacher, is reported 
to have given his evidence in an unsatisfactory manner, and on certain material points 
refused to disclose what he knew. 

The Minister regrets that his efforts to secure the requisite secrecy in the printer's 
office for the printing of the examination papers, were unsuccessful, and that so many 

131 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



candidates seeking to obtain the highest certificates as Public School teachers, should 
liave been found guilty of resorting to such dishonourable and fraudulent means. 

The Minister is willing to believe from the candid acknowledgments made by most of 
the persons examined, that they had overlooked the gravity of their offence, and now that 
this is brought home to them, that they will endeavour by their conduct in the future to 
efface this discredit. In order to afford such an opportunity, the Minister is prepared to 
recommend to your Honour that the several persons be dealt with more leniently now than 
their offence deserves; but that on all future occasions the penalty be an absolute dis- 
qualification from being or becoming Public School Teachers. 

The Minister, under the foregoing circumstances, recommends that the examination of 
the several candidates set forth in the schedule hereto, be declared null and void, and that 
no certificate be issued to any of them, but that any of such candidates may pi'esont them- 
selves for examination after the first day of July next; and that the recommendation shall 
also apply to Pobert White, James Gilchrist and Henry Webster. 

That Mr. McBrien, Public School Inspector, be cautioned against negligence as presiding 
Examiner in future; and that David Forsyth, Mathematical Master, Berlin High School, 
and James Davison, Mathematical Master, Whitby High School, be warned against com- 
mitting any breach of confidence in connection with the examinations. 

Tlae Committee concur in the recommendation contained in the said report, and 
advise that the same be acted upon. 



SCHEDULE OF CANDIDATES. 



No. 


Name of Candidates. 


Residence. 


Certificate. 


1 
2 


William Clarke 

Daniel B. Cornell 

William McGregor 

William Neilly 

James Smith Wood 

Eliza Hudson 

Margaret Meston 

Mary E. Walker 


Toronto 


1st A and Silver Medal. 


3 


Thornhill 


2nd A. 


4 




1st B. 


5 
6 

7 
8 
9 


Bradford 

Norwich 

Hamilton 

London 

Copetown ... 


1st A, Gold Medal. 
2nd A. 

Failed, Gr. I. 
2ndB. 


10 




2nd A. 


11 


Henry T. Collins 


Walkerton 




12 


R. C. Cheeswright 

John A. Dale 

John Dick 

Noble Dickey . . 

Alex. Dickie 

Robert Gormly 

Joseph Hogarth 


2ndB. 


13 
14 
15 


London 

Maple Valley 


2nd A. 


16 




" 


17 
18 
19 


Caledon, E 

Norland 

Heathcote 


2ndB. 
2nd A. 


'20 
21 


Humphrey T. Johnston 


Springfield 

St. Thomas 

Odessa 


<< 


22 




" 


23 


riayter May 

Huc'h McGlone 




2ndB. 


24 




Copied in Arithmetic. 


2.5 
26 


Wm. C. B. Murray 


Harrington 

Bethanj' 

St. Mary's 

Whitby 

Millbank 


2ndB. 
2nd A. 


27 
28 


James Ross 

Ellet S. Rowe 


2nd B. 


29 


John A. Rutherford 

Ansley Smith 

Henry W. Stanley 

James M. Stevenson 

Douglas G. Storms 

Ryerson J. Trumpour 

Joseph A. Webster 

John D. Webster 

Thomas 0. Webster 

George Wilkinson 


2nd A. 


30 


Rockford 




31 
32 
.33 
34 


Duffin's Creek 

Ailsa Craig 

Odessa 

Salmon Point 


2nd B. 
2nd A. 


35 
36 


Whitby 


Copied in Arithmetic. 
2nd A. 


37 






38 




" 









132 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



VII. — Irregularities at Berlin and St. Thomas High School Examinations, Dated 
THE 20th day of February, A.D. 1878. 

The Committee of Council have had under consideration the further report of the 
Honourable the Minister of Education, dated the 15tli day of February instant, hereto 
annexed, with reference to certain irregularities at the Intermediate Examinations in July 
last, at the High School at St. Thomas and Berlin respectively, and advise that the said 
report be acted upon. 

The undersigned respectfully begs to report for the consideration of His Honour the 
Lieutenant-Governor in Council the following respecting the Education Department. 

The undersigned had on the 9th day of January, 1878, the honour to report to 
your Honour in Council the results of the inquiry before Mr. Buchan, High School In- 
spector, concerning certain irregularities at the Intermediate Examination in July last, at 
the High School at St. Thomas and Berlin respectively. Founded vipon which report of 
Mr. Buchan's, the undersigned recommended that the following candidates at Berlin should 
be disallowed their examinations, namely, Jeremiah Scully and Charles W. Schierholz, 
and that the examination of candidates at St. Thomas should be disallowed, namely, 
William Logan, Archibald McMillan, William Haight, Charles Grant, George Banner- 
man Maxwell, Barbara Begg, Margaret Martin Colder, Daniel McKellar, Laura McLean, 
and William Coulter, and upon which recommendation an Order in Council was passed 
accordingly. 

The undersigned has since had the representations of the St. Thomas High School 
Board, in which they urge that the foregoing should be reconsidered upon grounds speci- 
fically stated, that with the exception of William Logan none of the other persons named 
had access to the examination papers in advance of the examination, and that these per- 
sons had willingly come forward and admitted irregularities in communicating with one 
another while in the examination room, but which did not materially aflect the result of 
the examination, and that to apply a strict rule now would subject the High School Board 
and its students to a sti'icter rule than prevailed formerly, or at other High School exam- 
inations, and that the disallowance of such examinations would be as grave a punishment 
as if these persons had been guilty of the positive frauds brought to light before Mr. 
Inspector Hughes. 

That the Board has done all in its power to strictly carry out the Regulations of the 
Department, and that from the delay in concluding the inquiry, the High School Board and 
their candidates will sustain a greater amount of injury than if the disallowance had 
taken place immediately after the irregularities had occurred. 

Under the foregoing circumstances the Minister thinks substantial justice will be 
done and a wholesome warning against such irregularities in future, if the former Order 
in Council, dated 28th January last, is revoked, excepting as to William Logan, and that 
the examination of the several candidates at St. Thomas, other than the said William 
Logan, and also at Berlin respectively be allowed, and that the grant to the said High. 
School be apportioned accoi'dingly. 



VIII. — Leave of Absence Granted to Dr. S. P. May, Dated the 14th day of 

March, A.D. 1878.' 

Upon consideration of the report of the Honourable the Minister of Education, dated 
the 28th day of January, 1878, with reference to the selection by the Government of 
Canada of S. P. May, M.D., Superintendent of the Depository Branch of the Education 
Department, as one of the Secretaries to the Commission in connection with the Paris 
Exhibition; the Committee of Council advise that leave of absence from the first day of 
January last be granted to the said S. P. May, for such period during the current year as 
he may be necessarily engaged at Paris in connection with his said duties. 

133 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



IX, — Certificates Granted Teachers who Passed Examination in December, but 
WHOSE Certificates were Cancelled on Account of being Implicated in 
Examination Frauds, Dated the 12th day of April, A.D. 1878. 

Upon consideration of the report of the Honourable the Minister of Education, the 
Committee of Council advise that such of the teachers whose certificates were cancelled 
under the Order in Council of the 2nd of February last, and who passed the examination 
in December, 1877, he allowed to hold the standing awarded to them at such examination. 



X. — Appointment op Sub-Examiners for July Examination, Dated the 15th day 

of April, A.D. 1878. 



XI. — Certificates Granted to Candidates Deprived op them owing to the Frauds 
at the July Examinations, but who Subsequently became Entitled to First 
Class Certificates, Dated the 10th day of May, A.D. 1878. 

The names are as follows : — 



James E. Mabee, Grade A. 


Douglas G. Storms, ' 


' B. 


John A. Dale, ' 


' B. 


John D. Webster, ' 


' A. 


Isaac Lester Beattie, ' 


' B. 


Richard C. Cheeswright, ' 


' B. 


Alexander Dickie, ' 


' A. 


George Wilkinson, ' 


' B. 


Henry E. Webster, ' 


' B. 



xii.— collingwood " high school " established as a " collegiate institute," 
Dated the 31st day of May, 1878. 



XIII. — Re-imbursing the Trustees op S. S. 4, Oakland, Dated the 12th day op 

June, A.D. 1878. 



XIV. — Revised Regulations as to Public, Separate and High Schools, Dated 

the 4th day of July, A.D. 1878. 

These Regulations are contained in the Compendium of School Law and Regula- 
tions, 1878. 



XV. ^SuRRENDER OF HiGH SCHOOL LaNDS, ISTiAGARA, DATED THE 25tH DAY OF 

September, A.D. 1878. 



XVI. — Surrender of High School Lands, Newmarket, dated the 23rd day 

OF September, A.D. 1878. 

134 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 5.) A. 1880 



XYII. — Regulations as to Authorized Text Books, dated the 27th day of 

September, A.D. 1878. 

The Regulations respecting Text Books in the Public and High Schools and Collegiate 
Institutes are to be read and understood in the sense and to the etfect following : 

The Eighth Regulation respecting Text Books in the Public Schools shall not apply 
to such editions as were printed or published prior to the 18th day of August, A.D. 1877. 



XVIII. — Establishment of a High School at Seaforth, dated the 2nd day 

OF November, A.D. 1878. 



XIX. — ^WiLLiAM J. Graham appointed Caretaker op the Museum, &c., <fec., 
dated the 2nd day of November, A.D. 1878. 



XX. — Omission of Text Books from List of Approved Library and Prize Books, 
dated the 21st day of November, A.D. 1878. 

Upon the recomendation of the Honourable the Minister of Education, the Commit- 
tee of Council advise that the list of books for libraries and prizes, sanctioned by Order in 
Council of 2nd November instant, be amended by omitting therefrom the following 
books, which are of the nature of text books : 

Examination Papers, by McLellan tk Kirkland. 

Key to the same. 

Smith's Primary Drawing Manual. 

" Intermediate " " 

Kirkland's Statics. 
Schmitz' Latin Grammar. 
McLellan's Mental Arithmetic. 
Kirkland's and Scott's " . 



XXI. — Sub-Examiners for December Intermediate Examinations, dated the 
6th day of December, A.D. 1878. 



XXII. — Sub-Examiner, appointed for December Intermediate Examination, dated 
the 18th day of December, A.D. 1878. 



135 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 





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43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 






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137 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



APPENDIX G. 

PROVINCIAL CERTIFICATES. 

(1.) Bt the Education Department. 

Second-Class Certificates granted to Students of the Normal Schools, hy Order in Council, dated 27th April, 1878. 



No. 



3974 
3975 
3976 
3977 
3978 
3979 
3980 
3981 
3982 
3983 
3984 
3985 
3980 
3987 
3988 
3989 
3990 
3991 
3992 
3993 
3994 
3995 
3996 
3997 
3998 
3999 
40u0 
4001 
4002 
4003 
4004 
4005 
4006 
4007 
4008 
4009 
4010 
4011 
4012 
4013 
4014 
4015 
4016 



Name. 



Thomas Beattie 

John R. Chisholm 

Andrew W. Gerrie 

Win. Martin Leigh 

William Linton 

John McCabe 

Alexander Skene 

Margaret Creighton .... 

Josephine Smith 

Thomas J. Collins 

Stephen K. Davidson . . . 

Moses G. Dippel 

Dilman K. Erb 

James Forbes 

George Jas. Gibb 

Albert D. Griffin 

Jacob B. Hagey 

Menno S. Hallman 

Colin Johnson 

Byron Jones ... .... 

Isaac W. Lucia ... 

Charles Miles 

James W. Orr 

James Phelan . . . 

W. James Robinson 

James Stirton 

George Stenernagel 

James Eugene Thompson 

Thos. R. Walmsley 

Elizabeth Brooks 

Barbara A. Cattanach 

Elizabeth Cusack 

S. Jane Dale 

Emma Clara Field 

Barbara Foote 

Kate Garnsey 

Christina B. Gordon .... 

Margaret E. Grey 

Isabella Hamilton 

Mary McColl 

Jannet Patterson 

Annie Sinclair 

.Jennie L. Sutherland . . . 



A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 



No. 



4017 
4018 
4019 
4020 
4021 
4022 
4023 
4024 
4025 
4026 
4027 
4028 
4029 
41130 
4031 
4032 
40i3 
4034 
4035 
4036 
4037 
4038 
4039 
4040 
404'. 
4042 
4043 
4044 
4045 
4046 
4047 
4048 
4049 
4050 
4051 
I 4052 
I 4053 
4054 
4055 
4056 
4057 
4058 



Name. 



WiHiam A. Toole 

George C. Blatchford. . 
Charles C. Hodgins . . . 
Charles Edwin Bell . 
Alexander R. Cochrane. 
William Chas. Allin . . . 

William Bickell 

William Bool 

Robert Bool 

Darius Dean 

Robert Chas. Dobbin . 
Humphrey T. Johnson 

John Kelly 

Joseph Law 

David Lent . 

John A. Murphy 

John McArthur 

George W. Sine 

George E. Sneath 

James C. Steele 

David M. Stewart 

Egerton J. Unger 

John Whaley . ... 
Thomas Young . . . . 

Ellen Calder 

Euphemia Campbell . . . 

Lucy E. Hinch 

Marion Livingstone . . . 

Angelina Myers 

Agnes McMurchie 

Annie C. Steacy 

Agnes Wilson 

Wm. A. Mclntyre 

! Charles Wm. Whyte . . . 

Alberta Jones 

Etta Mcllroy 

WilUam C. W. Bick . . . 

John H. Hobbs 

David A. Nesbit 

Eleazer T. Williams . . . 
Ida Morrison 



A 
B 
B 
A 
A 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B- 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
A 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
Carrie Traveller B 



Certificates granted hy Order in Council, dated 10th May, 1878. 
4059 i WiUiam G. Mills I A | [ 4060 | Margaret J. Henderson | A 

Certificates granted by Order in Council, dated \Oth May, 1878, to Students of the Toronto Normal School, wha 
were deprived of the standing awarded them at the Examination in July, 1877, but who subsequently passed 
the Examination, December, 1877. 



4061 
4062 
4063 
4064 
4065 



Isaac Lester Beattie 

Richard C. Cheeswright 

John A. Dale 

Alexander Dickie 

James E. Mabee 



B 


4066 


B 


4067 


B 


4068 


A 


4069 


A 





Douglas G. Storms . 
John D. Webster . 
George Wilkinson . , 
Henry E. Webster. 



138 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



Certificate granted hy Order in Council, 12th June, 1878. 



No. 


Name. 


3 


No. 


Name. 


2nd Class. 


4070 


Mary Jane Brown 


A 1 


1 







Certificates granted by Order in Council, 28fA June, 1878. 

4071 I Adam S. Bueglass I B 11 4073 I Lyman Welch ..., I B 

4072 I William F. Peters I B 1 1 | | 

Certificate granted by Order in Council, 9th July, 1878. 

4074 j Margaret Campbell ! B j | 

Certificates granted by Order in Council, 27th July, 1878, to Students who passed the Frofessiomd Examination 
at the Normal Schools, 25th, 26th, 27th, and 28th June. 



4075 
4076 
4077 
4078 
4079 
4080 
4081 
4082 
4083 
40S4 
4085 
4086 
4087 
4088 
4089 
4090 
4091 
4092 
4093 
4994 
4095 
41191) 
4097 
4(i98 
4099 
4100 



Charles Askwith 

Angus Bowie 

James Burns . 

Seymour Eaton 

Cunningham Moore 

Hugh Gr. Roberts ... 

John Anderson 

Jacob Donnenwerth 

Daniel David Ellis 

Edward ¥. Hixon | B 

Edward S. Holmes . . 

Alex. C. Irelan 

James G. Jones 

Samuel G King 

Kiernan Lynes . . 

Robert Munro 

Colin Alex. Scott 

.John Shearer I B 

Chas. Fred. Snelgrove 

Emma Austin . 

Sarah E. Biles 

Laura E. Briant 

Janet Davidson 

Jane Dingwall 

Marion Goodyear 

Kate A. Hardy . 



A 


4101 


A 


4102 


A 


4103 


A 


4104 


A 


1 4105 


A 


j 4106 


B 


1 4107 


B 


1 4108 


B 


4109 


B 


4110 


B 


4111 


B 


4112 


B 


4113 


B 


4114 


B 


4115 


B 


4116 


B 


4117 


B 


4118 


B 


4119 


B 


4120 


B 


4421 


B 


4122 


B 


4123 


B 


4124 


B 


4125 


B 


4126 



Mary Ludlow 

Maggie McCammon 

Maggie McKague 

Janet McNaughton 

Annie McPherson 

Isabella McVety 

Sat ah Margaret Scott 

Maggie Taylor 

Sarah Jane York 

Robert E. Harrison 

William Morrow . . . . 

Duncan Campbell 

Nicholas Graham .... . . 

Wra. Anthony Francis B. Jones 

Robert Lee Mortimer 

Samuel Neilly 

David A. Nesbit 

Moses G. Whitmer 

Marion Boyce 

Emma Field 

Bella Horsburgh 

Annie McCrimmon 

Jessie S. Mclntyre 

Susan E. Proctor 

Elizabeth Tilley 

Harriet Marion Wright 



B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
A 
A 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 

B 
B 
B 
B 



The following certificates are issued, valid for one year, to he permanently confirmed on evidence a yearns 

successful service. 



4127 
4128 
4129 
4130 
4131 



Henry Hoover 

Wm. Chas. Wesley Bick 

William Dawson 

.John Henry Hobbs .... 
Fred. Watson Hodgson 



A 1 


4132 


B 


4133 


B 


4134 


B 


4135 


B 





Mary E. Littlefield . . . . 
Florence E. McMullen . 

Ida Morrison 

Carrie Traveller 



Certificate granted by Order in Council, 31st July, 1878. 



4136 I Victoria Drury | B 1 1 

Certificates granted by Order in Council, IQth August, 1878. 



No. 


Name. 


. 1 

3 

1-C 


No. 


Name. 


S 

I-H 


4137 


Daniel B. Cornell 


A 
A 
A 
A 


4141 
4142 
4143 
4144 

1 


Robert .1. Tanner ... 


A 


41.38 


Martha E. Hunt 


A 


4139 


George Kirk 


Lottie E. Lawson 


A 


4140 


William Alford 


B 









139 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



No. 


Name. 




No. 


Name. 


1 
O 

I-H 


4145 




B 
B 
B 

B i 
B 

C 

C 

c 
c 


4154 
4155 
4156 
4157 
4158 
4159 
4160 
4161 
1 


George Sharman 


c 


4146 


Jno. Alexander Greig . 


Lafayette Welsh 


c 


4147 




James H. Wilson 


c 


4148 


Richard Seldon 


Sandford C. Woodworth 


c 


4149 


Eichard Shepherd 

Edward Charlton 

WUliam H. Colles 


Frances A. Cheyne 


c 


4150 




c 


4151 




c 


4152 


Peter McLean 


Mary Elizabeth Springer 


c 


4153 


Alexander McNeil 





4165 
4166 
4167 
4168 
4169 
4170 
4171 
4172 
4173 
.4174 
^4175 



4186 



4187 



4188 
4189 



4192 



4193 



4194 



Certificates granted hy Order in Council, 28th June, 1878. 

4162 I James C. Eraser | — i | 4163 | Eugene Richardson 

First-Class Certificate granted hy Order in Council, 2>Qth August, 1878. 
4164 ] Moore Armstrong | C j | 



Certificates granted by Order in Council, 23rd September, 1878. 



Thomas J. Walrond | A 

John Noble A 

Charles Miles A 

R. George Cavanagh ! A 

Menno S. Hallman | A 

Thomas Leonard A 

Albert D. Griffin | A 

John Lennox ; A 

Norman W. Ford ' A 

James S. Gilfillan ... B 

Kate Climie .... ; A 



Nellie Hodgson . . 
Amelia Waterson 
Maggie McKague 
Rebecca Munro . . 

Lide Hudson 

Ansley Smith . . . . 
John Park 



I 4176 
I 4177 
i 4178 

4179 

4180 
I 4181 
! 4182 

4183 ! Donald :\IcAlpine 

4184 

4185 



Archibald B. Wilson. 
Catharine Squair . . . 



B 
B 
A 
B 
B 
A 
B 
A 
B 
B 



Certificate granted by Order in Council, 19th October, 1878. 
Edwin Alfred Chapman ] B ! | 

Certificate granted by Order in Council, 2nd November, 1878. 
William Irwin ! A 1 1 

Certificates granted by Order in Council, 12th November, 1878. 



William E. Cowan I B 

Stephen Kelso Davidson | A 



4190 I William C. B. Murray. 

4191 Frederick A. CuU 



Certificate granted by Order in Council, IZth November, 1878. 
Maggie H. Dixon I B j | 

Certificate granted by Order in Council, 21st November, 1878. 
Margaret McArthur i A | 

Certificates granted by Order in Council, Gth December, 1878. 
Minnie Plumb | B 11 4195 | Sarah Wilkinson . . . . 



140 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



10 



(jq^CvI^ ■ iM Sq i-l CO W ■* i-H T-i ■V <N OO lO lO 00 (M IC r-i 1-1 e<l C<1 i-l iM <M <M <N •* 



O0CC»OO •C«5'*Ot^O:(MCCt^tOOOO -Or-HOl'lMCiOiO ■ -^ O C^ <Z> '^ •■*"M 

i-li-li-ir-lrtO<l <Mr-l ■•Ot(MTt"r-l(M i-HtHi-Ii-It-I -i-HN 



rH,-H i-ii-HrH iHT-l(M--(MS<]TrrHrt r' 

























iH • 


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1-1 


-C-1 











o 



T-IN50C0ir;iCt-C<;Q0iHC0b->-ilOQ0OC0r-IC5OM:0'*-^:200t>e<HCCCOCViO'Nb- 
t-jr5t>.«ae005«0(MOOOOC501r-Cl50»Ot-.rHrrC:^0'MsCiOCOOOOt^lMmOC<rOi 
T-l i-ItH rH iH in 1-1 1-1 1-i 1-1 i-li-l 



It- (M (M C^ . CC 



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< 



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OJ r O) 

5 S.3 



i^ml-g 



05 J= ^ -^ 

O jj r^ ?5 fj ^ "^ u^ 



ZU "-! T^ rt 



(U ^ t- Oi O) 



141 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



Is 






O00CC»0S5C<JOC5O 
lOCOCOC<5C<ICO<MOOO 



(M 1— I »0 >ft C5 ^^ 00 
C^l rH iH T-H I— I I— I 1— I 



O 



t~ t:~ N ^ "-" W l^ 



T-ic<n>.t^ccr:i-ioo 



i-l r-l r-1 tH 7^ (M C: lO 



K^ 



S X S: 5 
_ 3 o S - 



142 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



(3.) Total Number of Persons who applied for and who obtained Certificates from 1871 to 

1878, inclusive. 





Number who applied for 


Who received 


YEAR. 


1st 
Class. 


2nd 

Class. 


3rd 

Class. 


Total. 


1st Class. 


2nd Class. 


3rd Class. 






Male. 


Female. 


Male. Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


1871 


34 


608 


3091 


3733 


16 


— 


211 75 


746 


798 


IS-IG 


1872 


55 


659 


3339 


4053 


12 


2 


204 67 


701 


996 


1982 


1873 


36 


455 


3142 


3633 


8 


— 


118 


46 


699 


960 


1831 


1874 


27 


432 


2039 


2498 


14 


— 


143 


53 


435 


654 


1299 


1875 


46 


709 


3124 


3879 


20 


— 


188 


90 


654 


979 


1931 


1876 


76 


831 


3580 


4487 


9 


2 


85 


39 


792 


876 


1803 


1877 


38 


1380 


4870 


6288 


13 


3 


139 


103 


720 


827 


1805 


1878 


60 


1125 


3494 


4679 


20 


6 


175 


115 


571 


557 


1444 


Total 


372 


6199 


26679 


33250 


112 


13 


1263 


588 


5318 


6647 


13941 



APPENDIX H. 

Inspectors', High School Masters' and Examiners' Certificates, and 

Retired Teachers. 

Appointments during 1878 hy Order in Council (continued from Rejwrt of 1877 ). 



I. — Names of Persons who have received Inspectors' Certificates during 1878. 



Note. — All Inspectors will be ex-officio Members of the Boards of Examiners for their 
respective Counties. 



Campbell, Rev. John, B. A. 


Johnson, Hugh D. 


.Scott, R. G.,B.A. 


Carlyle, Alexander, B.A. 


Kirk, George. 


Somerville, Geo. H. 


Carlyle, James, M.D. 


Mitchell, F. L., B.A. 


Sprague, W. E. 


Cowell, D. B. 


McCulloch, Andrew, B.A. 


Switzer, P. A., M.A. 


Curry, Charles D., B.A. 


Macgregor, C. J., M.A. 


Tamblyn, Wm. W., M.A. 


Givens, D. A., B.A 


McGregor, R C, B.A. 


TurnbuU, James. M.A. 


Grant, Rev. George, B.A. 


McMillan, J., B.A. 


Turner, Robert J. 


Henderson, John, B.A. 


Nattress, William. 


Tytler, William, B.A. 


Hunter, John. 


Panton, J. H., B.A. 





II. — Names op Persons who have received High School Masters' Certificatm 

during 1878. 



Asselstine, Henry A. , B. A. 
Givens, David A., B.A. 
Hamilton, John A., B.A. 



Hooper, Thomas H., B.A. 
McCulloch, Andrew, B.A. 



143 



Pollock, James E., B.A. 
Steele, Alexander, B.A. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



III — Names of Persons who hate received Examiners' Certificates 

DURING 1878. 



Arnold, Rev. R., B.A. 


Johnson, Hugh D. 




Somerville, George H. 


Belt, Rev. WilUam, M.A. 


Johnston, Adam, B.A. 




Sprague, W. E. 


Carl vie, Alexander, B.A. 


Manley, Charles. 




Switzer, P. A., M.A. 


Carman, .James A., B.A. 


McCuHoch, Andrew, B. 


A. 


Steele, Alexander, B.A. 


CorneU, D. B. 


McGregor, P. C, B.A. 




Tamblyn, William W., M.A. 


Ferguson, Miles. 


McKOlopp, Alexander, 


B.A. 


Telford. W. R. 


Grant, Robert. 


McLurg, James. 




Turnbuil, James, M.A. 


Gibson, W. J., B.A. 


MacPherson, Crawford. 




Turner, Robert J. 


Givens, David A., B.A. 


Nattress, William. 




Tytler, William, B.A. 


Hallett, William J. 


Panton, J. H., B.A. 




Whillans, Rev. Robert, B.A. 


Hunter, John. 


Peters, George. 







lY. — Teachers retired from the Profession during 1878. 



No. 



NAjME. 



COUNTY. 



87] 

872 I 

873 I 
874 

875 ' 

876 1 

877 ! 

878 I 

879 I 

880 j 
881 
882 
883 
884 
885 
886 
887 
888 
889 
890 
891 
892 
893 
894 
895 
896 
897 
898 
899 
900 
901 
902 
903 
904 
905 
906 
907 
908 
909 
910 
911 
912 
913 
914 
915 
916 
917 
918 



Atkinson, F. C 

Anderson, .John J . . . . 

Arthur, E. C 

Ansell, George W . . . , 

BeU, Thomas 

Bingham, H 

Bouck, R. M 

Boyle, W. H 

Broadway, A 

Buchner, Denis 

Backus, Lorenzo .... 

Bau'd, George M 

Black, J. L 

Berry, F. N 

Bright, E.J 

Buchner, Denis C 

Bell, G. A 

Clapp, R. E 

Conacher, James J. . 

Coughlin, Daniel 

Carey, Alfred W 

Cameron, Angus 

Conron, Matthew B . . 
Cameron, Angus . . . 

Cavell, William 

Clay, Henry 

Crawford, James . . . 

Campbell, John 

Cruthers, Samuel . . . . 

Cameron, M. L 

Conron, Wm. J 

Caswell, A. K 

Campbell, Alex 

Donahue, Denis J . . . . 

Durant, Noah 

Dougherty, John . . . , 

Duff, James 

DeCantillon, Patrick 

Drinnan, Robert 

Ellis, George 

Elliott, James J 

Ellis, Matthew H. . . . 

Elliott, William .... 

Farron, Asher 

Freeman, George E . 

Ferguson, Robert 

Eraser, Joseph C. . . . 

Fowler, Henry 



York 

Wellington 

Northumberland 

Leeds 

Lambton 

Durham 

Dundas . . 

Wentworth . , . 

Oxford 

York 

Kent 

Kent 

Renfrew 

York 

Middlesex 

Norfolk 

Leeds .... 

York 

Wentworth 

Middlesex 

Kent 

Bruce 

Bruce 

Bruce 

York 

Elgin .... ..... 

Perth 

Ontario 

Simcoe 

Kent 

Bruce 

Wellington 

Simcoe 

York 

Prescott 

Haldimand 

Grey 

Huron . 

Simcoe 

Leeds 

Wentworth 

Durham 

Victoria 

Bruce 

Perth 

Huron 

Wentworth . . . . 

Victoria 



Amount returned 
and date. 



5 cts. 1878. 

6 00 .January. 

2 00 February. 

3 00 March. 

6 00 ... October. 

5 00 January. 

i 4 00 ... . .January. 

9 00 February. 

6 00 February. 

2 00 February. 

13 00 March. 

2 00 .... March. 

6 00 March. 

7 00 April. 

I 00 May. 

9 00 June. 

1 00 June. 

5 00 August. 

1 00 .January. 

4 00 February. 

4 00 February. 

5 00 March. 

10 00 March. 

(J 0) March. 

1 00 March. 

2 00 March. 

4 00 April. 

10 00 April. 

10 00 August. 

12 00 October. 

9 00 November. 

6 00 November. 

9 00 December. 

4 00 December. 

8 00 .... March. 

7 00 ^lay. 

2 00 .... June. 

8 00 June. 

75 00...... Jul V. 

II 00 August. 

84 00 March. 

4 00 .June. 

2 00 June. 

7 00 December. 

4 00 .January. 

5 00 January. 

7 00 January. 

3 00 February. 

9 00 March. 



144 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



IV. — Teachers retired from the Profession during 1878. — Continued. 



NAME. 



Fletcher, Frank , 

Fraser, W. H 

Frederick, Samuel 

Fraser, Hugh 

Fish, George 

Frost, R. S 

Foster, Thomas 

Green, Charles V 

Garland, Absalom 

GiU, H. W 

Graham, Robert H ... 

Graham, Edward 

Goodbow, Henry, deceased 

Gray, .James 

Gardiner, J. H . 

German, W. J 

Greenaway, Charles 

Giflford, W. E 

Galbraith, L , 

Howe, George J 

Houston, William, deceased 

Hough, J. W 

Hardie, L. F 

Hall, George , 

Hanna, J. Wesley 

Hutt, Robert A 

Hagen, Robert A , 

Hales, George 

Island, Robert L 

Ingram, John 

Ireland, E. S 

Jenkins, H. W 

Johnson, .J. R , 

James, Moses A 

Jordan, Thomas 

Johnson, Sanford 

Kemp, Clifford 

Kaufman, Menno ... 

Luton, Alfred 

Lyall, Thomas F 

Lauder, Walter 

Lounds, George 

Lane, Isaac L 

Lawson, James 

Martin, Joseph 

Moir, Robert 

Markle, V. A 

Meldrum, Andrew 

Moore, Alfred H 

Melady, Thomas 

Mooney, W 

Montgomery, Samuel L 

Mav, John 

Matthews, B. F 

Monkman, J. G. L 

Meldrum, Jno. A 

Menzies, Duncan 

McBride, John 

McArdle, David 

McDonald, Alex., deceased 

McFarlane, D 

Mcllvanie, Samuel . . 

McDowell, J. W 

McPherson, John 

McLean, Peter 

McLean, John C , 

McPhillips, H. T 

McLean, Allan , 



COUNTY. 



Amovmt returned 
and date. 



Hastings j 2 

York 6 

Middlesex 11 

Oxford 3 

York 6 

Middlesex 10 

Victoria 6 

York 3 

Carleton ... 13 

Simcoe 3 

Peel 11 

Wentworth 4 

Perth 2 

York 7 

Carlet()n 1 

Hastings 

Middlesex 3 

Kent 6 

Essex 9 

Prince Edward ... 8 

Lanark 6 

Northumberland .... 6 

Bruce 1 

Frontenac 12 

Leeds . 5 

Lincoln 15 

Huron 4 

Durham 5 

Wellington 7 

Huron 6 

Noi-thumberland . 

Grey 

Lanark 

Durham 

Grey . 

Hastings 

Northumberland . 

Perth 

Grey. 

Wentworth 

Simcoe 

Simcoe 

Dundas 

Leeds 

Carleton 

Frontenac 

Northumberland . 

Huron 

Carleton 

Lambton 

Huron 

Simcoe 

Simcoe 

Welland 

Peel 

Wellington 

Bruce 

York , 

York 

Lanark 

Perth 

Grey 

Grey 

Victoria 

York 

Wellington 

York 

York 

145 



cts. 187J 

00 ... March. 
00 ... June. 

00 July. 

00 September. 

00 October. 

00 November. 

00 December. 

00 January. 

00 January. 

00 January. 

00 ... . January. 

00 March. 

64 April. 

00 , . May. 
00 .... June. 

00 June. 

00... . August. 

00 September. 

00 October. 

00 January. 

31 March. 

00 May. 

00 June. 

00 June. 

00 June. 

00 .... October. 

00 November. 

00 December. 

00 March. 

00 April. 

00 April. 

00 March. 

00 May. 

00 August. 

00 December. 

00 December. 

00 March. 

50 November. 

00 March. 

00 March. 

00 May. 

00 June. 

00 July. 

00 August. 

00 February. 

00 February. 

00 February. 

00 March. 

00 March. 

00 March. 

00 June. 

00 July. 

00 July. 

00 Auguit. 

00 October. 

00 October. 

00 December. 

00 January. 

00 January. 

28 January. 

00 January. 

00 January. 

00 February. 

00 February. 

00 February. 

00 February. 

00 March. 

00 April. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



IV.— Teachers retired prom the Profession during 1878. — Continued. 



No. 



987 
988 
989 
990 
991 
992 
993 
994 
995 
996 
997 
998 
999 
1000 
1001 
1002 
1003 
]004 
1005 
1006 
1007 
1008 
1009 
1010 
1011 
1012 
1013 
1014 
1015 
1016 
1017 
10] 8 
1019 
1020 
1021 
1022 
1023 
1024 
1025 
1026 
1027 
1028 
1029 
1030 
1031 
1032 
1033 
1034 
1035 
1036 
1037 
1038 
1039 
1040 
1041 
1042 
1043 
1044 
1045 
1046 
1047 
1048 
1049 
1050 
1051 
1052 
1053 
1054 



NAME. 



McKibbin, Archibald, deceased . . 

McCabe, John 

Mclntyre, Peter C 

McKay, Diigald . . 

MacLean, Dan. D 

McTavish, Wm. S 

McCallum, Archibald 

McKay, D. W 

McMillan, Duncan 

McMurray, Alexander 

McKibbin, J. H 

Mo Arthur, Alex. P 

McKenzie, Alexander 

McFadden, Moses .... 

Nero, D. V. A 

Nighswandei-, David B 

Nesbitt, Arthur K 

Orr, Wm. H 

O'Shea, James F 

Odium, John 

O'Reilly, Owen M 

Pringle, Allan F 

Peine, Louis 

Post, W. H 

Palmer, J. H 

Popham, E. S 

Pettit, E. B . . 

Quinn, William 

Robertson, Dugald 

Redick, Frederick 

Robinson, Templeton C 

Reid, JohnT 

Ross, John W 

Robinson, Ed. B 

Relyea, Wm. T. O. G., deceased . 

Rose, Henry . . 

Rutherford, Alexander 

Rose, David 

Scott, William 

Simmons, William 

Smith, W. E 

Stafford, John , 

Sproule, Chas. E 

Symons, Wm. H 

Scott, Elizabeth 

Skelton, Jeremiah 

Sanderson, Joseph 

Stoddart, James 

Stephen, J 

Skinner, D. Spencer 

Switzer, Chas. W 

Shaw, John E 

Sheppard, Ed. E . 

Stilwell, R., Jun 

Spence, James 

Smith, Edward S., deceased 

Sadd, George C 

Sinclair, D. Franklin, deceased . . 

Sinclair, John Neil 

Shanks, David 

Stenebaugh, Philip S 

Stacey, F. B. . . . 

Smiley, George 

Stout, William 

Todd, James 

Thomas, C. M. S. 

Tennant, David H 

Tibbs, R. C 



COUNTY. 



Prince Edwai'd . . 

Kent 

Lanark 

Simcoe 

Elgin 

Halton 

Bruce 

Middlesex 

Middlesex 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Bruce 

Wentworth 

Perth 

Essex 

York 

Algoma 

Peterborough . . . . 
Peterborough . . . 

Huron 

Carleton 

York 

Waterloo 

Prince Edward . 

Grey 

Carleton 

Norfolk , . 

Grey 

Wellington ... 

Hastings 

Grey 

Wentworth 

Huron 

Norfolk 

Stormont 

Lanark 

Carleton 

Norfolk 

Simcoe 

Huron 

Bruce 

Oxford 

Prescott 

Northumberland 

Lanark 

Wellington 

Peterborough . . . . 

Wentworth 

Peterborough 

Perth 

Peel. .. 

Kent 

Elgin 

Middlesex 

Wellington 

Waterloo 

Essex 

Kent 

Kent 

Bruce . 

Brant 

Elgin 

Carleton 

Bruce 

York , 

Essex 

Middlesex 

Wentworth ... . . 



Amount returned 
and date. 



$ cts. 1878. 

29 56 April. 

10 00 May. 

12 00 ... May. 

11 00 June. 

4 00 June. 

5 00 June. 

6 00.... July. 

6 00 July. 

6 00 July. 

6 00 August. 

12 00 August. 

8 00 . ... September. 
15 00. ... October. 

5 00 October. 

6 00 .... March. 

7 00 April. 

3 00 Septemljer. 

6 00 May. 

8 00 July. 

4 00 July. 

9 00 August. 

13 00 . . . . March. 

6 00 May. 

7 00 June. 

10 GO June. 

2 00 .... October. 

7 00 December. 

10 00 ... December. 

7 00 February. 

5 00 February.. 

9 00 .... April. 

10 00 May. 

5 00 June. 

6 00 August. 

2 42 August. 

6 00 September. 

3 00 September. 

8 00 November. 

8 00 January. 

7 00 January. 

2 00 January. 

4 00 February. 

4 00 February. 

10 00.... February. 
74 00 ... .March. 
13 00 March. 

12 00 March. 

4 00 March. 

5 00 .... April. 

5 00 May. 

7 00 May. 

8 00 June. 

4 00. . . June. 
2 00... .July. 

6 00 September. 

17 98 September. 

10 00 October. 

11 68 October. 

6 00 November. 

7 00 December. 

11 00 December. 

2 00 December. 

13 00 December. 

12 00 December. 

3 00 January. 

2 00 Janu»ry. 

10 00.. ..ApriL 
7 00 AprU. 



146 



43 Victoria. 



Sesoional Papers (No. 5.) 



A. 1880 



IV. — Teachers retired from the Profession during 1878. — Concluded. 



No. 


NAME. 


COUNTY. 


Amount returned 
and date. 


1055 
1056 


Tracy, John A 

Voaden, Thomas 


Bruce 

Haldimand . . 


$ cts. 1878. 

6 00 June. 

2 00 January. 

12 00 .J anuary . 

8 00... ..January. 

27 34 February. 

13 00 February. 

12 00 February. 

5 00 February. 

27 93 April. 

5 00 April. 

5 00 April. 

100 ...July. 
4 00 March 


1057 
1058 


Warren, Edward 

Winterton, Thomas ..... 

Williams, Edward, deceased 

Walker, John A 

Walsh, D. F 

Wood, W. D . . .. 


York 

Peel 


1059 
1060 
1061 


Carleton . . 

Wentworth 


1062 


Wellington .... 

Essex 


1063 


Williams, Horatio J. , deceased . . . 

Willmot, J. W 

Woods, John L 

Willmot, J. _W 

Young, David 

York.H.M . 


1064 


York 


1065 
1066 
1067 


Wellington 

Peel 

W^entworth 


1068 




5 00 August. 







APPENDIX L. 
List of High and Public School Inspectors. 



1. High School Inspectors. 
James A. McLellan, M.A. LL.D. ; J. M. Buchan, M.A.; S. Arthur Marling, M.A. 



2. Public School Inspeotobs. 



NAME. 



Donald McDiarmid, M.D, 
Alexander McNaughton . , 

Ai'thur Bi-own 

Thomas Orton Steele 

Rev. Thomas Garrett 

Rev. John May, M.A 

Rev. George Blair, M.A. . 

William R. Bigg 

Robert Kinney, M. D. . . . 
Henry Lloyd Slack, M.A. 
R. G. Scott, B. A , 

John Agnew, M.D 

Frederick Burrows 

Gilbert D. Piatt, B.A. .. 

William Mackintosh 

John Johnston 

Edward Scarlett 

John J. Tilley 

James Coyle Brown 

C. D. Curry, B.A 

James H. Knight 

Henry Reazin 

James McBrien 

James Hodgson 

David Fotheringham 



JURISDICTION. 



Glengarry 

Stormont 

Dundas 

Prescott 

Russell 

Carleton 

Grenville and Town of Prescott 

Leeds, No. 1, and Town of Brockville 

Leeds, No. 2 

Lanark and Town of Perth 

Renfrew, Town of Pembroke, and District 

of Nipissing 

Frontenac 

Lennox and Addington and Town of Napanee 

Prince Edward 

Hastings, No. 1 

Hastings, No. 2, and City of Belleville 

Northumberland and Town of Cobourg. ... 
Durham and Towns of Bowmanville and 

Port Hope 

Peterborough 

Haliburton 

E. Victoria and Town of Lindsay 

W. Victoria 

Ontario 

S. York 

N. York 



POST OFFICE. 



Athol. 

Newington. 

Morrisburg. 

L'Orignal. 

Bearbrook. 

Ottawa. 

Prescott. 

Brockville. 

Farmersville. 

Perth. 

Pembroke. 

Kingston. 

Napanee. 

Picton. 

Madoc. 

Belleville. 

Cobourg. 

Bowmanville. 

Peterborough. 

Minden. 

Lindsay. 

Lindsay. 

Myrtle. 

Yorkville. 

Aurora. 



147 



48 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 5. 



A. 1880 



2.— Public School Inspectors. 



NAME. 



JURISDICTION. 



Donald J. ]\IcKinnon 

Rev. William McKee, B. A 

James C. Morgan, M. A 

Robert Little 

Joseph H. Smith 

Michael Joseph Kelly, M.D . . . 

John B. Somerset 

James H. Ball, M.A 

Clarke Moses 

James J. Wadsworth, M.A., M.B 
William Carlyle 

Thomas Pierce 

David P. Clapp, B.A 

George A. Somerville 

Thomas Gordon 

William Ferguson 

Andrew Grier 

William Alexander 

John M. Moran 

John R. Miller 

Archibald Dewar 

W. S. Clendening 

Alexander Campbell 

John Dearness 

Joseph S. Carson 

A. P. Butler 

Edmund B. Harrison 

Wilmot M. Nichols, B.A 

Charles A. Barnes 

John Brebner 

Theodule Girardot . 

D. A. Maxwell 

P. A. Switzer, B.A 

James Hughes 

W. McCabe, LL.B 

W. G. Kidd 

J. B. Boyle 

John C. Glashan 

James B. Grey ... 

Rev. A. McCoU 

Rev. Robert Rodgers 

R. B. Carman, M.A 

Rev. James Herald 

Rev. Robert Torrance 

John Rogers . . 

Rev. Thomas Henderson 

James Stratton 

J. M. Piatt, M.D 

G. W. Ross, M.P 

John McLean. 

Rev. George Bell, LL.D 

Thomas Hilliard 

Richard Harcourt, B.A., M.P. P. . 

G. A. Somerville 

J. C. Patterson, M.P 



Peel and To\vn of Brampton 

S. Simcoe 

N. Simcoe and Towns of Barrie and Orillia . . 

Haltou and Towns of Milton and Oakville 

Wentworth 

Brant and City of Brantford 

Lincoln 

Welland and Towns of Clif t(jn and Thorold . 

Haldimand ... 

Norfolk and Town of Simcoe . . . 

Oxford and Towns of Ingersoll, Tilsonburg 
and Woodstock 

Waterloo and Towns of Berlin and Gait 

N. Wellington and Towns of Harriston and 
Mount Forest 

S. WoPington and Town of OrangeviUe 

W. Grey and Town of Owen Sound 

S. Grey and To^vn of Durham 

E. Grey 

N. Perth and Towns of Listowel, Palmers- 
ton and Stratford 

S. Perth, Towns of ISIitchell and St. Mary's . 

S. Huron and Town of Goderich 

N. Huron & Towns of Clinton & Seaforth . . 

E. Briice 

W. Bruce and Town of Kincardine 

E. Middlesex 

W. Middlesex 

Elgin 

E. Kent and Town of Bothwell 

W.Kent 

Lambton, No. 1, and Town of Petrolea. . 

Lambton, No. 2, and Town of Sarnia 

Essex, No. 1, and Towns of Sandwich and 
Amherstburgh 

Essex, No 2 

District of Algoma and Parry Sound 

City of 



POST OFFICE. 




Brampton. 

Alliston. 

Barrie. 

Acton. 

Ancaster. 

Brantford. 

St. Catharines. 

Thorold. 

Caledonia — Seneca. 

Simcoe. 

Woodstock. 
Berlin. 

Harriston. 
Gueljjh. 
Owen Sound. 
Priceville. 
Thombury. 

Stratford. 

Stratford. 

Goderich. 

Seaforth. 

Walkerton. 

Kincardine. 

London. 

Strathroy. 

St. Thomas. 

Ridgetown. 

Rondeau. 

Forest. 

Sarnia. 

Sandwich. 
Amherstburgh. 
Elora. 
Toronto. 
Hamilton. 
Kingston. 
London. 
Ottawa. 
St. Catharines. 
Chatham. 
Collingwood and 
Cornwall. [Meaf 1. 
Dundas. 
Guelph. 
Niagara. 

Paris, (address Brant- 
Peterborough, [ford). 
Picton. 
Strathroy. 
St. Thomas. 
Walkerton. 
Waterloo. 
Welland. 

^Vhitby and Oshawa. 
Windsor. 



148 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (Xo. 5.) A. 1880 



ERRATA. 



On page 140— Nos. "4162" and "4163" are Second Class Certificates. 
On page 140— Nos. "4165" to "4195" are Second Class Certificates. 



149 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



EEPOET 



OF THE 



IMMIGRATION DEPARTMENT 



FOR THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO, 



FOR THE YEAR 



1879. 



$xmM itj (DnUr oi tltc iJeglsiUtU^^ gisi^cmbltt. 




PRINTED BY C. BLACKETT ROBINSON, 5 JORDAN STREET. 

1880, 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. 1880 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Commissioner's Eeport iii. 

Report of Mr. Peter Byrne, Outaiio Agent, London, England T 

Eeport of L. Stafford, Dominion Agent, Quebec 3 

Report of Edwin Clay, Dominion Agent, Halifax 7 

Report of Richard M. Persse, Ontario Agent, Quebec 9 

Report of W. J. Willis, Dominion Agent, Ottawa... 21 

Report of R. Macplierson, Dominion Agent, Kingston 23 

Report of John A. Donaldson, Dominion Agent, Toronto 27 

Report of John Smith, Dominion Agent, Hamilton ; 32 

Report of A. G. Smyth, Domiuim A.gent, London 45 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. 1880 



REPORT 



COMMISSIONER OF IMMIGRATION 



YEAR ENDING SIst DECEMBER, 1879. 



To Ills Honour the Honourable D. A. Macdoxald, Lieutenant-Governor of tlie Province 

of Ontario. 

Mat it Please Your Honour : 

The undersigned has the honour to submit the following Report of the operations of 
the Depai'tment of Immigration for the year ending 31st December, 1879. 

As anticipated in the Report of 1878, immigration from Europe increased largely in 
1879. The severe distress prevailing in the British Islands, led many to sever tlieir con- 
nection with the land of their fathers and seek homes in the new Avorld. Many of these 
people landed on our shores destitute, and without the necessary qualifications to ensure 
immediate success in a Province like Ontario. It is gratifying, however, to find that 
most of them have already found employment of some kind, while all the farm labour- 
ers have been settled with very little trouble. There has been a great decrease in the 
arrival of domestic servants owing to the withdrawal of the £2 .5s. fare by the Domin- 
ion, and of the bonus by tfie Ontario Government. 

The experience of 1847, the year of the Iri.sh famiue, when 70,000 people landed 
in this country with the intention of making Canada their home, leads to the belief that 
large numbers will find their way to this Province during the curi'ent year. It cannot 
therefore, be too often reiterated in the ears of clerks, grocers, dry-goods men, and other 
persons seeking light employment, that there is no present work for them in Ontario, 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. 1880 

■while the labour market for mechanics is overstocked. Tenant farmers, farm labourers, 
and female domestic servants are still sought for. 

Early in the Spring of 1879, the Department of Agriculture at Ottawa was notitied 
that this Province would, in future, bear no portion of the cost of conveying immigrants 
arriving at Montreal, Portland or Halifax, to Ontario, and tliat this department desired to 
be in a position co discriminate as to the persons to whom free passes should be given from 
Quebec to agencies in this Province. An arrangement having been made with the 
Dominion Government to that effect, Mr. R. M. Persse was sent to Quebec on the 25th 
of June with instructions to restrict free passes to farm labourers and female domestic 
servants. His report will be found in appendix B. 

On the 10th iNovember last, I notified the Hon. the Minister of Agriculture, Ottawa, 
that it was not the intention of the Ontario Government to renew the arrangement entered 
into at Otttawa, in November, 1874, by the various Provinces of the Dominion, by 
which this Province agreed to pay $5,500 annually to the Dominion for services by its 
af^ents. The discontinuance of this arrangement will etTect a considerable saving in the 
expenditure in Europe on account of Immigration. 

During the Fall of 1879 several delegates, representing a large number of British 
and Irish farmers, visited this country with a view of reporting on its resources and suit- 
ability as a field of immigration for farmers with some means. On their arrival in On- 
tario I caused such arrangements to be made as woukl enable them to visit the difierent 
sections of the Province. It is gratifying to learn that they were most favourably im- 
pressed with the Dominion at large, but especially with our Province. On their 
return to their respective counties they published reports of their visit which excited 
great interest among the farming community of Great Britain and Ireland. Extracts 
from their speeches were published and commented upon by almost every newspaper in 
Britain. It is expected tliat the information thus diffused in Great Britain will cause 
many farmers to transfer their capital and skill to Ontario, where they can become lords 
of the soil they cultivate. High rents, bad seasons, and foreign supply do not tend to 
the prosperity of the British farmer, and it is more than probable that many will find 
that by moving from the heart of the empire to its outlying provinces, they will better 
their circumstances. It is true that seasons may be more propitious, and that rents may be 
lowered, but it is inevitable in the future that British corn markets will be largely sup- 
plied from foreign fields, and British meat markets from fondgn pastures. 

With the marked improvement in steam navigation and railway communication of 
recent years, the limited agi'icultural capabilities of Great Britain can scarcely be expected 
to compete successfully'with the vast and fertile fields of Canada and the United States in 
Ihe production of the staple articles of agriculture. 

With a view of further supplying the demand for information respecting Ontario 
which exists among British farmers, I have caused thirty thousand copies of a pamphlet to 
be published for distribution in the British Islands. The information contained in this 
pamphlet has been collected with care from every part of the Province, and it contains 
information on subjects relating to Ontario that cannot be obtained from other available 
sources. 

iv. 



48 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. IbBO 



The arrivals at Quebec in 1878 and 1879, respectively, were as follows : — 

1878 — Steerage passengers, 7,929 ; Cabin, 2,329 10,258 

1879 — Steerage passengers, 14,861 ; Cabin, 2,380 17,241 

Increase in 1879 6,983 

The Steerage adult passengers were classified on the ship lists as follows : — 

Farmers 340 

Labourers . 7,118 

Mechanics 923 

Clerks and tradeis 12 

8,393 

Total arrivals at Halifax in 1879 3,955 

Total arrivals at Quebec in 1879 17,241 

Total arrivals at Halifax and Quebec 21,196 

Total arrivals at Halifax and Quebec in 1878 12,788 

Increase in 1879 8,408 

The following is a statement of the number of immigrants settled in the Province of 
Ontario, through the Ottawa, Kingston, Toronto, Hamilton, and London Agencies, with 
their nationalities, during the years 1876, 1877, 1878, and 1879, respectively : — 

Irish. German. Other Countries. Total. 

1,266 654 2,736 11,432 

1,310 756 3,335 11,654 

1,551 620 2,975 13,055 

3,993 1,450 3,901 24,407 

The above table shews an increase of 11,352 in; favour of 1879, as compared with 
1878. 

The total arrivals in, and departures from Ontario, in 1878 and 1879, respectively, 

were as follows : — 

Passed 
Via St. Lawretice. United States. Total Arrivals, through the Province. Eemained in Ontario. 

1878—10,069 12,741 22,810 9,735 13,055 

1879—20,432 21,990 42,422 18,015 24,407 



Year. 


English. 


Scotch 


1876. 


5,722 


1,054 


1877. 


4,891 


1,362 


1878. 


6,124 


1,785 


1879. 


12,169 


2,894 



Increase in 1879 11,352 

V. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. 1880 



The immigrants settled in this Pro\dnce during the years 1877, 1878, and 1879, were 
distributed through its respective Agencies, as follows : — 

Year. Ottawa. Kingston. Toronto. Hamilton. London. Total. 

1877. 431 743 2,534 6,590 1,356 11,654 

1878. 416 746 4,602 6,348 943 13,055 

1879. 608 1,134 9,-509 10,639 2,517 24,407 

In addition to the above immigrants, the following numbers were repoi'ted through 
the Customs, as having arrived and settled in Ontario : — 







1876. 


1877. 


1878. 


1879. 


Ottawa, and 


ports within its Agency . . , 


, . 1,665 


1,029 


842 


768 


Kingston 


(( a 


. 1,521 


1,770 


649 


566 


Toronto 


u a 


. 1,802 


1,412 


837 


716 


Hamilton 


U (( 


313 




674 


959 


London 


a a 


. 2,390 


2,014 


1,883 


1,411 






7,691 


6,225 


4,885 


4,420 



Decrease in 1879, through Customs. . . . 465 

Table A shews the monthly, quarterly, and yearly arrivals at, and departures from, 
the various Agencies, the nationalities of those settled in this Province, and the grand 
totals of 1878 and 1879, respectively. 

The following statement shews the number of emigrants who left the British Islands 
for places out of Europe, and the percentage settled in Ontario, through Agencies, during 
the years 1874, 1875, 1876, 1877, 1878, and 1879, respectively: — 



Year. 


Numbers Left. 


Settled in Ontario. 


Pe 


rcentage. 


1874. 


241,014 


25,444 




10-55 


1875. 


173,809 


17,655 




10-16 


1876. 


138,222 


11,432 




8-27 


1877. 


119,971 


11,654 




9-77 


1878. 


147,663 


13,055 




8-84 


1879. 


214,430 


24,407 




11-38 



VI. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



The following statement shews the aggregate numbei^ of children settled in this Pro- 
vince since 18G8, through the undermentioned parties. 



YEAR. 


Miss 
Rye. 


Miss 
Macpherson. 


Miss 
Bilbroiigh. 


Mr. 

Middlemore. 


Rev. Mr. 
Stephenson. 


Total. 


1868 


5 
187 
25.3 
277 
18o 
1.34 
193 










5 


18r,9 






187 


1870 


194 
493 
321 
3.58 
279 
184 
163 
115 
68 
95 






447 


1871 


102 
50 
78 
71 
83 
86 
57 




775 


1872 . . . 




506 


1873 




594 


1874 


81 
4.3 


603 


2875 . . . 




305 


1876 




234 


1877 


91 
42 
96 




23 
32 
24 


317 


1878 

1879 


79 
126 


307 
398 






Total .. . 


1,463 


2,275 


205 


527 


208 


4,678 



The number of farm-labourers and female domestic servants brought out through this 
Department, including their families, in 1878 and 1879, were as follows : — 

1878. 1879. 

Farm-labourers 126 199 

Female domestic servants 155 37 

The decrease in the number of servant girls was owing to the withdrawal of a special 
rate by the Dominion and of the bonus by the Ontario Government. 

EXPEXDITURE. 

The total expenditure on account of Immigration, during the years 1877, 1878, and 
1879 respectively, was as follows : 

1877. 1878. 1879. 

Agencies in Europe $8,018 08 $7,651 10 $7,955 46 

Agencies in Canada 2,64-9 16 2,618 38 2,295 72 

Dominion Government proportion 

of carriage from Quebec 21,239 62 7,139 32 7,000 00 

Carriage of Immigrants in Ontario. 4,96187 4,817 94 8,944 48 

Provisions for Immigrants, includ- 
ing medical attendance 5,599 08 5,610 38 :, 1,720 57 

vii. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



1877. 1878. 1879. 

Assistance to Immigrants in reduc- 
tion of passage money 1,382 00 775 13 222 62 

Bonus to Immigrants paid in 

Ontario 2,040 00 2,04.6 00 

Incidentals 375 .55 829 84 1,511 27 

Inspection .... 127 00 .... 

Total $46,265 36 $31,975 09 $39,650 12 

Cost per head, including Immi- 
grants settled through Agencies 
only $3 96 $2 44 $1 62 



The Free Grant Laxds. 

There has been some decrease in the number of persons settled in 1879 on the Free 
Grant Lands of Ontario. This is undoubtedly owing, in great part, to the opening up of 
the prairie lands of Manitoba and the Noi-th West. In 1879, 1,503 persons, representing 
a population of about 7,000, were located as against 2,115 persons, representing about 
9,000 souls in 1878. The following statement, condensed from the Reports of the Com- 
missioner of Crown Lands, shews the progress of the Free Grant Districts since 1868: 



YEAR. 


Number of Town- 
ships set apart. 


Number of persons 
located. 


o 
3 

o 

11 

5^ 


Number of pur- 
chasers. 


Number of acres 
sold. 


Number of lots, the 
locati(ms of which 
have been cancel- 
led. 


"S 

p. 
o 

n 


1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 


15 
24 
14 

1 
18 

6 
10 

1 

4 

1 


511 

506 

1,200 

1,113 

875 

757 

919 

1,387 

1,463 

1,914 

2,115 

1,506 


46,336 
56,011 
155,4271 
15.3, 105 J 
115,065 
100,603i 
119,070 
186,807 
192,858 
260,801 
274,238 
199,500 


82 

52 

148 

139 

97 

79 

57 

89 

110 

149 

188 

123 


2,120 
956 
4,58oi 
3,452i 
2,2684 
5,038 
2,144 
3,896 
2,261 
.5, .034 
6,637 
4,911 




148 
381 
453 
381 
462 
691 
1,118 
1,018 




1872 




1873 




1874 . 


755 


1875 


570 


1876 


546 


1877 


542 


1878 


472 


1879 


513 


Total 


94 


14,326 


1,859,822J 


1,313 


43,80.31 


4,652 


3,398 







)iiiil Papers (No. 6.) 



TABLE A. — Slicwing f/ie miinbei- of iiiunigmitts arrived, flic number rciiiaiiied in Ontario, with their nationalities, nnei tlie niunber who passed tlirongh the Province, for tite twelve months 

ending J ist December, i8jg. 





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Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. G.) A. 1880 

The following statement shews the number of letters and other documents received 
and the number sent out from the Department, exclusive of maps and ordinary circulars, 
during the year 1879 : — 

Number of special letters written, copied and sent out 858 

Number of telegrams 260 

Number of sessional letters and circulars 1,994 

Number of letters and circulars re i migration pamphlet 344 

Number of passenger warrants sent to England 99 

Total number sent out 3,555 

Number of special letters received and filed 2,150 

Number of sessional letters received 1,506 

Number of letters received re Immigration pamphlet 205 

Total number received 3,861 

Number of Immigration a'ccounts certified and filed in duplicate. . 387 

Number of Afrricultural College accovints received and examined . . 254 

Number of approved immigrants sent for 236 

Amount of money paid through the Department to bring out 

approved immigrants from the British Isles $4,585 10 

Further details will be found in the various appendices to this Report. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

ARTHUR S. HARDY, 

Coirmissioner. 
Toronto, February, 1880. 



IX 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. 1880 



APPENDIX A. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF PETER BYRNE, ESQ., ONTARIO IMMIGRATION 
AGENT, LONDON, ENGLAND. 

Canada Buildings, 
31 Queen Yictoria Stkeet, London, 
To the Honourable Arthur S. Hardy, January 2nd, ISSO. 

Commissioner of Immigration, d'c, 
Toronto. 

Sir, — I have the honour to report that during the last year, as heretofore, I have 
continued to attend to all the correspondence addressed to these offices, specially relating 
to Ontario, and to answer all personal inquiries both with regard to emigration and 
sundry other subjects. As the Canadian offices in London become better known as the 
centre of every kind of information respecting the Dominion and its Provinces, these 
inquiries are found to increase in variety as well as in number. The great majority, of 
course, come from intending emigrants, but very many are made by persons who desire 
the information asked for other purposes than that of emigration. 

Thus, amongst the seekers for intelligence on matters pertaining to our Province, 
in which they are ^professionally or otherwise interested, I find lawj^ers, clergymen, 
military and naval officers, journalists, statisticians, educationists, engineers, traders, 
speculators, scientific men, politicians, philanthropists, &c., etc. The facts communicated 
in reply to their inquiries must and do sensibly tend to promote a healthy emigration by 
making the institutions and the resources of the Province more and more widely known 
amongst the educated and influential classes of the old country. 

In accordance with your suggestion I recently paid a short visit to Scotland, the 
scene of my former effort in the work of promoting emigration, in order to confer 
with several persons of the small tenant farmer class, with some of whom I had been in 
previous communication. This visit confirmed the impression I had previously formed 
from the large number of inquiries that have reached this office, that the present year 
would witness a very marked increase in the number of agricultural emigrants with 
capital. The past year has been by far the woi'st of a series of four disastrous seasons 
for the agricultural community generally of the United Kingdom. It has been the 
wettest, coldest and most sunless year almost ever before experienced, and the winter, 
doNvn to the latter part of December, has also been of very exceptional severity. For 
example, in some parts of the Highlands of Scotland the grain crop never ripened at all 
and was cut down for the sake of the straw after the snow had commenced to fall. It is, 
therefore, no wonder that wide spread gloom and discouragement exist among the old 
country farmers, and that many are eagerly inquiring whether emigration to Canada 
offers a way of escape from their unfortunate condition. 

The reports brought home by the Scotch farm delegates, who visited Canada during 
the past autumn, has given a great stimulus to this movement. Their regular written 
reports have not yet been published, but some of them last month addressed meetings of 
their friends and constituents at Galashiels, Stranraer and other places in the south of 
Scotland, and give most interesting accounts of what they saw in the Dominion and their 
opinions and impressions of the agricultural resources and capacities of the several Pro- 
vinces visited. 

Lengthy reports of their speeches appeared in several newspapers, including The 
North British Agricidturist, an ably conducted journal, which circulates widely among 
the farmers of Scotland and the Nortli of England. I had the honour to forward you a 
marked copy of this paper, containing the reports in question. 



43 Victoria 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



On reading over these reports I judged it well to have such portions of them as re- 
fei-red specially to Ontario, printed for immediate distribution. I accordingly prepared 
them for that purpose, and they are now in the hands of the printer. 

My stock of Ontario maps with information on the back, having become exhausted, 
I had .5,000 copies printed during the past year. To render it more useful and interest- 
ing to intending emigrants, I had inserted alongside the Provincial Map, a map of one 
of the Free Grant townships, on a scale sufficiently large to shew the mode of laying out 
the land for settlement, each lot already occupied having the name of the occupier printed 
upon it. It also shews the main roads, and affords a pretty good idea of the physical 
features of the Free Grant districts generally. For this township map I am indebted to 
an admirable work of refei'ence published last year, by H. K Page & Co., of Toronto, 
entitled " The Guide Book and Atlas of Muskoka and Parry Sound Districts," a copy of 
which was forwarded to me by Mr. Spence. 

When I shall have received a supply of the new pamphlets, which I understand 
you will shortly have ^-eady, I shall be well furnished with printed information for dis- 
tribution. I would, however, suggest that printed lists of improved farms for sale, giving 
prices and tolerably full particulars, would be a very useful, and at this time especially 
a most important adjunct to the maps, pamphlets, etc. 

Owing to the rush to Manitoba, I believe there is at present in the Province of On- 
tario an unusually large number of desirable farms in the market ; and from what I have 
said above, it will be apparent that there is likely to be an increased demand for such 
properties this year, on the part of old country emigrants. 

Such lists as I refer to would tend to increase this demand, if freely distributed 
amongst intending emigrants of the tenant farmer class, who, by their aid, would be able 
closely to estimate what they could do with a given amount of capital. No information 
that an agent could put into their hands would be read with deeper interest or keener 
scrutiny. 

It will be seen by the Board of Trade emigration returns, a summary of which I ap- 
pend to this report, that the emigration to British North America during the past year 
shews an increase of over 60 per cent., as compared with that of 1878. Of this increase 
Ontario has doubtless received a goodly share, including, as I believe it will be found, a 
larger proportion than usual of settlers with capital. 

It is hardly necessary for me to repeat, what I have so often before stated, that I 
have endeavoured as far as possible to discourage and prevent the emigration of unsuit- 
able persons ; and I believe the .same may be said of all the other official agents in this- 
country, both of the Dominion and the Provinces. 

The number of emigrants sent through this agency during the past year, whose pas- 
sages were paid by friends in Ontario, was 246. They consisted, for the most part, of the 
families of agricultural labourers previously settled and of female domestic servants. 

The bonus formerly given to emigrants was, in accordance ^vith your instructions, 
entirely discontinued during the past year, except in the case of a small number of fami- 
lies and female domestics t:) vv'aom it had been previously promised. 

The following is the summary of the Board of Trade Emigration returns for the 
years 1879 and 1878, referred to in preceding report : — 



United States. 


B. N. America. 


Australia. 


All other places. 


Total. 


1879. 


1878. 


1879. 


1878. 


1879. 


1878. 


1879. 


1878. 


1879. ' 1878. 

! 


1.32,524 


79,99.5 


22,459 


1.3,836 


41,-546 


36,782 


17,901 


15,099 


1 
214,430 145,712 



I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

P. BYRNE. 
2 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (iNo. 6.) 



A. 1880 



APPENDIX B. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF L. STAFFORD, ESQ., IMMIGRATION AGENT, 

QUEBEC. 

GovERXMEXT Immigration Office, 

Quebec, 11th December, 1879. 

Sir, — I have the honour to report to yoa, for the information of the Honovirah^e the 
Minister of Immigration for the Province of Ontario, statements shewing the number of 
cabin and steerage passengers arrived at this port, during the current year, up to 30th 
November. Also tables shewing the numbers brought out by each line of steamships, 
their nationalities, trades and callings, the general destinations of the steerage pas- 
sengers, and the number assisted with free transport to the Province of Ontario. 

The total arrivals at the Port of Quebec in 1879 wei'e : 



Add births at sea , 



Cabin. Steerage. 

2,380 14,841 

1 



Total. 

17,221 

1 



Deduct deaths at sea , 



2,380 
1 



14,842 
3 



17,222 
4 



2,379 14,839 17,218 

The arrivals, compared with those of 1878, shew an increase of 6,923 souls. 



Comparative Tables of 


Arrivals, 1878 


AND 18 


79. 








1878. 


1879. 


u 
o 

a 
1— 1 




Where from. 


Cabin. 


1 

Steerage. 


Cabin. 


Steerage. 


CS 

m 

S-t ■ 

a 

<u 

ft 


England 


2,050 
134 
145 


5,450 

779 

1,280 


2,144 
131 
104 


11,969 

957 

1,498 


6,613 
175 
177 




Scotland 




Total from United Kingdom 


2, .329 


7,509 
457 


2,379 



14,424 
415 


6,965 




Via United States, odd ships, &c 


42 








Cabin .... 




7,966 
2,329 





14,839 
2,379 


6,965 


42 








Grand Total .... 




10,295 





17,218 


6,965 


49 









43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



Shewing an increase of 6,965 in the immigration from the United Kingdom, and a 
decrease of 42 via the United States, odd ships, &c. 

The total number of Steamers which arrived with passengers was 91. 

The average passage of the Allan Line was, Mail Steamers from Liverpool 10 
days ; Londondei-ry, 9 days ; Glasgow Steamers, from Glasgow, IH days; Dominion Line, 
from Liverpool, 12| days ; Canada Shipping Co'y. (Beaver Line), l2| days ; Temperlay's 
London Line, 13^^. 



The number of Cabin and Steerage by each line of vessels was as follows : — 

Cabin. Steerage. Total. 

Allan Line, Mail Steamers 1,973 10,834 12,807 

Glasgow Steamers 104 1;498 1,602 

" " from Liverpool.. . . 136 136 

Dominion Line of Steamers 254 1,477 1,731 

Canada Shipping Co'y (Beaver Line) 31 459 490 

Temperlay's London Steamers 17 20 37 

Via United States, odd ships, &c ... 415 415 

2,379 14,839 17,218 

Tlie nationalities of the passengers brought out by each line were as follows : — 





English. 




8 

02 


S 

S-i 


a 

> 

03 
i3 

s 


i 


"1 


2 

o 

h-l 




■A 


-3 


Allan Line Mail Steamers from Liver- 


\ 
8,410 1.0S8 1 


289 


2,717 


58 
9 

3 

63 


208 ... . 

.... 248 

... i.... 
1 
1 


31 


6 12.807 








1,345 




1,602 












136 

8 

11 


136 




1,347 

348 

37 

240 


297 
112 

42 


45 

18 

40 


31 

12 

17 


1,731 


Canada Shipping Co. Steamers 

London Steamers 








490 
37 


Via United States, odd ships, &c . . . 


2 .... 415 




■ i 1 
10,382 1 1,539 1,448 ' 349 

1 1 i 


2,872 


133 


208 


248 


33 6 17,218 

1 



The nationalities of the Immigrants of 1879, compared with those of 1878, were 

as follows : — 

1878. 

English .... 5,350 

Irish 1,042 

Scotch 1,077 

Germans 238 

Scandinavians 1,538 

French and Belgians 155 



1879. 

10,382 

1,539 

1,448 

349 
2,872 

133 



Carried forward . 
4 



43 Victoria. 



•Sessional Paj)ers (No, 6.) 



A. 1880 



1878. 1879. 

Bro^iglit forward 

Swiss 146 33 

Italians 8 6 

Russians (Meiinonites) 323 208 

Icelanders 418 248 

10,295 17,218 

The number of single men arrived was 6,995. 
The number of single women arrived was 1,494. 

Trades and callings of the steerage male adults as per Passenger Lists were as 
follows : — 

Farmers 340 

Labourers 7,1 18 

Mechanics 923 

Clerks, Traders, etc 12 

8,393 

The following table gives the number of Immigrants assisted to emigrate to the Pro- 
vince of Ontario, by various parties, during season 1879 : — 




May 4 Sardinian. . . 

" 29 ; Nestorian. .. 

.June 14 i Sardinian. . . 

i 

" 21 1 Moravian . . . 

! 

" 23 Texas .... 

Aug. 31 Circassian . . 

Sept. 7 Sardinian . . . 



Mr. Quarrier, Glasgow 18 

I 
I 

Miss E j-e j 1 

Mr. Middlemore, Birmingham | 1 

Rev. Mr. Stephenson, Hamilton I 4 



Miss Macpherson 
Miss Rye 



14 
1 



48 



6 

18 

20 

2 

8 

y 

8 



IS 
90 
32 
50 
16 
42 
24 

271 



35 
134 
53 
60 
28 
GG 
41 



27 



417 



The total number assisted with free transport to the Province of Ontai'io, was :- 

Souls. Adults. 

Males 4,050 4,050 

Females 1,362 1,362 

Children 1,082 541 

Infants 832 

7,326 5,953 
5 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. 1880 



Their nationalities were : — 

Souls. Adults. 

En£(lish 5,261 4,2341 

Irish 8,53 7491 

Scotch 50.5 388" 

Germans 311 238| 

Norwegians 340 295^ 

French 10 21 

Icelanders 12 9^^ 

Swiss 28 22" 

Italians 6 6 

7,323 5,953 

They were forwarded to the following places in the Province of Ontario : — 

Souls. Adults. 

Ottawa 272 2211 

Central District 646 490 

Toronto 4,765 3,9701 

West of Toronto 1,643 1,271" 

7,326 5,953 

The general destinations of the steerage passengers, as per returns from Grand 
Trunk Railway, were as follows : — 

Adults. 

Eastern Townships 190 

Montreal l,115i- 

Total, Province of Quebec 1,305^ 

Adults. 

Ottawa City 241 

Ottawa District 104^ 

Kingston City 131 

Kingston District 410| 

Toronto 4,342" 

West of Toronto 1 Jl <■* 

Total, Province of Ontario 6,9461 

Adults. 

Nova Scotia 29 

New Brunswick 59 

Manitoba 4851 

British Columbia 12 

585| 

Total adults 8,837^ 

To which may be added ^ for children and infants. . . 2,946 

Total number of souls remaining in Canada 11,783 

Adults. 

Eastern States 2031 

Western States, chiefly Scandinavians 2,439|^ 

Total adults . . 2,643 

6 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. 1880 



The steerage passengers were of the usual classes, viz. : — farmers, farm labourers, 
mechanics, and female servants. They arrived in a healthy condition, and were free from 
any contagious disease. 

J have the honour to be, 

Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

L. STAFFORD, 

Agent. 
David Spexce, Esq., 

Secretary, Department of Immigration, 
Toronto. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF EDWIN CLAY, ESQ., DOMINION IMMIGRATION 

AGENT, HALIFAX. 

Dominion of Canada Immigration Office, 

Halifax, N.S., 9th January, 1880. 
D. Spence, Esq., 

Secretary, 
Ontario Immigration Department, 
Toronto, Ont. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit for the information of your Department the fol- 
lowing brief Report of the Immigration for 1879 : — 

The total number of arrivals at this port during the year is 3,955, or nearly twice as 
many as for 1878. Of this number, 2,049 were for Ontario. 
"^Assistance, in the shape of free tickets, was given to 1,14.3 adults to Toronto, and to 
239 adults to other points in your Province, making a total of 1,382. 

I regret my .inability to give a general detailed account of the above number, but an 
estimate may be formed from a knowledge of the classification of the total immigration. 
- u!.;!..The total number reported was 3,955, of which there were : — 

English 2,516 

Irish 706 

Scotch 67 

Germans 222 

Scandinavians 391 

French and Belgians 21 

Other countries 32 

3,955 
The trades represented are : — 

Farmers 51 

Farm and general labourers 2, 1 32 

Mechanics 243 

Clerks, traders, etc 72 

Female servants 295 

7 



43 Yictoria. Sessional Papers {No. 6.) A. 1880 



There were : — 

Males : 2,503 

Females 751 

Cliildreu 701 

Total 3,955 

Tlie ultimate destinations of the 3,955 were : — 

Nova Scotia 733 

New Brunswick 208 

P. E. Island 1 

Quebec 400 

Ontario 2,049 

^lanitoba 28 

British Columbia 1 

Eastern States 182 

Western States 342 

New Zealand via San Francisco 1 

The health has been good as a general rule, and the people have looked strong and 
hearty, but the extreme poverty so evident with many must of necessity operate against 
their success in this country. 

I have the honour to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

EDWIN CLAY, M.D., 

DojuiiiioH Immigration Agent. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. 1880 



ANNUAL REPORT OF MR. R. M. PERSSE, ONTARIO IMMIGRATION 

AGENT, QUEBEC. 



Toronto, 2nd Jamiary, 1880. 



The Honourable A. S. Hardy, 

Commissioner of Immigration, 
Toronto. 



Sir, — I have the honour to submit for your information the following report of oiy 
operations during the immigration season of 1879 : — 

From the 1st of April to the 22ncl June I made 16 trips, convoying between Mon- 
treal and Toronto the immigrants of 1 8 steamships. 

On the 25th of June I was notified by Mr. Spence, the Secretary of the Department, 
to proceed to Quebec to re-open and take charge of the Ontario Immigration Office at that 
port, which was closed since the close of navigation in 1875. 

I arrived at Point Levis on Saturday, the 28th, and immediately took steps to place 
the office in good shape for the reception of Ontario immigrants. 

On the 1st of July the S.S. Corinthian, from Glasgow, arrived, with 11 cabin and 47 
steerage passengers, when I issued Ontario orders for free passes to 12| adults direct on 
the G.T.R., 18^ adults having their own railway tickets to various parts of the Province. 

The orders issued on the Grand Trunk Railway for passes were kept separate from 
those issued by the Dominion Agent, and duplicates of the account were handed me fort- 
nightly, which, after being examined and certihed by me, were forwarded to the De- 
partm'^nt. 

The total number of steerage immigrants arrived at Quebec during the season of 
navigation was 14,861, as against 7,279 arrived in 1878. 

Their general destination was as follows : — 

Adults. 

Maritime Provinces 88 

Eastern Townships 190 

Montreal City 1,115| 

British Columbia 12 

Manitoba 485 J 

United States 2,643 

Ontario 6,946| equal to 9,262 souls. 

Total 11,4801 equal to 14,861 souls. 

To arrive at the numbers of souls, it will be necessary to add to the adults one 
third for children and infants. 

The total number of steamships that arrived with immigrants was 93, as against 
84 during 1878, shewing an increase of 9 steamships. 

It is only fair to assume that the 6,946^- adults reported as forwarded to Ontario, 
does no£ fully represent the actual numbers as settled in the Province, for a very large 
percentage of the 1,1 15^ adults forwarded to Montreal City, after being thei'e a few 
days, found their way to Toronto, being forwarded by the Dominion Government Agent 
at that station, or else they purchased railway tickets. 

The number of adults who received free passes to Ontario, through this agency, was 
5,517, equal to 6,826 souls. This will include the passes issued by the Dominion Agent 
at Quebec, previous to the 30th of June, the date on which I took charge of Office, as 
agent for this Province. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



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43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. 1880 



The passenger lists supplied to me by the different steamship companies do not give 
the hondjide occupations of the male adults, and, as a rule, the majority are entered as 
" labourers'"' so that no reliance can be placed on this source in obtaining the trades and 
callings of the steerage male adults. 

For example, the S.S. "Polynesian," which arrived on the 9th November, the last 
mail steamer for the season, had on board 396 steerage immigrants, and all the male adults 
■were classed (excepting five (5) entered as mechanics) as "labourers." "When these 
immigrants presented themselves at my office for free passes to Ontario, I found that a 
large number were mechanics. Acting under Departmental instructions, I deemed it 
necessary to refuse some sixty-five who were of this class, though entered as laboui-ers, 
they being engine-drivers, engine-fitters, cotton-spinners, moulders, grooms, pattern-makers, 
tinsmiths, carpenters, brick-layers, tool-makers, plate-layers, boiler-makers and pensioners, 
all of whom claimed to be forwarded free on the grounds that they were a^^sisted immi- 
grants, having paid for tiieir ocean fare £3 10s., £3 15s. and £4 15s. respectively. 

The following will give an idea of the difficulties to be met with to ascertain the occu- 
pations of these people before leaving the British Isles, and the trouble and delay caused 
by having to ask each immigrant, before granting a pass, the following questions : — 
"What is your name?" 
" T. Crossley, sir." 
" What is your occupation?" 

" Well, I came out as an assisted immigi-ant to do farming : I paid J 3 10s. each for 
myself and family ; was a passenger by the S.S. 'Polvnesian '"; I am an iron moulder by 
trade." 

" You will have to stand aside for the present, Mr. Crossley." 
Next man'y name is Wm. Holland. 

" W^hat is your occupation, Mr. Holland, and where do you want to go to 1 " 
" I have been engine-driving in England ; myself and some friends paid £3 15s. 
each for our passage by S.S. ' Polynesian' ; we came out as assisted immigrants ; we were 
informed by the Agent, whom we took our passage from, that we would be sent to Toronto 
or Hamilton free, and that we were certain to get employment there." 
Next man's name is Major Salt. 
" What do you do Mr. Salt ?" 

" I have been farming in England, sir, and intend following farming in Canada ; my 
wife can make butter and take charge of a dairy ; I paid £i 15s. each for myself and 
wife; I was a passenger by the S.S. 'Polynesian.'" 
Next was a domestic servant. 
" What is your name 1 " 
"Jane Jamieson." 
" What is your occupation V 

" I am a domestic servant, and want to go to Toronto ; I was a passenger by the S.S. 
'Polynesian,' and paid for my passage £6 6s'. at Allan's office in Liverpool, and am very 
much surprised I should be charged so much when some friends paid only £3 10s. and 
£-1 15s. each, and by the same steamer." 

By this it will be seen that bond fide farm labourers and female domestic servants 
paid the highest ocean-rate, while engine-di'ivers, engine-fitters, grooms, clerks and such 
like immigrants that are not needed at all, received ocean passage tickets at lowest rate, 
namely &Z 10s. and £3 15s. each adult. 

Female Domestic Servants. 

The arrival of female domestic servants fell far short of any previous year during 
my time, and I don't hesitate to ascribe the almost total failure in obtaining this very 
desirable and much needed class to the absence of assisted passages. The rate at present 
charged them, namely, £4 15s. Oc^., and £6 %s. Od., sounds very liigh compared with what 
it was in 1874-75-76-77 and 78, when ocean tickets could be obtained at $5.10, or 
£1 Os. 4c/. sterling, and until something of this sort is re-introduced, we must not calcu- 
late on much increase. 

14 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. 1880 



Dominion Steamship Company. 

In issuing orders for railway passes to approved immigrants, I generally enquire as 
to their treatment during the passage, and it is my pleasing duty to report that immi- 
grants by above line spoke in very high terms of the kindness received and attention paid 
them, by both officers and crew. They generally remarked that the food was well cooked, 
wholesome and plentifully supplied, and was served with care and cleanliness, not 
" slovenly, as in most steamships carrying steerage passengers." 

Immigration of Children. 

Miss Rye, Miss Macpherson, Miss Bilbrough, Mr. John T. Middlemore and Rev. 
Mr. Stephenson brought out a number of intei'esting children at various periods of the 
season. Number, ages and sexes will be found appended. 

Army Pensioners. 

In the early part of November a number of recently-discharged soldiers, from Dublin 
Ireland, arrived. They stated they were induced to come to Canada by a steamship agent 
of that city ; that their pension was advanced to pay for ocean passage ; that promises 
were made that on landing immediate employment would be found for them. 

I had to refuse passes to forty-five (45) of these men, not being of the class entitled 
to assistance. The agent for the Dominion Government gave them passes to Montreal 
and other points, and in a few days afterwards thirty-seven (37) of these men made their 
appearance at the Immigration Sheds, Toronto. 

Scandinavian Immigrants. 

During the season, small parties of Swedes arrived by each mail steamer, holding 
orders for free transport " to tlie inner " of the country, from Mr. J. P. Fehrlund, 
Allan's agent at Gothenburg. I was obliged in many cases to refuse them passes, 
being doubtful as to their remaining in Ontario, as the following correspondence will 
shew : — 

[Extract.^ 

" Quebec, 9th August, 1879. 

" Sir, — I regret to inform you that one of your agents, named Fehrlund, of Gothen- 
burg, gave an order on this office for free railway passes to Ontario, to three Swedish 
immigrants, named respectively, A. B. Hanson, Y. A. Anderson, and Carl Anderson, ex 
S.S. " Peruvian." On my closely questioning them through the Government Interpreter 
at this station, I learned their destination was not Ontario, but the Western States, and 
as a matter of course refused them free transport. They subsequently bought their 
-tickets for Traverse City, State of Michigan, and had in their possession over $100 in 
American money. Your Interpreter, Mr. Maguire, of the S.S. ' Peruvian' brought them 
from the ship to the office and pressed their claim for free tickets to Ontario in accord- 
ance with the letter from your Gothenburg agent. In a few hours afterwards, I met 
him (Maguire) and he was obliged to admit that a fraud was attempted. 

" It is a mistake to think that immigrants going to the Western States, can be 
assisted to Toronto, or to any part of the Province of Ontario. Foreign Agents giving 
orders on this office will have to be closely watched in the future, as this is not the only 
case of a similar nature that has occurred this season. 

" I have the honour to be, 

" Your obedient servant, 
"John Ennis, Esq., "Richard M. Persse, 

'' Messrs. Allan Bros.. " Ontario Immigration Agent." 

" Liverpool, England." 

15 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. 1880 



The steamship "Circassian" arrived at Quebec, 31st August, and brought out 379 
steerage immigrants ; among the number were twenty (20) Swedes with letter from 
Allan's Agent, Gothenburg, as follows : — , 

"GOTHENBERG, loth Angust, 1879. 

'' To the Canadian Government Officer, 
" Quebec. 

" Dear Sir, — I beg to recommend to you Swedish immigrants below named, now going 
over in order to seek agricultural or other labour, and I hope you will do the best for 
them, as friends and relations are waiting their opinion of Canada before they leave their 
home in the old land. 

" Yours truly, 

"Y. P. Fehrluxd, 

" Allan Line Agejit." 

The Interpreter for the Allans brought them to the Ontario Immigration Office, pre 
sented above letter and through him they requested to be passed to Toronto, if not to 
Manitoba. I took the usvial caution, went to the baggage room, observed some of the pack- 
ages marked " Michigan." On my return to the office, I refused them passes, told them, 
through their Interpreter, of the fraud attempted on the Province of Ontario. 

Sixteen of this party purchased tickets for Michigan, the remainder, a family of four, 
went to Waterville, Compton, a village within nineteen miles of the Eastern States. 

The steamship " Sardinian " arrived on the 7th September, having on board nine 
Swedes with the usual letter from Mr. Fehrlund, for " free passes to the inner of the- 
country." Previous to my issuing general passes I noticed this party at Mr. Tofield's 
office (the Dominion Government catei-er), in the Government buildings, changing their 
drafts amomiting to about $300, into American money, not Canadian. This caused me 
to be suspicious of them, and they were accordingly refused free transport. 

Some short time afterwards a professional gentleman, a resident of Toronto, who was 
a passenger by same steamship, in walking through the building where the baggage is 
passed the Customs, overheard the following conversation by this Swedish party : — " That 
if they could only get a free pass from the Government Agent as far as Toronto, it would 
lessen expense to Michigan." 

"Gothenburg, 19th Sejytember, 1879. 
" To the Government Immigration Officer, Quebec. 

"At foot please find names of some intending Canadian settlers, who are recommended 
to your kindly attention. 



Agricultural and 
saw mill labourers. 



" John Ptadfelt Aged 26 1 

Carl Y. Lundberg " 24 

Olaf Asplund " 28 

Magnus Johnson " 27 

Anders E. Anderson " 26 

K Berglund " 25 

Paulus Johnson " 23 

"Yours truly, 

"Y. P. Fehrlund, 

"Allan lyine Agent." 

The above immigrants were passengers by the S.S. "Sarmatian," arrived 6th October, 
presented above letter to me, and requested to be forwarded to Toronto. I had doubts 
of their being bona fide settlers, and consequently refused them passes. 

Th eir scheme to be passed to Toronto being checkmated, they purchased tickets from 

16 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. 1880 



Mr. Shipman, G.T.R. ticket agent, to the Western States, clearly proving they never in- 
tended to become Canadian settlers. This document is certified to by Mr. Stafford, the 
agent for the Dominion Government. 

I would, therefore, respectfully recommend that free passes to all Swedish immi- 
grants be for the present discontinued, as they are not a reliable class of settlers, as the 
following correspondence will shew : — 



"R M. Persse Esq., 

'• Ontario Immigration Agent, 
"Quebec." 



"Passengek Department, 
Alexander Buildings, 19 James Street, 

" Liverpool, 10th November, 1879. 



"Dear Sir, — I have received the enclosed from our Gothenburg agent, and hope you 
will think with me, that there has been no intent, as far as he is concerned, to practise 
any fraud upon the Canadian Government. 

" Scandinavian emigrants, as a rule, are not to be depended upon — they will say any- 
thing to suit their own purpose, and they Avould deceive our agent as soon as they would 
deceive you. 

" I hope you will have a better opinion of Mr. Fehrlund when you have read the en- 
closed. 

** Yours truly, 

"John Ennis." 

" Toronto, 26th November, 1879. 

" Dear Sir, — I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your favour of the 10th 
inst., -with enclosure from your Gottenburg Agent, regarding six Swedes who were refused 
free passes by me to Ontario. 

"I refused them because the previous parties holding letters from Mr. Fehrlund for 
assistance by railway passes to the ' inner of the country,' were unreliable, and as I 
was doubtful, I refused them. When the train was about starting, they purchased tickets 
for Chicago. 

"The six Swedes who wrote from Quebec complaining that they were not forwarded to 
their destination, were certainly refused free transport, but as they had sufficient money 
to purchase tickets to Toronto, I told them through the Government Interpreter, that ir 
they would give proof of their locating in Ontario, I would recommend that their railway 
fare should be refunded, which was accordingly done, as per letter, 1 9th September, copy 
herewith enclosed. 

" I am glad to have this correspondence with your Mr. Fehrlund, as he seems to have 
been a subject of imposition rather than a party to it. 

" I have the honour to be, 
"Dear Sir, 

" Your obedient servant, 

" John Ennis, Esq., " K M. Persse, 

" Messrs. Allan Bros., " Ontario Immigration Agent." 

" liverpool, England." 



From these and other facts that came under my notice, while at Quebec, I am con- 
vinced that many immigrants from this Agency have been attempting to make Ontario a 
stepping-stone to the Western States, and are well posted as to the modus operandi bj 
parties at home or by friends in the United States. 

17 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. 1880 



It may, perhaps, be said, that the course of action taken in refusing passes to the 
above mentioned Swedish immigrants was altogether unusual, unnecessary and unwise, 
but under my instructions from the Department, and with such prima facie evidence, 
there was no other course for me to pursue. 

German and Italian Immigration. 

There is another class of immigrants I must here refer to, sent out at various periods 
of the year by Richard Berne, of Antwerp. 

This gentleman is agent for the Messrs. Allan at that city, and is also a paid agent 
of the Dominion Government. 

The immigrants sent by this agent were a truly -wretched lot, not at all a desirable 
class of settlers for Ontario, being miners from Italy and mechanics from Germany. They 
all had with them lithographed letters requesting to be passed to Toronto, many to Sarnia 
and Windsor, clearly proving how very little this Dominion Government Agent knew of 
the geography of our Province, when he would request of the Government Agent at 
Quebec to pass them to the very borders of the United States. 

When large parties arrived I forwarded them to Ottawa, advising Mr. Wills, the 
Agent at that city. The further inland such people are sent, the less chance there is for 
them to cross the line. 

Notwith.standing all my caution, some of them returned from the district they were 
located in and purchased railway tickets to the coal mines of Pennsylvannia, U.S. 

The same rule should apply to this class of immigrants as to tlie Scandinavians. 

In closing this report I must not omit calling again your attention to the kind and 
courteous treatment received by the immigrants, at the hands of the vai'ious employees 
of the Grand Trunk Railway, during the joui-ney from Quebec. I also desire to e.tpress 
my thanks to Mr. Gregory, the assistant superintendent at Point Levis, and the staff 
under his charge, who did all they possibly could to aid me in my duties, and in thf 
dispatch of immigrant "Specials." 

I have tha honour to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

R. M. PERSSE, 
Ontario Immigration Agent. 



18 



43 Victoria. 



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J*i 


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SM 



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'a ^ 






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COP-I 


P-io; 



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CJ rt ■ 



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fi p. 

a; cS 

ill 

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20 



[S Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



ANNUAL REPORT OF W. J. WILLS, ESQ., IMMIGRATION AGENT, 

OTTAWA. 

Government Immigration Office, 

Ottawa, 1st January^ 1880. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my Annual Report of the operations of this 
Agency during the year 1879. The total nuinber of arrivals are as follows, viz.: — 

European immigrants 836 

Settlers from the United States 768 

1,604 

Deduct immigrants gone to Manitoba 32 

" " " Quebec 186 

" " " United States 10—228 

Total number settled in Ontario 1,376 

I would respectfully mention that in addition to the immigrants placed by me, quite 

number of others have been sent to various points in ,my district, direct from Quebec 

Vere those added to the arrivals reported by me a large increase over last year would be 

pparent. There are also, as always happens, large numbers arriving here who do not 

eport to the Agency at all, as they come to friends previously settled. 

Customs Returns, shewing the number of immigrants arrived at the followdno' Ports 
f Entry, with value of eflects : 

Souls. Value of Effects. 

Port of Prescott 181 $5,076 00 

" Ottawa 140 6,035 00 

" Brockville 246 8,487 00 

" Morrisburg 75 1,571 00 

" Cornwall 126 5,707 00 

768 $26,876 00 

tatement shewing the number of immigrants -arrived at the Ottawa Agency, for the 
twelve months ending 31st December, 1879, and their nationality, the number 
assisted with provisions, and with free passes by railways or other conveyances from 
this agency to their respective places of destination. 



COUNTRY FROM. 



> % 



<u 




^ 


xn 










a 


d 


g 


m 




,_t 


rc 


0) 


c4 


■*^ 




(3 


^ 


P 


< 





Ingland 

•eland 

cotland . . 

ermany 

orvvay and Sweden . 

ranee 

jeland 

merica 

ther Countries 



207 


27 


133 


45 


m 


28 


i6i; 


7(J 


35 


G 


24 


23 

1 
1 

1 


G31 


205 



234 

178 
94 

242 
41 
47 



836 



.SO 



p^ 



ill 

124 
87 

192 
30 

7 



(J'J9 



^ > 



48 
40 
19 
03 
24 
2 



10 



296 



116 

00 

38 

144 

23 

35 



437 



21 



W. J. Wills, 

■A.gent. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



Statement shewing the total number of immigrants arrived, and remained to be dealt 
with at the Ottawa Agency, for the twelve months ending 3Lst December, 1879. 



MONTHS. 



January . . 
February 
March 



April 
May . 
June 
July . 



August . 



September . 
October . . 
NoTember 
December 




W. J. Wills, 

Agent. 

Statement shewing the number of Immigrants who received assistance in the shape 
of passages and provisions, 535 souls, equal to 484 adults, at a cost of $2.17 per 
adult. 



i Men. 

i 


Women. 


Childi-en. 


Total. 




87 
31 
61 
101 
16 
18 


24 
14 
30 
30 
8 
12 


18 
9 

16 

47 
3 

10 


129 


" Scotland 

" Ireland 


54 
107 

17S 




27 




40 








314 


118 


103 


535 



I have the honour to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

W. J. WILLS. 
To the Honourable the Commissioner of Immigration, 
Toronto. 

22 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. 1880 



ANNUAL REPORT OF RICHARD MACPHERSON, IMMIGRATION AGENT, 

KINGSTON, ONTARIO. 

Government Immigration Office, 

Kingston, oth January, 1880. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit for the information of the Honourable the Com- 
missioner of Immigration, the annual statements of this office for the year ending 31st 
December, 1879, viz : — 

1st. Statement shewing the number and nationality of immigrants arrived at the 
Kingston Agency during the year 1879, by way of the St. Lawrence and United States, 
respectively. 

2nd. Statement of monthly arrivals within this Agency during the past year, the 
number fed and distributed each month, also n\xmber of meals furnished to destitute 
immigrants. 

3rd. Statement shewing the number and destination of immigrants to whom fre© 
passes have been furnished. 

4:th. Statement shewing the number of settlers from the United States, as reported 
by the Collectors of Customs at the several ports of entry within this Agency for the past 
year, and the value of their effects, amounting to $30,288. 

There has been but little trouble in placing agricultural labourers within this Agency 
during the past season, particularly those who arrived previously to the month of August. 
It is most desirable that immigrants should come to Ontario during the Spring and early 
summer months. 

Mr. Quarrier, of Glasgow, Scotland, came over to Canada again last May, bringing 
with him for Marchmont Home, Belleville, one hundred and thirty children, just two- 
thirds more than in 1878, and Miss Bilbrough who controls this Home, with her usual 
readiness, had arrangements made for placing the greater number of them in good 
homes on their arrival. Mr. Quarrier remained in Ontario nearly two months. The 
greater part of this time was occupied in accompanying the children to their new homes 
in the country, and in visiting children previously brought to Ontario and placed by Miss 
Bilbrough from Marchmont, where I consider a good work is being done for them, and for 
this Province. 

Trusting that a large number of tenant farmers will, during the coming season, be 
induced to emigrate from Great Britain and take up their lot with us. 

I have the honour to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

R. Macpiierson, 

Government Immigration Agent 
David Spence, Esq., 

Secretary Department a/ Immigration, 

Toronto. 

23 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



Statement shewing the number of Immigrants arrived at the Kingston Agency, for 
the twelve months ending 31st December, 1879, and their nationality, the num- 
ber assisted with provisions, and with free passes by railways, or other conveyances, 
from this Agency to their respective places of destination. 



COUNTRY FROM. 



England 

Ireland 

Scotland , 

Germany , 

Norway 

Switzerland 

Iceland i . . 

America 

Other Countries 



EC ^ 



r2 O 



Pi 



^JC 



642 

171 

298 

22 



•Settlers from United States as reported by 
the Collectors of Customs at the several 
posts of entry in this Agency 



28 



1163 



11 
9 
5 
1 



4 

566 



653 

180 

303 

23 



596 



623 
171 
303 



32 14 

I 
566 I 566 



1759 I 1700 



§^ 



* Besides the above the several Collectors of Customs estimate several hundred having come into this 
Agency from the United States without making entries, not havirg efiects of any considerable value, but 
intending to reside in Ontario. 

Remarks : — 54 passed to the Province of Quebec. 



Statement shewing the total number of Immigrants arrived, and remained to be dealt 
with at the Kingston Agency, for the twelve months ending 31st December, 1879. 















_ 








































o 


^^ 






S-i 






















MONTHS. 




^ . 




o 

f^ 

h 




SI 
















a) — 






cc 


rS^ 


^ 


-2 




-ss 






















8 


.5^2 




^ 


:=-=! 


3>« 






u! 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


January 





14 


2 


16 


15 


16 


47 


February . . 




14 


2 


16 


12 


14 


22 






30 
81 


1 
3 


31 
84 


15 
46 


16 
33 


90 


April 




129 




275 


2 


277 


163 


50 


271 




Carried forward 



















24 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



MONTHS. 



Brought forward . 



June 
'July . 



August . . , 
September 
October . . . 
November 
December 



* Settlers from United States as reported by Collec- 
tors of Customs 



' 








<D 


1 










3 S 


















§. 




13 








t3 . 






13 <u 

^ 2 


^ 'm 
















J3-S 




^ 


,^hH 


rO a 


02 




r3 


a 


S >= 


S 3 


8 


■2^ 




3 


P.Q 




S 


•^ 


H 


^ 


'^ 


1 


174 




10 


184 


78 


102 


201 


156 


3 


159 


47 


62 


133 


133 


2 


137 


73 


82 


208 


110 


1 


111 


.39 


31 


106 


'JO 


2 


92 


32 


39 


147 


64 





64 


25 


42 


91 


'20 


2 


22 


20 


21 


72 


}.... 


5G6 


566 








1163 


596 


1759 


565 


568 


1517 



* Besides these the several Collectors of Customs estimate several hundred having come into this 
Agency from the United States without making entries, not having effects of any considerable value, but 
intending to reside in Ontario. 

Statement shewing the number and destination of Immigrants forwarded from this 
Agency by free passes for the twelve months ending 31st December, 1879. 



Stations. 



Adult 
Passes. 



Toronto 

Montreal ..... 

Cornwall 

Belleville 

Brockville 

Port Hope 

Ottawa .... 

Prescott 

Lancaster 

Madoc 

Bo\vmanviUe 

Oshawa 

Carleton 

Ernestown 

Wliitby 

Newtonville 

Gananoque 

Mallorytown . 

Aultsville 

Morrisburg 

Napanee 

Tyendinaga 

Duffin's Creek 

Ballantyne 

Colborne 

Cobourg 

Carried forward 



85 

52^ 

26| 

65i 

loS 

19 

10 

m 

34 

m 

5 
2 
4 
9 
1 

1 

1."; 

n 

8 
4 
2 
2 
1 
1 



395i 



Stations. 



Brought forward . 

Almonte 

Perth 

Smith's Falls 

Lindsay 

Fredericksburg 

Picton 

Parham 

Sharbot Lake 

Wolfe Island 

North Port 

Beaverton 

Orillia 

Adolphustown 

Bath 

Hamilton 

Amherst Island . 

!Marysburg 

Renfrew 

Peterboro' 

Palmerston 

Bethany 

Loughborough 

Camden 

Storrington 

Portland 



Total. 



Adult 



395^ 
2 
4 
1 
4 

3^ 

2 

1 

3 

5i 

4i 

1 

4 

2 

2 

3 

2 

2 

^ 

2 

7h 
1 
11 
4 
5 
3 



Kingston, 31st December 1879. 



R. Macpherson, 

Government Immigration Agent. 
25 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



Statemext shewing number of settlers from the United States, as reported to the Collec- 
tors of Customs at the diflerent Ports of Entry within the Kingston Immigration 
District for 1879, and value of their effects. 



Ports of Entry. 


< 


1 




o 1 


i 

ei 

•c 

6 

< 


Canadians re- 
turned from 
United States. 




i 

H- 1 




S 


g 
S 
O 


Value of 
Effects. 


Whitby 9 

Oshawa 3 


6 6 
4 7 


21 

14 

36 

1 


4 

12 

' 1 


16 
6 


S 


1 




5 


1 

' 1,105 00 
i 

330 00 


Darlington i 1.5 

Newcastle 1 


10 
21 


11 


.. .J 


2 


2 


8 


! 


2,944 00 
20 00 


Port Hope 


16 

4 

7 

7 

4 

.5 

48 

12 

44 

6 


i 
11 1 48 


1 

11 


.^4 


3 




I 





3,450 00 
1,063 00 


Cobourg 


4i « 


1 
20 1 

19 

14 

13 

157 

31 
158 

23 


1 1 18 




1 






Cramahe 


5 

7 

6 

6 

46 

11 

.52 

9 


7 
3 

63 
8 

62 
8 


1 

I 15 
i 

12 

76 

21 


19 
13 
13 
11 
90 
10 
82 
2 











! 675 00 


Brighton 












i 244 00 


Trenton 












485 00 


Picton 












940 00 


Belleville 

Xapanee 


10 
2 


14 
6 


.... 

7 
1 




21 


6,188 00 
2,569 00 


Kingston 







1 8,736 00 


Gananoque 












1,539 00 




i 












181 


187 198 


566 


1.54 


322 22 

1 


23 


11 


13 


21 


30,288 00 



26 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. 1880 



ANNUAL REPORT OF JOHN A. DONALDSON, ESQ., IMMIGRATION 

AGENT, TORONTO. 

Immigration Office, 

Toronto, January 1st, 1880. 

• 

Sir, — I have the honour of submitting for your information my annual report for 
the year ending December 31st, 1879 : — 

The number of immigrants who arrived at this Agency during the year was 12,189, 
against 6,807 in 1878. Of these, 10,848 arrived via Quebec, and 1341 via Halifax. 
9,786 remained in Canada, the balance, som« 2,405, composed of Norwegians, Germans, 
and about 150 Icelanders, passed through on their way to the Western States. 200 
Mennonites and 65 Icelanders are included in the above returns, who joined their friends 
in ilanitoba. 

In addition to the above, 710 souls are reported at the ports of entry in my district, 
making in all 10,500 souls remaining in Canada. 

The immigi-ants who arrived during the year were, generally speaking, of a good class, 
and although there was a large preponderance of mechanics among them, still, all were 
placed, shortly after their arrival, where work could be found. 

Five deaths occurred here during the past season, two being children, two men, and 
one a woman. Independent of these, the immigrants have all been of a healthy class, and 
one and all speak in the highest terms of the treatment they have received from conduc- 
tors and employees of the different railway companies during their journey. 

The amount of capital brought into the country, as far as could be ascertained, 
was some SI 60,000. A large portion of this was brought out by the Mennonites, and 
taken to Manitoba. Of the balance, a part was placed in the banks, while not a small 
share has been invested in the Free Grant Lands of Muskoka. 

In conclusion, I am much pleased to be able to state that, from all information I can 
gather, Ave are likely to have a large increase in our numbers for next season. The visit 
of the British delegates will have great influence in inducing English tenant farmers, 
and others with capital, to make Canada their home. 

The strictest economy has been exercised here during the past year, and the business 
of the Agency has been in every way satisfactory. 

All of which is most respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be, 

Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOHN A. DONALDSON, 

Government Immigration Agent. 

To THE Hon. Arthur S. Hardy, M.P.P. 
Toronto. 



27 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



Statemext shewing the number of immigrants arrived at the Toronto Agency, for 
the twelve months ending 31st December, 1879, and their nationality, the number 
assisted with provisions, and with free passes by railways or other conveyances, from 
this agency to their respective places of destination. 





1 
ia the St. 
e. 






.so 






sisted with 
ises. 


COUNTRY FROM. 




X 

> 




4^ O 
.S OJ 

C.5 

S > 


Si 


o J 

3^ 


II 




< 


< 


H 


(^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


England . , 


5,022 


721 


5,743 


5,743 








Ireland 


1,52G 


316 


1,842 


1,842 










1,280 


106 


1,386 


1,376 














*(10) 








Germany 


194 


29 


223 


173 


50 




6,611 


Norway 


2,344 


117 


2,461 


256 


2,205 


34,090 




Switzerland 


30 


52 


82 


82 




t2,847 




Iceland 


252 




252 


37 


150 






America 








*65 
*200 








!Mennonites . . 


200 I 






Other Couj '. i les .... 










10,848 


1,341 


12,189 


9,784 


2,405 


36,937 


6,611 


Deduct to Manitoba 








275 








Total in Ontario 








9,509 










1 


.. . 





* These parties passed through to Manitoba. 

t Meals supplied to Mennonites, Icelanders and parties passing through to Manitoba at Dominion ex- 
jjense. 



28 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



Statement shewing the total number of immigrants arrived, and remained to be dealt 
with at the Toionto Agency, for the twelve months ending December 31st, 1879. 



January , . 
February . . 

INIarch 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . . 
September 
October , . . 
November 
December 



MONTHS. 



590 
1,424 
1,302 

753 

856 
1,390 
1,200 

760 



42 
168 
332 



220 

472 



275 1,234 



42 

168 

332 

590 

1,424 

1,302 

753 

856 

1,390 

1,200 

980 

472 



9,509 



500 
560 
1,700 
2,430 
3,900 
3,400 
1,800 
2,700 
3,200 
5,500 
4,900 
3.500 



36,937 



5 =3 



98 
100 
259 
512 
722 
876 
586 
664 
656 
965 
748 
425 



34,090 i 6,611 
2,847* 



* Meals supplied to Mennonites, etc. 



Statement shewing the number and destination of Immigrants forwarded from this 
Agency by free passes, for the twelve months ending December, 1879. 



STATIONS. 


Adult 
Passes. 


STATIONS. 


Adult 
Passes. 




7 
1 
2 
2 
10 
3 
1 


Brought forward 




Acton, West 


Arthur 

Aurora 

Baden 

Bala 

Barrie 

Batteaux 


OO 


Ailsa Craig 


13 


Allandale 


n 


Alma 

Alton 


4 

38 


Angus 


13 


Argyle 


3 








Cwt'vied forward 















29 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



STATIONS. 


Adult 
Passes. 


STATIONS. 


1 

1 Adult 
\ Passes 


Brought forviard 


2" 

3 
16 
15 
45 

5 

2 
10 

7 
17 
17 

5 

1 

200 

126 

176 

G5 

2 

8 ' 

3 

« 

5 

3 

3 

1 

1 

80 ; 
97 
11 

8 

5 

2 

2 
38 
19 1 

l\ 

6 


Brought forxcard 


1 




Gravenhurst 


22i 




\ 


BelleviUe 


Guelph 

Hamburg , 

Hamilton 

Haliburton 


45 




9 


Berlin 


718 
1 2 




Bluevale 


1 7 


Blythe 


Hawkstone 


! 2 


Bolton 


1 1 




Hespeler 

Ingersoll 

Kenilworth 

King 

King.ston 

Kincardine 

Kippen 

Kirkfield 


1 3 


Boston Mills 

Both well 


18 
2 


Breslau 

Bracebridge 


8 
98 


Bradford 

Brampton 


20 
1 




2 


Brockville 


3 






6 


Burf ord 




1 


Carleton 


Limehouse 

Lindsay .... . . . 

Listowel 


4 
11 




57 


Caniield , 


1 




London ^ . . . 


948 


Caledon, East 


4 




Lucknow ., 

Malton 


1 


Chatham . ... 


6 


Chat.sworth 


Markham 

Markda e 


3 


Charleston 


6 

12 


Clarkson's Corners 




29 




Manitowaning 

Mildmay 

Milton " ... 


1 


Clifton 


1 


Clinton 


44 


Coboconk 


Mimico 


5 


Colborne 


1 


Cold water 


MitcheU . . 


9 


Cookstown 


67 

4 
3 
1 


Montreal 

Mono Road .... 


10 
16 


Craigvale 


Moorefield 


5 
68 




3 

5 
3 

1 
2 


Newcastle . . .... 


1 


Davenport 


Ne%vmarket ... 


9 
3 


Dorchester 




3 






2 


Dundas 


32 
3 




2 






90 


Dunnville 


1 
9 
3 
4 
-5 


Norval 


13 


Eastwood 


Norwich 

OakviUe 

Orange ville 

Orillia 


4 
16 
28 


Etobicoke 


19 


Ethel 

Exeter 

Fordwich , 


4 

i 

1 \ 
12 i 

9^ 
25 
20 

4 

iJ i! 

34 ii 
1 


Oshawa . . , 

Ottawa 

Owen Sound 

Paris 

Parkhill .... 


11 

9 

37 

24 

1 


Fort Erie i 




15 




Palmerston 


19 


Gait ' 


Parry Sound 


84 






23 


Gilford ! 


Peterboro' 


11 


Glencairn , \ 


Petrolea 

Port Credit 


11 

7« 


Goderich 


Port El.:in 1 


10 


Gore Bay 


Port T 1 pe 


4 






3 








1 


1 


Carried forward 











30 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1800 




STATIONS. 



Brought forward 
Port Stanley 
Preston 
Prescott 
Princeton 

Prince Arthur's Landin 
Ridgeway 
Richmond Hill 
Richwood 
Ripley . . 
Rosseau . . 
Sandwich 

Sarnia 

Scarboro' .... 

Seaf orth 

Severn Bridge 
Silver Islet 

Simcoe 

Shakespeare ...... 

Shelbunie 

Southampton 

Streetsville 

Stoney Point 

St. Catharines 

St. George 

St. Joseph's Island 

St. Mary's 

Stayner 

Stratford 



32 

♦;3 

59 



Carried fontard . 



Adult 
Passes. 



Brought forward 

Strathroy 

Stouffville 

Suspension Bridge 

Thorold 

Thornhill 

Thunder Bay 

Thornbury 

Trenton 

Unionvill« 

Uxbridge 

Waldeniar 

Walkerton . , 

Washago 

Waterloo 

Watford 

Waubaushene 

Weston 

Whitby 

Wick 

Williamsford .... 

Windsor 

Wingham 

Widder 

Woodbridge 

Woodstock 

Wyoming 

Wyebridge 



Total number of Passes 



17 

12 
4 

37 
7 
8 
4 
1 
3 
3 
9 

11 
4 

30 

10 
2 

29 
4 
2 
4 

92 

84 
5 
9 

77 
3 
3 



5,822 



Return shewing the number of immigrants arrived at the port of Toronto, for the year 
ending December 31st, 1879, their nationality, and the value of their effects entered 
at said port. 



NATIONALITY. 


Males. 


Females. 


Children. 


Value of 
Effects. 


English 


55 

24 

4 

51 

44 

16 

5 

2 

' 

1 

2 

1 


60 

30 

5 

55 

55 

18 

4 

5 

1 

1 


53 
12 
17 
30 
55 
36 
13 


S 

8,429 




2,950 


Scotch .... 


3,730 


American 


8,134 


Canadian 


6,819 


(Tcrman 

French 


3,205 
320 


Poles 


178 


Danes 

Hungarian 

British West Indies , . 


1 


510 
10 

250 








1 

205 


234 


217 

1 


34,625 



31 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



Return stewing the number of immigrants arrived at the port of Collingwood for the 
year ending December 31st, 1879, their nationality, and value of their effects entei-ed 
at said port. 



NATIONALITY. 


Males. 


Females. 


Children. 


A^'alue of 
Effects. 


English 

Irish ... ..... 


2 
2 
2 
6 
6 


2 
2 

1 
3 
7 


4 
2 
9 
3 
9 


47 
110 


Scotch 


36 


United StaJ;es ... . , t , 


650 




256 








18 


15 


27 


1,099 



a:n^nual report of john smith, esq., immigration agent, 

hamilton. 

Dominion of Canada Immigration Office, 
Hamilton, January 8th, 1880. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following annual report with the aimexed 
tabular statements for the year ending 31st December, 1879. 

Some of the immigrants arriving at this Agency during the close of the season were 
not of a desirable class, being composed of pensioned soldiers, who were induced to come 
out here on the recommendation of ticket agents interested in the different steamship 
companies. This class of people are entirely unfit for the labour of this country, 
and on their arrival here they are without any means, having their pension in 
advance to enable them to pay for their passage ticket. This practice is confined to the 
steamship companies' agents, as I have not had a single case reported to me arising at the 
instigation of any of the Goverment agents. 

In the early part of the season and during the fall, the immigrants were above 
the general average ^\'ith some few exceptions. Those who had been accustomed to agri- 
cultural pursuits were of a very superior class, for whom employment was readily found 
on their arrival. 

Owing to the depressed state of trade iii Europe, there has been an increase in the 
number of mechanics arriving here, who as a rule have met -with employment, although it 
was attended with difficulties and trouble in obtaining places for them. 

The arrivals for the months of October, November, and December, were unprece- 
dentedly large, and largely in excess of any previous year. During the two latter months 
there has been great trouble in obtaining employment for them, as the season was too far 
advanced. They were induced to come out here on the recommendation of the commis- 
sion ticket agents of the steamship companies. 

S2 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. 1880 



There has been a large increase in the number of factory operatives arriving during 
the season, for which there has been a steady demand at the current rate of wages. 

Owing to the large crop of cereals, there was a good demand for farm labourers 
diU'ing the harvest at a high rate of wages, and a large portion of this class of immigrants 
has met with steady employment. 

There has been a large expenditure upon public works in this district during the 
year, consisting of drainage, canal, and railway construction, which has created a large 
demand for unskilled labour at remunerative wages, the average being from one dollar to 
one dollar and a quarter per day. 

The past year has been one of productiveness to our agriculturists, and there has been 
a good demand for all kinds of produce with increasing prices ; the dairy products partici- 
pating in the general advance, butter and cheese ha\'ing fully i-ecovered from the low 
prices ruling at the opening of the season. 

The export demand for both beeves and sheep has been well sustained at remuner- 
ative prices, and with the increased and improved facilities for shipping, the exports will 
only be limited by the quantity that can be got into condition to meet the growing 
demand. 

There has been a marked difference in the improvement of the stock in this district 
during the past few years, owing to the importation of thorough-breds. Our farmers have 
been able to avail themselves of the benefit of the improved blood at a comparatively small 
cost from the different herds now established in the country. 

The Model Farm at Guelph has been the means of directing and assisting in the 
development of the improvement in the counties adjoining the College, by the judicious 
selections imported by the management, to which the farmers have access. 

In alluding to this subject, our breeders have been able to secure the principal prizes 
at the different competitions held during the past year in the United States, which was 
particularly noticeable at the Chicago International meeting by the number of prizes 
awarded to Canadian stock, being especially so with the long-wooled sheep from the 
Model Farm, purchased and exhibited by Mr. Hood, of Guelph. 

Some of the herds have assumed very large proportions ; that of Mr. Stone, of Guelph, 
numbers near four hundred head, comprised of Shorthorns and Hei'efords, consisting of 
imported and from imported stock, amongst which there is a large number of noted 
animals. 

The herd of Ayrshires imported and owned by Jardine &. Sons, of Hamilton, is the 
finest of its class on the continent, both as to numbers and the excellency of its blood, which 
is duly appreciated not only in Canada, but also in the States, where the herd is period- 
ically exhibited, and so far has withstood all competition. 

The Bow Park Association herd near Brantford is probably the most valuable in the 
world, not only for its magnificent proportions, but also for the nobility of its blood, con- 
sisting of some of the finest forms comprised of Bates', Booth's, Duchess, Oxfords, Wild 
Eyes, Kirklevingtons and other noted and valuable strains. 

There has been a large interest taken in the North-west Territories during the past 
year, a large number having availed themselves of the provisions provided for the settle- 
ment of the public lands. The numerous inquiries through this Agency shews that the 
public mind is being directed from the North-western and the Middle States of the Union 
towards the lands of the Dominion, which has had the effect of closing up the American 
land offices in this city. 

During the year, there has been distributed through this Agency over two thousand 
pamphlets and circulars setting forth the advantages of the Dominion as compared ^\dth 
the States. In addition to this, the information supplied has been the means of inducing 
people from the States to take up homesteads in the North-west Territories. 

The correspondence addres.sed to this Agency during the year has been largely in- 
creased, shewing the interest that is being taken in our unoccupied lands. The number 
of letters received was 1,3.52, and the communication addressed from this office during the 
same period was 1,392. 

Below you will find copies of several letters addressed to this office, shewing the 
nature of the inquiries, and the interest that is being taken ; most of the correspondence 

33 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. 1880 



is of a similar character, shewing how wide-spread the information published by the De- 
partment has reached. 



[copy.] 

Kingsbury, Gaudaloupe Co., 

Texas, May ^5th, 1879. 

Dear Sir, — I wrote you some time ago, asking you if there was any chance of getting 
"work in your locality. 

You adyised me to wait until spring, and said that you had sent on papers descriptive 
of Manitoba. These I neyer received. I guess the U.S. officials kept them up, as they 
want immigrants to settle here. 

I wish you would send me papers about the farming department of the said country. 

I am in a position to buy land if I only saw a suitable place. 

Please to put the papers in a plain envelope and then those parties won't know. 

Yours respectfully, 

Akd. Gilchrist. 



[copy. J 

Kansas City, 

December 1st, 1879. 

Dear Sir, — There is quite a settlement of members at Bird-tail Creek, Manitoba. I 
hear that you could confer upon me a great favour by letting me know how they are suc- 
ceeding there, and how they like their new homes. I have been in Manitoba for fourteen 
months, and am thinking of returning there to settle, as I think a person can do better 
there than on any Free Grant lands to be had in the Union. I find the climate of 
Manitoba ahead of anything in this State, as there are a great many cases of fever and 
ague here, and would advise anyone thinking of emigrating to go over to the North-west 
Territories of Manitoba. 

I am, 

Yours most respectfully, 

J. C. Cope. 

During the early part of the season there was a diminution in the inquiries respect- 
ing the Free Grant lands in the Province of Ontario, which was reversed during the 
summer and fall uonths, as the reports of those already settled ihere have been of a 
favourable charf ijer, which has induced a large number to take up lots in Manitoulin, 
Parry .Sound and Muskoka districts. 

With the means now furnished by the Department for the dissemination of infor- 
mation in regard to the Public Lands, there is reason to anticipate that the migration to 
the United States will receive such a check as will make their agencies in Canada unpro- 
fitable. 

There has been a marked improvement during the past year in industrial and manu- 
acturing interests. There have been many new industries and manufactories opened up in 

34 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) A. 1880 



this district, and the elements of success infused into those already established. This is 
particularly the case ^yith the rolling mills here for the purpose of manufacturing iron, 
also the nail works in connection with tlie same establishment. The Britarinia Company 
from Meriden, Connecticut, U. S., have also erected a factory for the piirpose of manu- 
facturing plated ware, being a new industry in Canada. The Forge Company have 
enlarged their shops to double their former capacity, and are now running night and day 
to keep pace with their orders. 

The Dundas and the Lybster Cotton Mill Companies have both increased their 
capacity, and the mills are now running to their fullest capacity in order to supply the 
demand made upon them and to keep up with their contracts. 

The result of this increased activity has given an impetus to the labour market, and 
has largely tended to the increased population and the influx of people from the United 
States. 

There has been a restored confidence in commercial circles, and with the high prices 
rilling for all kinds of farm produce to supply the foreign demand, I anticipate an 
increased demand for all kinds of labour during the current year. 

From the visits of the agricultural delegates, during the past season, and the 
favourable impression they have formed of Canada, it is anticipated that there will 
be a large influx of tenant farmers, possessed of capital, during the current year. 

By reference to the following statements the work of the Agency is fully ex- 
hibited : — 

Statement A shews the number of immigrants to whom assistance has been granted, 
with the number of meals and lodgings supplied, ^nd as compared with the preceding 
year, a saving of nearly 50 per cent, has been eSected, owing to there being a demand for 
them on arrival. 

Statement B shews the location of the immigrants in this district, a large number 
settling in the County of Wentworth, owing to the new industrial works established 
here. 

Statement D shews the amount of capital that has been reported, shewing an in- 
crease over last year. A large amount of this sum has been invested in the new indus- 
trial works already referred to in a previous part of this report. 

Statements K and L shew the arrivals and the general destination of the immigrants, 
and by the comparative statement submitted, a large increase is shewn in all the different 
nationalities. 

There is great want here of an immigrant shed, the only place that we can shelter 
them is in a tavern, where they are liable to the worst of influences. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

JOHN SMITH, 

Immigration Agent. 

The HcnonrahU the Commissioner of Immigration^ 
Toronto. 



35 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



Statement shewing the total number ot" ImmigranTs arrived, and remained to be dealt 
with at the Haminon Agency, for the twelve monLlis ending 31st December, 1879. 



MONTHS. 



5^ 

















o 


'O . 


<o 


' C.2 


f^ . 






1 rt c3 




ss 




. * 


£o 


s§ 


1 3 


a 

3 


' ^ 


^ 



2 ac 



o 


2 1 




to 




o 






3 




3 




:2; 


1 



12; 



January . . 
February , 
March .... 

Aiiril 

May 

June 

July 

Auc^st . . . 
September 
October . . . 
Xovember 
December . 



Reported through Customs 

" Children's Home," Hamilton . 



37 
76 
101 
371 
494 
426 
348 
378 
4.50 
605 
43.5 
288 



4,009 



211 
211 
353 
667 
807 
675 
683 
814 
495 
264 
522 
428 



248 

287 

454 

1,038 

1,301 

1,101 

1,031 

1,192 

945 

1,369 

957 

716 



172 
267 
528 
808 
896 
542 
639 
817 
848 
1,094 
816 
492 



6,630 



10,639 

935 

24 



11,598 



7,920 



81 


47 


49 


84 


90 


58 


103 


167 


99 


264 


214 


153 


340 


293 


201 


316 


101 


124 


352 


141 


151 


366 


187 


159 


404 


182 


216 


596 


283 


311 


489 


231 


181 


231 


120 


120 



3,626 



2,056 I 1,822 



A. — Statement shewing the number of Immigi-ants assisted, the number of meals and 
lodgings supplied and the number of passes issued by railways and steamboats 
at the Hamilton Agency for the year ending 31st December, 1879. 



1879. 



January 

February , 

March 

Carried fwward 



Xiunber of 
Immigrants. 



89 
107 
130 



Number of 
Passes. 



69 

78 
90 



Number of 
Lodgings. 



47 

90 

167 



Number of 
Meals. 



172 
267 
528 



36 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



1879. 



>J umber of 
Inimio rants. 



Number of Number of 
Passes. Lod^ngs. 



Brought forward 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



Number of 
Meals. 



3.56 
625 
373 
401 
415 
529 
674 
544 
262 



153 
196 
149 
146 
141 
217 
265 
207 
164 



214 


808 


293 


896 


101 


542 


141 


639 


187 


817 


182 


849 


283 


1,094 


231 


816 


120 


492 



4,405 



1,875 



2,056 



r,920 



John Smith, 



Immigration Agent. 



B. — Statement shewing the location of immigrants in the District of the Hamilton Agency 
for the year ending December 31st, 1879. 



COUNTY. 


No. 


COUNTY. 


No. 




113 ' 

6 
378 
320 

27 

11 

9 

267 

250 

142 

12 

16 

18 
262 
200 
199 

17 

12 
106 
108 
226 
005 


Brought forward 


3,604 
497 


Algoma 


Middlesex 

INIuskoka 




297 




Montreal 


15 




j Norfolk 


150 


Cardwell 


Ontario 

Oxford 

Ottawa 

Peel 

Perth 

Renfrew 


99 


Dundas 


368 


Durham 

Essex 

Elgin 


5 

87 

168 




25 






225 




Stormont 


16 




Peterborough 


11 




Victoi'ia 


14 




Welland 


889 




3,836 
364 




Wellington 


Leeds 


Waterloo ^ 

York 


298 
1,.535 


Lincoln 

Kent 


Western States 


12,503 
13,(i96 








Carried fortvard 


3,604 


26,199 



37 



John Smith, 

Immigration Agent. 



43 Yictoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



C. — Statement shewing the destination of Immigrants forwarded by Fr«e Passes from the 
Hamilton Agency for the year ending December 31st, 1879. 




E verett 

Essex Centre 

Exeter 

Elora 

Forest 

Fort Erie 

Fei-gus 

Glenfine 

Glencairn 

Gravenhurst 

Gait 

Guelph 

Glencoe 

Grimsby 

Georgetown 

Garnett 



Carried forward 



38 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 


A 


. 1880 


STATION. 


No. 


STATION. 


No. 


Brought forward 


"308" 1 

7 
13 i 

2 

1 
37 

58 : 
i 


Brought forward 




Toronto 


Winona 


7 


Thorold 


Wingham 


2f 


Tilsonburg 


Waterdown 


3 


Thamesvilie 


Wellington Square 


1 


Trenton 


Willard 


A 


Windsor 


Waterf ord .... ... 


2 


Woodstock 


Woodbridge . 


1 








Carried forward 


1 


1,82.5 




^ 


John Smith, 

Immigration Agent. 



D.— Statement shewing the amount of capital brought into Canada by Immigrants and 
settlers at the Hamilton Agency for the year ending December 31st, 1879. 



January . . 
February . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . 
September 

October 

November 
December . 



MONTH. 



1878. 



$29,000 
22,000 
30,000 
38,000 
27,000 
34,000 
22,000 
18,000 

150,000 
19,000 
27,000 
42,000 



Deer«»,se. 



Total 



$458,000 




39 



John Smith, 

Immiyratiun Ayent. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



E. — Yearly Retukn of the numljer of children of the Hamilton Agency brought out 
by the following societies for the year ending December 31st, 1879. 



SAME OF SOCIETY. 



Rev. Mr. Stephenson, Hamilton. 



Arrived in the year 1879. 



; Boys. 



12 



Girls. 



12 



Total. 



24 



i Number | Xumber 

j in I in 

the Home I the Home 

Dec. 31, I Dec. 31, 

1878. I 1879. 



15 



18 



John Smith, 

Immigration Agent. 



F. — Statement of the number of Immigrants reported at the Port of Hamilton, and the 
value of their effects for the year ending December 31st, 1879. 



262 



Sexes. 



35 


20 


3 


3 


7 


4 


27 


12 


120 


54 


70 


47 



140 



Total. 



50 
3 
5 
IS 
50 
53 



179 



NATIONALITY. 



105 

9 

16 

57 

224 

170 



581 



Value of 
Effects. 



English S500 00 

Irish j 740 00 

Scotch I 1,032 00 

German I 1,368 00 

United States Citizens ■ 13,410 00 

Other Countries ] 10,252 00 

i 

Total j S27,302 00 

John Smith, 

Immigration Agent. 



40 



48 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



G. — Statement shewing the number of Immigrants reported at the Port of Clifton and 
the value of their effects, for the year ending December 31st, 1879. 



Sexes. 


Total. 


NATIONALITY. 










Value of 
Etlects. 


4) 


Females. 


Children 








10 


y 


10 


20 


English 


S c. 
2,861 UU 


^ 


5 


10 


24 


Irish 


562 00 


- 


2 





10 


Scotch 


ISO 00 




•I 

1-J 


2 
10 


y 
31 


German 


COO 00 


y 


United .States Citizens . 


i a(;5 00 


17 


23 


22 


02 




:'.:.ij8 00 




Total 




46 


53 


00 


165 


7,89y 00 









JOUN SillTlI, 

Iminvjridiou Ayent. 



H. — Statement of the number of Immigrants reported at the Port of Foit Erii.' and the 
value of their effects, for the year ending December 31st, 1871.'. 





Sexes. 




Total. 


NATIONALITY. 










Value of 
Effects. 


Male.s. 


Females. 


Children. 




, 














* c. 


15 


18 




33 




2,470 00 




y 
1 





18 
2 




507 00 


1 


Scotch 


125 00 


10 • 


9 




19 


German ' 


SOI O'J 


30 


35 




65 


United States Citizens ... 


1,621 00 


19 


16 




35 


Other Countries . ■ 

Total 


3,055 CO 


84 


88 




172 


ll,57y 00 




■ — ^ — — 





John Smith, 

Immigration Agent. 



41 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



I. — Statement shewing the number of Immigrants reported at the Port of Niagara and the 
value of their effects, for the year ending December 31st, 1879. 



Sexes. 


Total. 


NATIONALITY. 




'i 




Children. 


Value of 
Effects. 


2 


1 

5 




3 

14 




$ c. 
300 00 


9 


Other Countries 


180 00 




Total 




11 


G . 




17 


480 00 



John Smith, 

I iiiiii'uj ration Ay>:)d. 



J . Statement shewing the number of Immigrants and the value of their effects entered 

at the respectiA-e Customs Houses in the District of the Hamilton Agency, for the 
year ending December 31st, 1879. 



NATIONAL IT i^ 


B, 


j: 


;5 


5 


Total. 


Value 
of effects 




s 




c 


1 


















-S c. 


English 


105 


29 


33 





107 


5,834 00 


Irish - 


■J 


24 


18 




51 


1,809 00 




57 


10 
9 


2 
19 





28 
85 


1,337 00 


German 


2,829 00 


U. S. Citizens 


2.1 


31 


05 


3 


323 


18,331 00 


Other countries 


170 


62 


35 


14 


281 


10,055 00 


Total 


587 


105 


172 


1' 


935 


40,195 00 







John Smith, 

JiuiHKjiatioii Ayeid. 



42 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



K.— Yearly Return of ai-rivai and departun- of Immigrants in the District of the 
Hamilton Agency, for the year ending Decemljer 31st, 1879. 



XATIOXALITY. 


6 
1 

s 
1 


1 
•Ji 

1 


5 
5 


Remain in On- 
tario. 


Went to Mani- , 
toba. 1 


si 


English 


2, .596 


5,211 


7,807 


4,237 


129 


3,441 


Irish 


703 


1,548 


2,251 


1,270 


73 


908 




47<) 


1,186 


1,662 


1,007 


41 


C14 


(Jermans 


175 


5,453 


5,628 


1,098 


39 


4,491 


United States Citizens 




3,890 


3,890 


3,332 


558 






83 


4,878 


4,961 


654 


65 


4,242 






Total 1879 ... ... 


4,0:3 


22,166 


26,199 


*11,598 


905 


13,696 


" 1878 


l'307 
2,726 


12,675 


13,982 


7,022 


931 


6,029 






Increase 


9,491 


' 12,217 


i 4,576 




7,667 


Decrease 










26 






1 









* This includes 935 reported through Customs, and 24 children settled by the Rev. Mr. Stephenson, 
The Home," Hamilton. 

John Smith, 

Immigration Agent. 



43 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (ISo. 6.) 



A. 1880 



9? 



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CC 


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44 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



ANNUAL REPORT OF A. G. SMYTH, ESQ,. IMMIGRATION AGENT, 

LONDON, ONTARIO. 

LoNDOx, L'l-th January, 18S0. 

SiE, — I have the honour to submit for the information of the Honourable the Com- 
missioner of Immigration my annual report for the year ending 31st December, 1879. 

1st. Statement shewing the number and nationality of the immigrants who had 
arrived and been dealt with at this agency via the St. Lawrence and the United States. 

2nd. Statement shewdng the monthly arrivals during the same period, the number 
fed and distributed, and the number of free meals furnished. 

3rd. Statement shewing the number and the stations to which immigrants had been 
forwarded. 

4th. A statement of the arrivals through the different ports of entry in my district 
during the year. 

The health of the immigrants arriving at this agency has been unexceptionally good. 

Large numbers have brought considerable means into the country, and expressed 
their intention of purchasing or leasing land at an early day. Numbers have also been 
enabled to send for their families after having been but a short time in the country. 
Good farm hands have been in great demand during the whole season, and the present 
prospect is good for that class the coming season. Very few domestic servants reached 
tliis agency, although tlie demand for them was very great. 

All of which is I'espectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

A. G. SMYTH, 
Govsrnment Immigration Agent. 
David Spence, Esq., 

Secretary, Department of Immigration, 
Toronto. 

Statement shev.-ing the number of Immigrants arrived at the London Agency, for the 
twelve months ending 31st December, 1879, and their Nationality, the number 
assisted with Provisions and with free passes by Railways, or other conveyances, 
from this Agency to their respective places of destination. 













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<; 


< 


H 


P^ 


^ 


'A 


England . 




1,588 

611 

111 

33 


207 


1,795 


1,588 


i 
1 

207 






Ireland . . 




1J5 
58 
45 


720 

IG'J 

78 


638 

148 

40 


88 

21 j 
38 










Scotland 




Germany 








Carried forward 










' i 


1 



















45 



43 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 







13 














_^i 


<u 




c 


r— 


:g 


IS 




'Ji 


a 






•^.9 


o 


? 


^ 




^ 
















j3 






"!! "^ 


t5 




OD 

2 ^ 


COUNTRY FROM. 


•5 <u 


e 




.so 


^ 


■' a: 


K CC 




71 <a 


f . 




-^'o 


+3 


i_c 






t5 ^ 


rrival 
State 


~. 


a CD 






"^ 9 




< 


< 


b- 




> 


^, 


4; 


Norway ... 


'27 


1 


■■A 


12 


■'2 




.^ 
















'i~ 
















I 












? 


Other countrie- 


70 


92 


162 


91 


71 








2,440 


524 


2,964 


2,517 


44.' 


1,477 


. • 865 

i 



A. G. SllYTH, 
Government Iriuuiijration Agent. 



Statement showing the total number of Immigrants arrived, and remained to be dealt 
with at the London Agency, for the twelve months ending 31st December, 1879. 



MONTHS. 



c 


TS 




" 






% 






>A 


2S 








Is 




■t:-i 














'"' 


^ 


-~ 



.Tanuarj- . . 
February . 
March — 

April 

May 

.Tune 

■Tuly 

August. . 
September 
October , . 
November 
December 



74 
103 
191 
262 
270 
197 
228 
210 
339 
323 
20 5 



2,440 



11 
18 
23 
30 
20 
15 
33 
62 
72 
124 
81 
35 



.524 



51 
92 
126 
221 
282 
285 
230 
290 
2S2 
463 
404 
238 



12 

40 

57 

126 

171 

133 

96 

144 

115 

273 

216 

94 



2,964 I 1,477 



11 

22 

29 

32 

70 
128 

58 

95i 

47 
127 
19U 
78i 



889i = 865 



46 



A. G. Smyth, 
Government Immigration Agent. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



Statement slie%ving the number and destination of Immigrants forwarded from this 
Agency by free passes, for the Twelve jNIonths ending 31st December, 1879. 



STATIONS. 



Adult 
Passes. 



STATIONS. 



Adult 
Passes. 



Behiiont 

Elginfield . . . . 
Pt. Stanley 
Chatham .... 
Aylmer . . . . . 
Woodslee . . . 

Ilderton 

Stratfoi-d . . . 
Thunder Bay . 
Thamesville . . 
St. Thomas . . 

Widder 

Essex Centre 

Toronto 

Centralia 

Guelph 

Mandaumm . 

Brecon 

Petrolea 

Pond Mills... 

Clinton 

Fergus , 

Ingersoll 

Windsor ... . 
Hamilton . . . 
Walkerton . . 

Ottawa 

Woodstock . . . 
Camlachie . . . 
Ailsa Craig . . 

Watford 

Komoka 

Mt. Brydges . 
Thorndale . . . 

Both well 

Ely the 

Strathroy . . . 
Dorchester . . 

Inwood 

Clandeboye . 
(jrlanworth . . 



1 
1 

85 

1 

s 

18 

3 

12 

15(; 
1 

Hi 
2Si 

S 
31 

1 
23 
17 

3 

6 

1 

7 

11 

1 

4 

t; 

5 

5^ 
4 
7 
4 
25 

15 
14 

6 

3 

5 



Fletcher . 

Forest 

Hensall 

Sarnia 

Cobourg .... 

Newbury 

Charing Cross 

Kerwood 

Londesborough 

Brantford 

Tilbury 

Prince Arthur's Landing 

Belle River ... 

Wingham 

Appiu 

Quebec 

Longwood 

Granton 

Lucknow 

Paris 

London Township .... 

Dundas 

Amherstburg . . 

Wyoming 

Lucan 

Listowel 

Tilsonburg 

Ridgetown 

Exeter 

Stoney Point 

Parkhill 

St. Mary's 

lona 

Goderich 

Hyde Park 

St. Catharines 

Dutton 

St. Johns 



Total. 



12 
2 

1 

17 
Ok 

■m 

9" 
1 

u 

8.\ 



10 
1 
1 

20 



4 

17 

3 



S65 



A. G. Smyth, 
Govermntnt Iminiy ration Agent. 



47 



4:3 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 6.) 



A. 1880 



Dominion of Canada Immigration Office, 

London, 1880. 



Return of Settlers, and the value of their effects, arriving at the Ports of Sarnia, 
Amherstburgh, Windsor, London, St. Thomas and Port Stanley, and Goderich, from 
1st January, 1879, to 31st December, 1879. 















IB 






















!D 






















'S 












































c 














1 


^ 






3 




OJ 


5 








(— 






-s 






*"-? 


— 






1 


5 

i 


% 

s 


^ 

^ 


Sl 


0) 


^ 

S 


1 


Q 
























S 


Sarnia 


675 


448 


56 


64 


21 


86 


185 


181 


309 


28,304 




171 


49 


31 


IS 


30 


43 


06 


.59 


46 


9,230 




oGo 
No pa 


240 


50 


pt, on 


2'J 

ly ^al 


246 

lie . . . 


164 


191 


210 



33,539 


London 

St. Thomas and \ 


16,165 














15,397 


Port Stanley i 





































_ 





2 900 






1 










1411 


737 


137 


91 


71 


375 


515 


431 


565 


105,535 



A. U. Smyth, 
Uocemintnt I iiinivjratLvn Agent. 



48 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 7.) A. 1880 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC WORKS 



FOR THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO, 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING 31st DECEMBER 



1879. 



p?uutnl I»0 (BxAtv of tlt^ '§tqUUrm '^$mnh\\j. 




olorauto : 

PRINTED BY C. BLACKETT ROBINSON, 5 JORDAN STREET. 

1880. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 7.) A. 1880 



CONTENTS. 



Commissioner's Report 5 

Report of the Architect, etc 7 

Report of the Engineer 11 

Statements of Accountant and Law Clerk 19 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 7.) A. 1880 



EEPOET 



OP THE 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC WORKS, 

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO, 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31st DECEMBER, 1879. 



To His Eoiiowr, the Honourable Donald Alexander Macdonald, Lieutenant- 
Governor of the Province of Ontario, d'c, c&c. 

In compliance with the Act in that behalf, 1 beg to submit the following Report of 
the works under the control of this Department, for the year 1879. 

The operations connected with the additions and improvements to the Public 
Institutions were continued during the year, and with trifling exceptions, the arrangements 
for accommodation of the inmates of these Institutions may be considered as complete 
and eflScient in all respects. 

The construction of new slides and dams for the improvement of navigation, and 
facilitating the passage of timber and saw logs from the Muskoka and Gull River sections 
has been also been proceeded with during the past season, and the locks, bridges, <fec., 
on the navigable portions of the inland waters have been repaired and improved. 

The details of construction and repairs to Public Buildings and Works are explained 
in the accompanying Reports of the Architect and Engineer of the Department. 

The drainage of swamp lands is still being largely continued throughout the Province, 
not as formerly under the direct supervision and control of the Government, but through 
the machinery of the Township Councils, to whom, on their drainage debentures, loans are 
being made by the Province from the fund set apart for that purpose under the provisions 
of "The Ontario Municipal Drainage Aid Act." 

A very considerable progress has been made during the year towards the completion 
of the railways which had received Government aid and were in course of construction ; 
and the additional railway facilities and connections thus secured cannot but tend largely 
to the further development of our great and increasing Provincial resources. 



• 43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 7.) A. 1880 



I cannot refrain from expressing my great regret at the sudden and unexpected 
death, in April last, of Mr. Thos. K Molesworth, the Chief Engineer of the Department. 
I do but scant justice when I say that he had proved himself an able, efficient and 
trustworthy officer, and had always performed his departmental duties to my complete 
satisfaction, and with a single regard to the public interests. 



Respectfully submitted. 



Department op Public Works, 

Ontario, 31st December, 1879. 



C. F. FRASER, 

Commissiooier, etc 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 7.) A. 1880 



REPORT 



OP 

THE ARCHITECT, ETC, 



Department op Public Works, Ontario, 

Toronto, December 31st, 1879. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following Annual Report : — 

GOVERNMENT HOUSE. 

The buildings were thoroughly repaired, the outside wood work was painted, and 
additional furniture and furnishings supplied, preparatory to the occupation of the 
residence by His Excellency the Governor-General and H.R.H. Princess Louise 
during the early part of September last. 

The conservatory and gi*een house were also repaired and painted, these buildings 
and grounds being now in complete order. 

The usual appropriation for general repairs during the ensuing year will be required 

PARLIAMENT AND DEPARTMENTAL BUILDINGS. 

The ordinary repairs to these buildings have been made during the year, the 
expenditure having been charged to the .contingencies of each Department. 

The grounds have been kept in good order, the expense for which was also 
charged to each Department. 

The want of Committee Rooms during the Sessions of the Legislature, and 
apartments for clerks in the Departmental Buildings is much felt, and additional 
accommodation is much required. 

If the occupation of the centre portion of the Parliament Buildings is to be continued 
much longer, it will be necessary to have new roofs constructed over the Legislative 
Chamber and Library, as the framing, having been constructed several years ago on a 
wrong principle, indicates symptoms of yielding to the pressure from the weight 
of the slate, gravel, &c., the span being greater than ordinary, but not excessive if 
constructed on scientific principles. From a recent examination with the carpenter I 
can state that the timber, when tested, was found to be sound, and by the introduction of 
some braces and supports, the roofs may be relied on as being quite safe, care being taken 
every winter to have the snow removed as soon as possible after a heavy fall. Arrangements 
have been made with a contractor for several years past for the purpose. 

In my Annual Report of 187.3, I pointed out the necessity of "providing more 
extensive and secure edifices for the Legislature, and the convenience of the several 
Departments." 

I also stated in 1876, that "on sanitary considerations, these old buildings were very 
objectionable," and that " with the defective drainage, and the want of proper ventilation, 
it was quite impossible to guarantee the health of the occupants of any of the ofiices, 
or the Members of the Legislature for a single day, though every precaution was and 
would be observed to prevent serious results." 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 7.) A. 1880 



In addition to the above, I can now state that the lapse of six years has onlj 
strengthened my opinion as to the necessity of providing new Parliament and Departmental 
Buildings. 

ASYLUM FOR THE INSANE, TORONTO. 

The airing verandahs at the east and west ends of the corridors of the main building, 
and at the south ends of both wings, were thoroughly repaired and painted. The upper 
floors of the verandahs at the ends of the main building have not been repaired since the 
Asylum was erected, until this year. The repairs wex'e much required, a portion of the 
cost having been charged to maintenance. 

The sewer on Queen Street has been constructed by the City, and will be available 
for the drainage of the Asylum property, the depth having been increased for the purpose. 
Measurements were made whilst the work on the sewer was in progress, so as to ensui-e 
a proper fall from the drains round the buildings. 

ASYLUM FOR THE INSANE, LONDON. 

The fences round the airing yards in the rear of the refractory ward building 
were constructed, and alterations made in the wood sheds in the farm yard, the one on 
the west side having been changed to an ice house, and on the east for a waggon house. 

Appropriations will be required for sheds in the airing yards for the use of the 
refractory ward patients, and for the improvement of the grounds round the building, 
the principal portion of the labour will be done by the patients, the appropriation being 
only required for the purchase of sodding and hauling gravel. 

The I'oofs over the water closets, which were constructed after the main building 
was erected, will have to be repaired, the galvanized iron requir-ing renewal. 

ASYLUM FOR THE INSANE, HAMILTON. 

The wings were occupied in the early part of the summer, and the whole of the 
works under contract were fully completed this year. 

The Asylum drains were connected with the City sewer on Queen Street, the 
arrangement being quite satisfactory in working since the connection was made. 

The Bursar's, Engineer's and Farmer's residences, being isolated and removed from 
the main building, the drains round the Asylum could not be made available for drains 
from the cellars of the residences, except at considerable cost. It will be necessary, 
therefore, to construct drains to the face of the hill, the rock not having been found 
sufficiently open to carry off the surface water which floods the cellars. As the two former 
residences are close to the edge of the hill the cost will be trifling, and as the drains will 
only carry ofl" surface water, there can be no nuisance. 

ASYLUM FOR THE INSANE, KINGSTON. 

There has been no expenditure on account of the appropriation for extending the 
water supply pipe to the crib work of the wharf outside the line of the lake shore, to 
ensure a more abundant and purer supply of water, as it was presumed that the pipe at 
the engine house of the Toronto Asylum, which is not now required, would be available 
for the purpose ; but owing to the uncertainty of the supply from the Toronto City 
Water Works, it was deemed prudent to delay the dismantling of the Toronto engine- 
house. 

ASYLUM FOR IDIOTS, ORILLIA 

The fences round the grounds recently purchased were completed in the early part 
of the year. 

An appropriation will be required for the renewal of the front verandahs which 
were constructed in 1860. 

8 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 7.) A. 1880 



CENTRAL PRISON, TORONTO, 

Plans and specifications were prepared for the rebuilding of the Foundry which 
was injured by fire as reported last year, and tenders were received after due 
advertisement, the lowest being that of Mr. J. Forin, Belleville, by whom the work has 
been done. An additional storey was constructed, thereby affording double the space for 
a workshop on the second floor, the roof being flat and covered with galvanized iron. 

The work was completed and occupied as a broom shop, early in October last. 

DEAF AND DUMB INSTITUTE, BELLEVILLE. 

The expenditure on account of work at this Institution has been of a trifling 
character, consisting of the completion of the work connected with the steam heating 
and general repairs. 

BLIND INSTITUTE, BRANTFORD. 

Arrangements were made in the early part of the season for the construction of 
a hot water heating apparatus for the Principal's residence, and the work has been 
satisfactorily done for less than the amount of the appropriation. 

The Principal occupied the residence during the summer, and the apartments 
vacated in the Institution were fitted up for the accommodation of additional pupils. 

An appropriation for general repairs will be required. 

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE, GUELPH. 

Plans and specifications for a rear addition for store rooms, enlargement of the 
kitchen, <kc., were made early in the year, and tenders were received after duo 
advertisement, that of Messrs. Dobbie & Grierson, Guelph, being the lowest, and to 
them the work was awarded. The work was completed in a satisfactory manner in 
time for the arrangement of the apartments before the expiration of the vacation, 
and the improvements are a great advantage to the domestic portion of the Institution. 

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT AND NORMAL SCHOOL, TORONTO. 

The expenditure on account of this building has been for ordinary repairs to 
fences, out-buildings, furnaces, &c. 

NORMAL SCHOOL, OTTAWA. 

There has been a moderate expenditure for repairs, Jrc, to this building, including 
some changes in the heating pipes. 

Plans and specifications for the construction of the Model School, to complete 
the original design of the building, were prepared and tenders received after due 
advertisement. That of Messrs. Lyons &, Robillard, Ottawa, being the lowest, was 
accepted, and they have progressed with the various works in a satisfactory manner during 
the season. 

The walls have been built to the level of the string course under the windows of the 
second storey, and the play sheds in the rear have been built. The work has been 
covered up for the winter, and the foundations are protected from frost. 

The whole of the work will be completed during the next season, and can be occupied 
after the summer vacation. 

OSGOODE HALL, TORONTO. 

The ordinary repairs to the buildings have been of a trifling character, and some 
additional furniture has been supplied as required for the various offices. 

9 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 7.) A. 1880 



ALGOMA DISTRICT. 

An appropriation having been made for the erection of a Lock-up at Gore Bay, 
Manitoulin Island, plans and specitications for a stone building similar to those erected at 
Manito\Yaning and Little Current, were prepared, and tenders received after due 
advertisement. The tender of the Law Building and Manufacturing Company, Meaford, 
being the lowest, was accepted. 

The work has progressed in a satisfactory manner during the summer under the 
superintendence of a Clerk of Works, who reported the completion of the building in 
October last. 

There has been no expenditure on account of repairs for the buildings in the 
Nipissing and Muskoka Districts, and but slight expenditures for furniture, &c., for the 
Thunder Bay and Parry Sound Districts. 

ANDREW MERCER REFORMATORY FOR FEMALES. 

The work was resumed in the Spring when the weather permitted, and has been 
continued during the season. 

The whole of the buildings are now roofed in and enclosed, the plastering and 
other internal work being in progress. 

There was some delay in the supply of bricks during the early part of the season, 
which has retarded the completion of the work as expected, but if there are no further 
impediments, the building will be ready for occupation before the end of June next, the 
several contractors being now actively employed in completing the internal woi'k. 

The main drain is now being constructed from the buildings through the Central 
Prison grounds to the Asylum sewer, the fall being found sufficient for the purpose. 
The excavation will be made by Central Prison labour, and the bricks are supplied by the 
Central Prison industries, and laid by the contractor for the brick work of the 
Reformatory at schedule rates. 

The gas mains have been extended to the building by the City Consumers' Gas 
Company, and arrangements will be made with the City Water Works for the extension 
of their mains along King Street from the Central Prison branch, to the Reformatory, for 
the supply of water to the building. 

The fences round the airing-yards are nearly completed, and the levelling of the 
surface round the buildings and in the yards will soon be finished by Central Prison 
labor. 

The iron work of the cell gates and the guards for the windows has also been done 
by the labour of the prisoners, the iron having been purchased for the purpose. 

The steam heating which will be on the low pressui-e principle, is now being 
rapidly pushed forward by the contractors, W. J. McGuire & Co., whose tender was 
accepted, being the lowest of those received after due advertisement. 

Two steam boilers for heating, a high pressure boiler for steam cooking, and a hot 
water boiler for baths, wash basins, <fec., have been placed in the boiler house, and will 
soon be set by the bricklayers. 

I have the honour to remain, 

Your obedient servant, 

KIVAS TULLY, 

Architect, etc. 
Hon. C. F. Fraser, 

Commissioner of Public Works, 
Ontario. 



10 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 7.) A. 1880 



REPORT 



OF 



THE EJSraiNEER 



OF 



PUBLIC WOEKS. 



Department of Public Works, Ontario, 

Toronto, 31st December, 1879. 

SiR^ — I have the honour to submit the following Report on the construction and 
maintenance of Public Works, and extension of Railways and drainage works throughout 
the Province during the year ending this 31st day of December, A.D. 1879. 

MUSKOKA RIVER WORKS. 

The constructions, improvements and repairs made to these works this year are as 
foUows : — • 

The dam and slide at the " High Falls" on the south branch of the Muskoka River 
have been completed. The slide is about 1100 feet in length and 5 feet in depth, with 
a bottom width of 5| feet and a top width of 9 feet. 

The descent from the upper to the lower level is 100 feet, and it is built in a straight 
line from end to end. 

The dam is 91 feet in length and 12 feet in width, with two stop log openings 21 
feet in width, and a sluice for slide 9 feet in width. 

Prior to the construction of these works great damage was annually caused to logs 
and timber in transit on the river, by breaking and chafing on the jagged rocks on the 
bottom and sides of these falls. 

Some slight repairs have also been made to the dam at the foot of Mary's Lake, and 
it has been pro\'ided with three new stop logs, new windlasses and chains. 

A re-vote of the unexpended balance of this year's appropriation will require to be 
taken for 1880, in order to complete the works projected in this connection. 

At Muskos Falls there are two outlets of Lake Muskoka, at which stop log darns were 
built for the purpose of reserving the water of the lake for milling and navigation 
purposes. One dam has five openings 28 feet in width, and the other has two openings 
of the same width. There is also a queen truss bridge below the long dam. 

Complaints are frequently made by the settlers of land being flooded in the spring 
of the year, in consequence of the channel at Bala not being large enough to allow the 
flood water to pass away, and works necessary to prevent a continuance of this damage 
have been asked for. 

In connection with the Bala works, there will require to be 3 cribs built, 12 feet 
square and 16 feet in height, and about 500 feet of double boom chained to cribs, to 
prevent the logs and timber from running through the long dam, as the pier of the bridge- 
is just below and in danger of being injured or knocked away by the timber. 

11 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 7.) A. 1880 



MARY'S AND FAIRY LAKES' WORKS. 

The following improvements and repairs have been made to these works this year : 

The breastwork below the lock having been overturned by a jam of logs, and washed 
across the canal this spring, Avas rebuilt. It was also raised two feet higher, and made 
five feet six inches wider at the base, and the bottom of the canal was cleaned out. 

The crib at Fetterly's Mill, above the lock, was also leaking badly, and had to be 
cleaned out, refilled with clay and well puddled, so as to make it water-tight and prevent 
the gravel from washing out of it. 

Several shoals were also dredged out of the river above the lock. 

At Huntsville a new queen truss bridge with braces has been built, 70 feet span, and 
the centre pier of the old bridge removed from the river. Several improvements were 
also made to the approaches, and the whole structure raised two feet higher than the old 
bridge. 

Some loose stone and boulders were also removed out of the river, below the bridge. 

The improvements and repairs that will be required at these Works in 1880 are as 
follows : — 

A breastwork below the lock 260 feet in length, to prevent the sand and gravel from 
washing into the canal from the bank of the river. 

The canal will also require to be cleaned out, and some dredging done in the river a 
short distance below the lock. 

There is also an old cofferdam in the river above the lock which will require to be 
removed. 

CUT AND BRIDGE AT PORT SANDFIELD. 

This cut is between Lakes Joseph and Rosseau, and will require to be dredged, as 
the water is now so shallow, that the steamboats have great difficulty in passing through 
it. The bridge will also require some extra bracing and other repairs. 

GULL AND BURNT RIVER WORKS. 

The works constructed under this head this year and the repairs made are as 
follows : — 

At Devil's Creek the work performed consists of a new dam, 125 feet long, and 20 
feet wide, with a slide 40 feet in length and 6 feet 6 inches in width, and an apron 20 feet in 
length, and 10 feet in width. 

On Bear Creek above the lower marsh a pier has been built, 48 feet in length, 6 feet 
in width, and 5 feet in height, for the purpose of contracting the water over the 
rapids and preventing it overflowing the low, flat land on the adjacent banks. 
Two slides between this pier and the foot of the " Big Marsh" have been slightly repaired, 
and raised one foot higher this year. 

Otter Lake dam below the outlet of Otter Lake, on Lot 25, in the 14th concession 
of Monmouth, has been gravelled, and some other slight repairs made thereto. 

Grace Lake dam has been provided with some new stop logs, and the planking of 
the slide repaired. 

Some gravelling was done and other slight repairs made to two pile-dams at Red- 
stone Lake, in the township of Guilford. 

The dam at the outlet of Oblong Lake has been gravelled and supplied with some 
new stop logs. 

Crab Lake dam and slide at the outlet of Crab Lake in the Township of Sherborne 
was built early in the spring of 1879, for the purpose of reserving the water of the lake 
and to facilitate the driving of the timber down the river. 

The dam is 89 feet long, and 20 feet wide, and the slide is 40 feet in length and 20 
feet in width, with an apron 70 feet in length, and 20 feet in width constructed of round 
logs. 

Paint Lake dam has been supplied with some new stop logs. 

Hawk Lake dam, in the Township of Stanhope, was built in the fall of 1878 for the 
purpose of reserving the waters of Hawk Lakes. A slide, 40 feet in length and 20 feet 

12 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 7.) A. 1880 



in width, and an apron constructed of round logs, 30 feet in length and 24 feet in width, 
have been built to it this year. 

Horse Shoe Lake dam, on the Gull river, in the Township of Minden, has been 
gravelled, and supplied with 4 new stop logs this year. 

Dam and Slide at Workman's Mills. — This dam has been supplied with new stop logs, 
and the slide has been lengthened 80 feet, to facilitate the running of timber over the falls. 
The crib-work on the North side of the slide was also lengthened 43 feet and some broken 
planking repaired in the slide. Some blasting was also done at the falls below. 

At Racketty Creek, the outlet of Bob Lakes, there has been a slide built 420 feet in 
length and 5 feet 4 inches in width. There has also been two dams built at the top of the 
slide for the purpose of blocking up the channels of the creek, and forming a basin to 
receive the timber before entering the slide. A quantity of loose rock had to be 
removed and some blasting done during the progress of these works, which are situated 
on Lot No. 13 in the 12th Concession of Lutterworth. 

Dam and Slide at Elliott's Fall's, Gull River. — Some slight repairs have been made 
to the slide, and the dam has been furnished with some new stop logs. 

Keneses Lake dam and the dam at Norland, on the Gull River, have also been 
supplied with new stop logs. 

In connection with the Gull and Burnt River waters, appropriation!-: will be required 
in 1880, for the following woi'ks : — 

The dam at the outlet of Redstone Lake will require to be re-built. The present slide 
could be made use of with a few repairs. 

Two pile-dams on Lot No. 30, in the 8th Concession of Guilford, will require to be 
re-built. These dams prevent the water of Redstone Lake from running into Eagle Lake. 

The dam at the foot of Hall's Lake, requires an apron and other slight repairs. 

A new pile-dam will require to be built at the outlet of Oblong Lake, and the stop 
log dam will require to be repaired. 

The dam at the outlet of Horse Shoe Lake requires an apron along the back, to 
prevent the water from washing the gravel from under the foundations and some of the 
cribbing requires planking. 

The Slide at Elliott's Falls, on the Gull River, requires lengthening, on account of 
the unevenness of the rock below ; the cribwork, a distance of 30 feet, and the planking, a 
distance of 50 feet. 

The dam at Fenelon Falls requires gravelling, and some repairs made to the planking. 
The crib- work of the slide is also much worn in some places, and will require to be re-built. 

MAINTENANCE OF LOCKS, DAMS AND SWING BRIDGES. 

In the estimates for this year, provision was made for partial re-construction and 
extensive repairs to be made to the Swing bridges at Lindsay and Young's Point, but 
upon examination it was found that the timbers were so decayed, that it would be impos- 
sible to repair them. Two new bridges were therefore built at Lindsay, and one at 
Young's Point, and as the appropriation was not sufficient to cover the expense of re-building 
the bridge over the Scugog river south of Lindsay, it w-as slightly repaired and adjusted, 
but it is now entirely worn out, and will require to be re-built in 1880. The guard-piers 
both above and below this bridge will also require considerable repairs. 

The swing bridge at Port Carling was adjusted and supplied with new truss rods to 
the centre beam, and rollers under the ends of the bridge. Some of the planking of the 
lock was also repaired. 

The swing bridge at Rosedale on the Balsam river was adjusted, and the dam was 
gravelled and supplied with some new stop logs. Some repairs were also made to the 
booms. 

Some new timbers were put on the dam at Young's Point, and some planking done. 
The slide was also repaired with some new planking and cross sills, and some slight re- 
pairs made to the pier and platform above the lock. 

A sunken pier was taken out up the river and some repairs made to the lock gates. 

The recess for the lower gates of the Lindsay lock was cleaned out, and some slight 
repairs made to it and also to the lock at Rosedale on the Balsam river. 

13 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 7.) A. 1880 



The following improvements and repairs will be required on these works in 1880. 

A new swing bridge will require to be built over the Scugog river, south of 
Lindsay, and the present guard piers repaired. 

The cribwork extending along the edge of the Scugog river, below the Lindsay lock, 
will be required to be repaired, and the apron of the dam requires planking. 

At Young's point there will be two piers required up the river above the canal, 20 
feet square and 18 feet high, for the purpose of preventing the boats and scows from 
breaking the present boom and going over the dam. 

There are also three piers required below the lock, 16 feet squai'e and 12 feet in 
height, and about 300 feet of double boom, to prevent the steamers and barges from being 
driven on shoals and rocks by the strong current below the entrance to the lock. 

DRAINAGE WORKS. 

During the present year applications have been made, and aid granted to the follow- 
ing Townships under the " Ontario Municipal Drainage Aid Act," viz : — 

Ekfrid, Lakefield, Moore, Southwold, Dunwich, Colchester, Sidney, Thurlow, Brooke, 
Eldon, Plympton, Romney, Warwick, Tilbury East and West, Euphemia, Howard, Dawn, 
Raleigh, Mariposa, Howick, Turnberry, Dover, Keppel, Bruce and Rochester, and 
applications are still being sent in. 

Drainage works are being vigorously prosecuted by these different municipalities, 
and the drains constructed have in many instances rendered lands fit for cultivation, 
■which prior to their construction were entirely useless. 

EXTENSION OF RAILWAYS IN 1879. 

Construction works have been in progress during the present year on eight new 
lines of railway throughout the Province, having a total length of about 407 miles. 
Two of these lines have been completed and opened for traffic during the same period. 
Six of these Railways have been previously reported on as in construction. The works 
on these not reported on have been commenced during the present year. They are, — 

1. The Huron and Ei'ie Railway. 

2 The Georgian Bay and Wellington Railway. 

All the railways in construction during the year are to have the 4 feet 8^ inch 
guage. 

The details of the works on the several lines in construction in 1879, so far as 
known, are as follows : — 

Credit Valley Railway. 

The construction of this line was commenced in 1873, and the work has been 
steadily progressing ever since. Early in 1878 a portion of it, extending from Wood- 
stock to Ingersoll, a distance of ten miles, was completed, and the work has been so 
vigorously pushed since, that the entire line is now completed and open for traffic. 

The main line extends from Toronto to Ingersoll, a distance of about 94^^ miles, with a 
branch line from Streetsville to Orangeville, 35 miles in length, and a branch from 
Cataract Junction, in the Township of Caledon, to Elora, a distance of about 27| miles. 
The total length of the Railway is therefore in excess of 150 miles, and the line is laid 
■with steel rails throughout. It is the intention of the Company to extend the main line 
from Ingersoll to St. Thomas, a distance of 26 miles. The work, however, has not been 
commenced yet, but it is expected that it will be completed before the close of 1880. 

Grand Junction Railway. 

The construction of this railway was commenced in 1871, and twenty miles, extend- 
ing from Belleville to Stirling were completed ia 1874. During the present year the line 
has been completed from Stirling to Hastings, a distance of 24.32 miles, and I am 
informed that the Company intend to make a further extension of 20.68 miles to 
Peterboro, from which point it will form a competing line Avith the Midland Railway. 

14 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 7.) A. 1880 



Midland Railway. 

An extension ten miles in length, extending from Waubaushene to the Wye river, 
was completed on this Railway in 1878, and some grading was done between the Wye 
river and its Northern terminus at Midland Village. This portion has been completed 
and opened for traffic during the present year. The distance being 4.53 miles. 

Prince Edward County Railway. 

Construction works wei'e commenced on this railway in 1878, and about 14 miles of the 
line were gi'aded before the close of the year. The entire line from its northern terminus 
at Trenton on the G. T. R., to its southerly terminus at Picton in Prince Edward County, 
a distance of 32 miles, has since been completed and opened for traffic. 

Canada Central Railvxiy. 

The Canada Central may be considered an extension of the Brockville and Ottawa 
Railway. It has been open for traffic as far as Renfi-ew for some years. A portion of 
it extending from Renfrew to Pembroke, a distance of 34.56 miles, were completed and 
opened for traffic in 1876, and a further extension, 135 miles in length, is now under con- 
struction, of which, I am informed, a length of 55 miles have been graded, 44 miles of 
track laid, and 30 miles ballasted. 

Stratford and Lake Huron Railway. 

This railway was opened for traffic in 1878 from Stratford to Listowel, a distance of 
27.50 miles. Its extension from Listowel to Wiarton, a distance of 78 miles, is now 
in progress, and I am informed that a considerable amount of grading and other work 
has been done along the whole line, but no iron has yet been laid. 

The length of this line when completed will, therefore, be 105.50 miles. 

Huron and Erie Railway. 

This railway commences at Rond Eau Harbour, in the County of Kent, and continues 
from thence to Blenheim, Chatham and Dresden, with a branch to Wallaceburg, 11 miles 
in length. It is the intention of the Company to extend to the G. T. R., via Petrolia,, to 
either Sarnia or Forest, a distance of about 60 miles. The road, as projected, will there- 
fore be 7 1 miles in length, 40 miles of which, I am informed, is already graded and ready 
for track-laying. 

The work was commenced in the early part of this year, and it is expected that the 
entire line will be completed and opened for traffic in 1880. 

Georyian Bay and Wellington Railway. 

The construction works on this Railway were commenced during the summer of the 
present year. The portion now under construction commences at the G. W. Railway at 
Pabnerston, and extends to Durham, a distance of 26 miles. 

The grading, bridging and fencing are nearly completed, and track laying and ballast- 
ing will shortly commence. 

It is intended to extend the line to Owen Sound, a distance of 33 miles, the work on 
which will probably commence during the present winter. 

The line when completed will thei-efore be 59 miles in length. 

It will be seen from the details given that the total length of Railways completed, 
ready for traffic, in the Province during 1879, is, as nearly as may be, 208.10 miles. 

MILEAGE OF RAILWAYS. 

A statement in the report of 1878, gave in detail the mileage on each Railway in 
Ontario, distinguishing between those constructed prior to and after Confederation. 
I, therefore, conclude my report with a revised statement to the close of 1879. 

15 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 7.' 



A. 1880 




I 



»HrHrHi-HTHr-(rHi-HrHT-l(NWMe<ltN(MIMC<IC<lMCOC<0MCOe<5CO 



16 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 7.) 



A. 1880 



rrt 1 . 


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17 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 7.) A. 1880 



It will be seen from the above statement that the total length of Railways con- 
structed since Confederation is 1946-96 miles. Of these a length of 1410-66 miles have 
been aided by the Province of Ontario. 

I have the honour to remain, 

Your obedient servant, 

ROBT. McCALLUM, 

Engineer Public Works. 
The Hon. C. F. Frasee, 

Commissioner of Public Works, 
Ontario. 



I 



18 



i 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 7.) A. 1880 



STATEMENTS 



OF 



ACCOUNTANT AND LAW CLEEK. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 7.) 



A. 1880 



No. 1. — Expenditure for Fuel, Gas, Water, Repairs, &c., by the Department 
of Public Works, during 1879. (Part of Maintenance Accounts). 



NAME OF WORK. 



Expenditure 
for 1879. 



Government House , 

Executive Council's and Attorney-General's Offices 

East Wing, Parliament Buildings 

Department of Public Works 

Crown Lands Department 

Parliament Buildings, Centre 

Osgoode Hall, Toronto 

School of Practical Science 

Maintenance of Locks and Dams 

Total 



$ cts. 
5,559 89 

349 13 
3,010 93 

396 74 
1,284 50 
6,344 08 
8,083 50 

541 99 
5,671 36 



$31,242 12 



F. T. JONES, 

Accountant. 



Department of Public Works, 

Toronto, 1st January, 1880. 



21 



43 Yictoria. 



Sessional Papers (No* 7.) 



A. 1880 



No. 2. — Statement of the Expenditure on Public Works in 1879, and Total 
Expenditure thereon up to 81st December, 1879. — Capital Account. 



NAME OF WORK 



Government House 

Parliament and Departmental Buildings and Grounds 
Asylum for the Insane, Toronto 

Do London 

Do Hamilton 

Do Orillia 

Do Kingston 

Deaf and Dumb Institute, Belleville 

Blind Institute, Brantf ord 

Central Prison, Toronto 

Andrew ^Mercer Eefonnatory 

Reformatory, Penetanguishene 

Registry Office and Gaol, Bracebridge 

Court House and Gaol, Sault Ste. Marie 

Registry Office, do 

Government Farm, Mimico 

Agricultural College and Farm, Guelijh 

School of Practical Science, Toronto 

Do do New Building . . . 

Normal and Model Schools, Toronto 

Registry Office and Lock-up House, Parry Sound 

Do do Thunder Bay . . . 

Registry Office at Minden 

Lock-up at Silver Islet, Lake Superior 

Do Mattawan, Nipissing District 

Three Lock-ups, Grand ^Slanitoulin Island 

Brock's Monument 

Normal and Model School, Ottawa 

Osgoode Hall, Toronto . 

Lock on Rosseau River, Muskoka 

Lock at Young's Point, Peterborough 

Lock between Balsam and Cameron Lakes 

Lock between Mary's aiul Fairy Lakes 

Cut between Lakes Joseph and Rosseau 

Scugog River Works 

Pigeon River Works 

Sydenham River Works 

Nottawasaga do 

Kaministaquia do 

Muskoka 

Otonabee 

Balsam 

Gull and Burnt 

Wye 

Trent River Bridge 

Bridges at Port Carling 

Bridge at Port Sandfield 

Muskoss Falls Works 

Muskoka Lakes Works 

Washago and Gravenhurst Road 

^^'^larf at Washago 

Portage du Fort Bridge 

Clearings and Log-houses on Free Grant Lands, 'Settlers' 

Homestead Fund 

Roads in Ryerson 

Surveys, Inspections, Arbitrations, and Awards, &c 

Aldborough Drainage Works 

Brooke do 

Delaware do 

Dunwich do 



Expenditvire 

from 1st July, 

1867, to 31st 

Dec, 1878. 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



$ cts. 



136,33.5 

80,725 

229,918 

584,980 

272,845 

39,409 

120,364 

172,893 

169,279 

485,212 

8,166 

37,081 

6,192 

5,750 

1,886 

51,646 

169,665 

59,100 

37,oo4 

53,927 

5,120 

18,652 

2,987 

2,268 

2,.547 

4,119 

981 

95,958 

43,697 

36,946 

30,81t2 

2^,959 

31,401 

9,995 

53,587 

4,999 

2,156 

5,915 

22,865 

27,761 

2,520 

4,080 

38,920 

5,176 

2,000 

3,046 

2,338 

.5,013 

1,470 

32,792 

489 

4,997 



Expenditure, 
1879. 



16,780 75 i 
7,295 06 

15,625 05 
7,199 02 

34,747 73 
.5,740 93 

10,105 86 



$ cts. 

4,951 99 
107 88 

3,444 93 

8,878 84 
30,129 73 

1,245 55 
16,816 19 

4,703 41 

6,628 34 
35,091 13 
37,971 57 

7,632 13 
163 76 



5,631 89 



1,042 29 
175 26 

128 98 



2,402 79 



10,865 78 
400 03 



1,160 41 



6,098 41 



5,777 16 



6,448 03 



Total. 



$ ct». 

141,287 85 

80,833 87 

233,363 33 

593,859 21 

302,975 17 

40,654 87 

137,180 91 

177,596 58 

175,907 91 

520,303 92 

46,137 84 

44,714 05 

6,356 62 

5,750 40 

1,886 21 

51,646 34 

175,297 01 

59,100 26 

37,354 13 

54,969 39 

5,296 04 

18,781 73 

2,987 50 

2,268 79 

2,547 20 

6,521 79 

981 10 

106,823 91 

44,097 21 

36,946 03 

30,892 72 

23,959 02 

32,561 79 

9,995 75 

53,587 47 

4,999 62 

2,156 26 

5,915 09 

22,865 02 

33,860 12 

2,520 55 

4,080 95 

44,697 83 

5,176 98 

2,000 00 

3,r46 99 

2,338 43 

5,013 00 

1,470 36 

32,792 12 

489 22 

4,997 99 

16,780 75 
7,295 06 

22,073 08 
7,199 02 

34,747 73 
5,740 93 

10,105 86 



22 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 7.) 



A. 1880 



No. 2. — Statement of the Expenditure on Public Works in 1879, and Total 
Expenditure thereon up to 31st Dec, 1879. — Capital Account. — Contiiiued. 



NAME OF WORK. 



Ekfrid, Caradoc, and Metcalfe Drainage Works 

Grey Drainage Works 

Moore do 

Mosa do 

Nissouri, West, Drainage Works 

Raleigh do 

Russell do 

Sarnia do 

Sombra do 

Tilbury, East, do 

Tilbury, West, do 

Williams, East, do 

Surveys and Drainage of Swamp Lands, Provincial Account 

Totals 



Expenditure 

from 1st July, 

1867, to 31st 

Dec, 1878. 



$ cts. 

13,667 66 

8,175 47 

17,091 58 

12,714 75 

8,178 50 

36,409 64 

11,543 77 

40,540 55 

53,169 04 

35,297 62 

31,577 06 

2,221 75 

36,448 51 



Expenditure, 
1879. 



$ cts. 



§3,656,926 30 



$197,896 48 



Total. 



$ cts. 

13,667 66 

8,175 47 

17,091 58 

12,714 75 

8,178 50 

36,409 64 

11,543 77 

40,540 55 

53,169 04 

35,297 62 

31,577 06 

2,221 75 

36,448 51 



,854,822 78 



F. T. JONES, 

Accountant. 



Department of Public Works, 

Toronto, 1st January, 1880. 



23 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 7.) 



A. 1880 



No. 3. — CoNTKACTS and Bonds entered 



Date. 




Subject of Contract. 



Feb. 4.. 

" 4.. 

" 13 . 
April 16 

" 16 

" 16 
June 16 

" 25 

" 30 

" 30 

July 4.. 

" 7.. 

" 15.. 



Muskoka River Works 

London Asylum 

Mary's and Fairy Lakes Works 

Young's Lock 

Blind Institute 

Hamilton Asylum 

Central Prison 

Andrew Mercer Reformatory 

London Asylum 

Lock-up at Gore Bay, Manitoulin Island, 

Model School, Ottawa 

School of Agriculture 



6,500 to 8,500 feet of timber 

About 95,000 feet of timber 

Release of claims for damages 

9,157 feet of white pine and 512 feet of white 
oak. 

Oak and pine for repairs 

Heating apparatus. Principal's residence 

Construction and repair of sewer 

Additional storey and repair of injuries done 
by fire. 

Steam-heating apparatus 

Fences round airing-yards 

Whole work .... , 

Addition 



Department of Public Works, 

Toronto, 1st January, 1880. 



24 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 7.) 



A. 1880 



into with Her Majesty during 1878. 



CONTRACTOES. 


Sureties. 


Amount. 


George W. Taylor, Gravenhurst, Mus- 
koka District. ^ 

.Jonathan Tasker, of the Village of 




$ cts. 
Per cubic foot OSJ 

Per M. board measure 7 90 

1 000 00 


Reay, Muskoka District. 
Thomas Hiscox, London 




George Hunt, Huntsville, Muskoka 
District. 

George J. Chalmers, Young's Point, 




Per M. , white pine 10 00 
" white oak 15 00 

" white pine 1.5 00 
white oak 2.'5 00 

545 00 




Peterboro'. 
S. Saunders, London 




The Corporation of the City of Hamil- 






John Bell, Belleville, and A. S. 
Brown, Belleville. 

James Morrison, Toronto, John In- 
glis, Toronto, and Daniel Hunter, 
Toronto. 

J. McMechan, London, and John 
Walker, London. 

James Cleland, Meaford, C. Barber, 
Meaford, and T. Harris, Meaford. 

Francis McDougall, Ottawa, and 
George O'Keefe, Ottawa. 

James Barclay, Guelph, and George 
Wilkinson, Guelph. 


... .... 10 000 00 


ton. 
.John Forin, Belleville 

W. J. McGuire, Toronto, and James 
Morrison, Toronto. 

Nathan Broadbent, London 

The Law Building and Manufacturing 
Comx^any, Meaford. 

Patrick Lyons. Ottawa, and A. Robil- 
lard, Ottawa. 

Thomas Dobbie, Guelph, and Walter 


9,739 00 

7,833 00 

... 2,200 00 

1,4.50 00 

• . . ■ 24,000 00 

2 959 00 


Grierson, Guelph. 





F. T. JONES, 

Law Clerk. 



25 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



TWELFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



INSPECTOR OF ASYLUMS, PRISONS 



AND 



PUBLIC CHARITIES 



FOR THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO, 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 30th SEPTEMBER, 

1879. 



ifitttcrt Iru m\n of iUt '§t({\$Unm ^$$cmbUf. 




^ f « 1 : 

PRINTED BY C. BLAOKETT ROBINSON, 5 JORDAN STREET. 

1880. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



Office of the 
Inspector of Prisons and Public Charities, Ontario, 

Parliament Buildings, Toronto, 30tK December, 1879. 

Sir, — I have the honour to transmit herewith, to be presented to His Excellency, the 
Lieutenant-Governor, my Twelfth Annual Report upon the Asylums, Prisons and Public 
Charities of Ontario, being for the official year ending on the 30th September, 1879. 

I have the honour to be, 

Sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 

J. W. Langmuib, 

Inspector 
The Honourable, 

Arthur Sturgis Hardy, M.P.P., 

Secretary for the Province of Ontario, 

Toronto. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



CONTENTS. 



PAOE. 

PREFACE 1-5 

PART I. — Asylums for the Insane ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 6-69 

PART II. — Prisons, Common Gaols and Reformatories 70-194 

PART III. — Institutions for the Education of the Deaf and Dumb, and__^the 

Blind 195-211 

PART IV. — Hospitals and Charitable Institutions 212-298 

APPENDIX 294-452 



Pbeface 1-5 

Working and progress of Public Institutions — Synopsis of only given ... ... 1 

Asylums for the Insane — General remarks upon ... ... ... ... ... 1-2 

Refractory Branch of the London Asylum, completed and occupied ... ... 2 

Hamilton Asylum — Two new wiags completed and occupied ... ... ... 2 

Total Asylum accommodation ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 

Number of vacancies at close of year ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 

Vacancies confined to the Westei-n Asylums only ... ... ... ... ... 2 

Insane in the Eastern section of the Province thereby put to inconvenience ... 2 

Kingston Asylum should be enlarged ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 

Idiots — temporary provision for — made in the Hamilton Asylum ... ... ... 2 

Orillia Asylum — Buildings should be added to ... ... ... ... ... 2 

Number of persons admitted to Asylums, and total in residence during the year ... 2 

Prisons and Reformatories — General remarks upon ... ... ... ... ... 2 

Number of Institutions comprised under such heading ... ... ... ... 2 

Prison and Reformatory system of the Province complete ... ... ... ... 2 

Reformatory for Women and Industrial School for Girls, well advanced in con- 
struction ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 3 

Reformatory for Boys — Changes in management of, being carried out ... ... 8 

Central Prison still ranks as a most useful establishment ... ... ... ... 8 

Falling off in number of commitments to Common Gaols ... ... ... ... 3 

Institutions for the Deaf and Dumb, and the Blind — General remarks upon ... 3 

Institutions continue to work well ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 3 

Institntion for the Blind — Another wing should be added to the ... ... ... 8 

Hospitals and Charitable Institutions — Remarks upon ... ... ... ... 8 

Number of Institutions receiving grants under provisions of Charity Aid Act ... 3 

Statement shewing number of persons who br'c ime inmates of Public Institutions 4 



43 Yictcria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



Charge upou Treasury of the Province for maintaining and aiding such Institutions, 

Tables shewing the ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 4-6 

Revenue derived from Provincial Institutions ... ... ... ... ... ... 5 

Public Institutions buildings — Woodcuts and descriptions of, inserted in report ... 5 



PART I. 

Asylums tor the Insane ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 6-69 

Number of Insane and Idiotic persons under accommodation on the .'JOth September, 

1879, and 30th September, 1878 6 

Increase in Insane population — Chiefly in London and Hamituu Asylums ... 6-7 

Toronta Asylum — Slight decrease in population of, explained ... ... ... 7 

Kingston Asylum — Beds aU filled ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 7 

Orillia Asylum — Accommodation exhausted ... ... ... ... ... ... ^ 

Insane in Dominion Penitentiary — Increase of one in number of ... ... ... 7 

Decrease in number of Lunatics in Common Gaols at the close of the year ... 7 

Increase in population of Asylums — Cause of, explained ... ... ... ... 7-8 

Lunatics in private houses at close of year, fewer than at any previous time ... 8 

Conclusions arrived at regarding increase of insane population ... ... ... 9 

Movements of Asylum populations — Table shewing the ... ... ... ... 9 

Length of Asylum residence of patients remaining in confinement at close of year 9 
Asylum Accommodation — -Table shewing extent of — aleo number of beds vacant at 

close of year ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 10 

Admissions — Remarks upon ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 10 

Re-admissions — Number of ... ... ... ... ..i ... ... ... 11 

Commitment of Lunatics to Gaol — Practice frequently resorted to ... ... ... 11 

Necessity for such practice really very rare ... ... ... ... ... ... 11 

Counties from which admissions were made ... ... ... ... ... ... 11 

Table shewing number of persons admitted to Asylums each year since Confedera- 
tion, the number under treatment in such years, and the number in residence 

at the close of each year ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 12 

Nationalities, religious denominations, and social state of persons admitted during 

the official year, and in all previous years ... ... ... ... ... .. 12 

Discharges — Summary of, shewing the mental condition of the patients at the time 

ofrelease ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 13 

Percentage of recoveries on the admissions to, and total populations of Asylums ... 13 

Incurable patients — Number of, remaining in Asylums ... ... ... ... 13 

Length of Asylum residence of patients discharged cui-ed ... ... ... ... 13 

Length of Asylum residence of those discharged in an improved condition ... ... 14 

Probational discharges — Remarks upon ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 14 

Deaths — Summary of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 14 

Rate of mortality, the lowest for several years ... ... ... ... ... ... 15 

Rate varied in the uifferent Asylums ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 15 

Causes of death ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 15 

Length of residence of patients who died ... ... ... ... ... ... 15 

Suicide — Only one case of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 15 

vi. 



43 Yictoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



PAGB. 

Escapes — Thirty-seven in number 15 

Asylum for tlie Insane, Toronto — Summary of operations during year 15 

Asylum for the Insane, London— Summary of operations during year 16 

Asylum for the Insane, Kingston — Summary of operations during year 17 

Asylum for the Insane, Hamilton— Summary of operations during year 17-18 

Asylum for Idiots, Orillia — Summary of operations during year 18 

Causes of insanity — Summary of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 18-19 

Employment of patients ... 19 

Greater organization and method required in carrying on Asylum employment ... 19 

Number of patients in Asylums unfit for out-door labour 20 

Light employment should be provided for such ... ... ... ... ... 20 

Farming and gardening most suited to the majority of patients 20 

Ai-ea of land attached to the Asylums ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 20 

Cartailment of Toronto Asylum property ... ... ... ... ... ... 20 

Kingston Asylum — More land required for 21 

Hamilton and Orillia Asylums — Area of land attached to, should be increased ... 21 

Acquirement of additional land for Asylum purposes strongly recommended ... 21 

Statement of value of products from Asylum farms and gardens 21 

Amusements and recreation of patients — Eemarks upon ... ... ... ... 21-22 

Out-door Sports should be encouraged 22 

Patients sent to bed too early ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 22 

Officers, attendants and servants — Number of ... ... ... ... ... ,,, 22 

Changes in Asylum staff during official year ... 22-23 

Asylum Expenditure — Summary of 23 

Annual cost per patient in 1873 and 1879 23 

Summary of the annual and weekly cost per patient in each Asylum in 1879 ... 23 

Summary of the annual and weekly cost per patient in each Asylum in 1878 ... 24 

Remarks upon various items of expenditure ... ... ... ... ... ... 24-25 

Paying patients — Number of and amount received from 25 

Decrease in receipts for maintainance ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 25 

Summary of weekly rates paid ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 25 

Summary of receipts during each year since Confedei-ation ... ... ... ... 25 

Supplies — Summary shewing method of purchase, etc. ... ... ... ... 26 

Skparatk Reports upon Asylums for the Insane ... ... ... ... ... 26-49 

Asylum for thk Issanr, Toronto — Woodcut of, and description of buildings ... 26-28 

First inspection made on 17th and 18th March ... ... ... ... ... ... 28 

Population of Asylum — Movements of, sines 39th September, 1878 28 

Remarks upon admissions and discharges ... ... ... ... ... ... 28 

Condition of patients satisfactory ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 28 

Mechanical restraint — No cases of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 28 

State of Asylum very satisfactory ... ... ... ... ... ..'. ... 28 

Painting of single rooms to be continued ... ... ... ... ... ... 28 

Dining-room arrangements in superior wards much improved ... ... ... 28 

Bread— Quality of 28 

Kitchen arrangements of east main building, east wing and east hospital — Consoli- 
dation of, considered ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 28 

vii. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



System of steam cooking adopted ... 

Heating arrangement^, defects in, require to be overcome 

Aii-ing verandahs — Re-construction of 

City water — Supply of, to the Asylum 

Second inspection made on 25tli June 

Asylum population and changes therein since previous visit ... 

Number of patients in excess of space limitations 

Admission to be confined to paying patients 

AppUcations for admissions of free patients to be referred to the London and Hamil- 
ton Asylxuns 

Good health of patients and efficient hygienic arragements proved by the small 
number of deaths 

Condition and appearance of the patients 

Food served at meals found to be good, except the bread 

Baker to resign 

Additional furnitiu'e for some of the halls ordered 

Laundry working well 

Farm, garden, and ornamental grounds in admirable order ... 

Old Exhibition grounds acquired from the Corporation 

Pig-pens to be removed to the newly acquired grounds 

Third inspection made on 13th and 14th October 

Movements of patients 

Ee-admissions to be so entered in the register ... 

Death rate unprecedentedly low 

Suicide committed by a patient 

Extra precautions ordered to be taken in the future ... 

Patients seen and conversed with ... 

Mechanical restraint almost enth'dly absent 

Dress of male patients fairly satisfactory 

New tailor to be appointed 

Female patients neatly and tidily dressed 

Female attendants in uniform 

Dinners seen and tasted 

Asylum throughout in excellent condition 

Airing verandahs re-constructed ... 

Exercise in verandahs not to be taken as a substitute for out-door recreation 

Bathing arrangements not satisfactory ... 

One bath-room to be re-constructed and account kept of cost of work 

Dilapidated bedsteads and straw ticks still in use 

Appropriation to be asked for new bedsteads, hair mattresses, etc. ... 

Accommodation in the wings should bs devoted exclusively for paying patients ... 

NfcW kitchen arrangements completed 

Appropriations to be asked for erection of coal-sheds and amusement haU and 
chapel, and for the carrying out of other works 



PAGE. 

28 
29 
29 
29 
29 
29 
29 
29 

29 

29 
29 
29 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 

32 



Asylum for the Insane, London — Woodcut and description of buildings 
Fu-st inspection made on 1st and 2ud January ... 

viii. 



32-33 
33 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



PAGE. 

Movements and changes of population ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 34 

Patient — Death of, hastened by scalding ... ... ... ... ... ... 34 

Discharge of attendant in fault ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 34 

Eestraint book examined ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 34 

Cases of restraint equal to 1^ per cent, of daily population ... ... ... ... 34 

Patients — Bodily condition of, and appeai*ance generally satisfactory ... ... 34 

Health of Asylum exceptionally good ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 34 

Main Asylum and Cottages — Corridors and sleeping apartments of, in perfect order 34 

Addition to laundry and new dying room in use ... ... ... ... ... 34 

Steam in new addition very dense, porch to be erected at x-ear entrance to the 

same ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 34 

Water tank in gan-et apparently in dangerous condition ... ... ... ... 34 

Public Works Department requested to examine its supports and bearings ... 34 

Eefractory wards — Fiu'nishing of to be gone on with ... ... ... ... ... 34 

Shelving in store-rooms to be put up ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 34 

Wu'e coverings for steam-pipes required ... ... ... ... ... ...' ... 34 

Old refractory wards in main building to be cleaned and painted ... ... ... 34 

Work performed by Asylum carpenters, account of to be kept ... ... ... 35 

Farmer to be transferred to the Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, and Institution 

farmer sent to the Asylum ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 35 

Water-tank in main building found to be secure... ... ... ... ... ... 35 

Second inspection made on the 25th and 26th March ... ... ... ... ... 35 

Number of patients in residence, etc. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 35 

Death of patient by falling through trap-door ... ... ... ... ... ... 35 

Doors of trap to be altered ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 35 

Asylum in excellent order 35 

Ventilation of wards — Some effective means should be de\ased for the ... ... 35 

Two wards in refractory branch in occupation ... ... ... ... ... ... 35 

Interior arrangements of the building generally well suited for the patients ... 35 

Two more wards to be fitted up, and forty patients transferred from main building 35 

Changes in interior economy of Asylum ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 35 

East and west cottages jointly tenanted by male and female patients.. ... ... 35 

Two large associated dining-rooms separately occupied by the sexes... ... ... 36 

Changes reported favourably of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 36 

Pay-list examined and duties of staff enquired into ... ... ... ... ... 36 

Allowance of bread, milk, etc., to occupants of gate-houses to be stopped ... ... 36 

Greater efforts to be made to get the relatives of patients to supply clothing. ... 36 

Water-closets on male side of building to be altered ... ... ... ... ... 36 

Bursar authorized to make sundry purchases ... ... ... ... ... ... 36 

Rear premises to be laid out and ornn.mented ... ... ... ... ... ... 36 

Third inspection made on 9th and 10th July ... ... ... ... ... ... 36 

The institution and its affairs in good working order ... 86 

Operations of Asylum since previous inspection... ... ... ... ... ... 36 

Condition of patients... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 36 

Lunatics in the Toronto and Kingston Asylum districts to be admitted to the London 

Asylum ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 36 

Leaky condition of roofs of main building ... ... ... ... ... ... 36 

ix. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



PAGE. 

Hardwood to be laid in various places ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 37 

"Watsr-closets — A.lteration of nearly completed 37 

Tantilation of laundry improved ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 37 

Steam-lieating — Scheme for combining all boilers in one central house ... ... 37 

"Water supply and fire-extinguishing appliances ... ... ... ... ... ... 37 

Asylum land in admirable condition ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 37 

Farmer transfen-ed from Belle\dlle on trial to be appointed ... ... ... ... 37 

Garden in good order... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 37 

Lower portion of enclosure to be levelled... ... ... ... ... ... ... 37 

Brick sewer should first be continued to garden fence, and some tile-drainage done. 37 

Estimate of cost of work to be submitted 37 

Ornamentation of rear premises commenced ... ... ... ... ... ... 37 

Purchase of material authorized ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 37 

Fencing of grounds of refractory ward — Estimate cost of, to be submitted... ... 37 

Coal dehvered — Good quality of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 37 

Application of mechanics to have dinner in Asylum refused ... ... ... ... 37 

Cost of maintaining patients in each branch of Asylum — Books to be so kept as to 

give this separately ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 37 

Changes in medical staff of Asylum ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 37-38 

Necessary alterations in pay-list authorized ... ... ... ... ... ... 38 

Paying patients — List of, exammed ... ... ... ... ... ... 38 

Asylum for the Insane, Kingston, wood-cut and description of buildings 38-39 

First inspection made on 19th February ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 39 

Movements of patients ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 39 

Appearance and condition of patients' health wonderfully good ... ... ... 39 

Frequent and continued restraint and seclusion are things of the past ... ... 39 

State of Asylum worthy of great praise ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 39 

{Sundry improvements to be gone on with.. ... ... ... ... ... ... 39 

Cribbing of water-front of Asylum... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 39 

Iron table for kitchen.. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 39 

Cmied hah- — Purchase of, authorized ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 39 

Furniture for ward No. 9 — Requisition for, approved ... ... ... ... ... 39 

Dinner well prepared and served ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 39 

Housemaid for officers' quarters — engagement of — authorized ... ... ... 40 

Assistant engineer and stoker to remain in Asylum at night ... ... ... 40 

Mason or plasterer to be engaged temporarily ... ... ... ... ... ... 40 

Lane between Asylum property and Cartwright Estate, records in respect of, to Jae 

examined ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 40 

House accommodatiou, extent of, to be reported upon when Cartwright and Jack- 
son properties are taken over ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 40 

Second inspection made on 11th April ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 40 

Population of Asylum ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 40 

Two females only under restraint 40 

Glass — smashing of, a frequent occurrence, wire shutters to be placed over windows 

in two bedrooms in each ward on female side ... ... ... ... ... 40 

Halls, etc. , in excellent order ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 40 

X. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



PAGB. 

Works authoriz'^cl, found to be either finished or in progress 40 

Ward No. 9 greatly improved ... ... ... ... ••. ••• ••• ••• ^^ 

New Avenue to Asyhim ... ... ... ... ... ... ••. ••• ••• "^^ 

Cow sheds on Watt property to be taken down ••• 40 

Allocation of houses to remain in abeyance ... ... ... ... ••• ••• ^^ 

Third inspection made on 28th September ... S». 40 

Movements of patients ... ... ... ... ••• ••• ••• ••• ••• 40 

Lunatics on reception into Asylum to be examined in presence of relatives or 

sheriff's ofl&cer ... ... ... ... ... ••• ••• ••• ••• ••• 41 

JRegister checked and every patient seen ... ... ... ... ••• ••• 41 

No restraint on male side, two cases on the female side ... ... ... ••• 41 

Dress of patients satisfactory ... ... ... ... ... ... ••• ••• 41 

Condition of wards, etc — favourable report made of ... ... ... ... ••• 41 

Additional furniture required to render wards more comfortable ... ... ... 41 

Straw beds, use of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ••• ••• 41 

New bedsteads to be fitted with hair mattresses 41 

Water-closets to be reconstructed ... ... ... ... ... ... ••. ••• 41 

Condition of grounds ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ••• 41 

Ordnance land adjoining the Asylum should be acquired ... ... ... ... 41 

New stores, laundry and carpenter's shop in use ... ... ... ... ... 41 

Horse and six cows to be bought ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ••• 41 

Additional books of record to be obtained ... ... ... ... ... ... 41 

Dr. Metcalf appointed superintendent, vice Dr. Dickson, resigned ... ... ... 42 

" Forty-foot Road," closing of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 42 

Works of improvement and construction, for which appropriations are required ... 42 

Asylum fob the Insane, Hamilton — Wood cut and description of buildings ... 42-43 

First inspection made on 27th Dec, 1878 43 

Changes in Asylum population ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 43 

Condition of patients and Asylum ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 43 

New dining hall in use ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 43 

Meal arrangements ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 44 

Amusement hall occupied ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 44 

Ee-allocation of additional rooms ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 44 

Rent of house for carpenter not to be allowed ... ... ... ... ... ... 44 

Second inspection made on 10th and 11th February ... ... ... ... ... 44 

New wings — furnishing of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 44 

Lower corridors leading to new wings to be cleaned and painted ... ... ... 44 

Population of Asylum ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 44 

Assistant physician or matron to be present at aU meals served in the associated 

dining room ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 44 

Third inspection made on the 1st April ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 44 

Furniture for new words examined ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 44 

Requisition for additional furnishings to be submitted ... ... ... ... 44 

Old bedsteads — width of, to be reduced, and mattresses remale 

Wire guards for windows in refractory ward ... ... ... ... ... ... 45 

Panes of glass, size of, to be reduced ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 45 

Live stock — purchase of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 45 

xi. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (ISlo. 8.) 



A. 1880 



PAGE. 

Population of Asylum ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 45 

Asylum in creditable condition ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 45 

Water-closets and baths in main bailling can be dispensed with ... ... ... 45 

Heating of Asylum — circulation of steam defective 45 

Fourth inspection made on 28th May ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 45 

Asylum accommodation — fiftfrnore beds to be made up 45 

Additional furnishings to be obtained ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 46 

Maintenance of patients — instructions given regarding the ... ... ... ... 46 

Idiots, accommodation for, tj be set apart in the Hamilton Asylum temporarily ... 46 

AsYLUii FOR Idiots, Orillia — Woodcut and description of buildings 47 

Inspection made on 18th and I9th March ... 47 

Nurses' dormitory used as day room for female inmates ... ... ... ... 47 

Better classification thus obtained ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 47 

Room for six more inmates ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 47 

Inmates evidently kindly treated and well looked after • 47 

Muffs to be ordered ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 47 

Health of Asylum very good ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 47 

Food good and sufficient ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 48 

Asylum in all departments in a well-kept state ... ... ... ... ... ... 48 

ni-feeliog between ofl&cers of Asylum — Cause of, investigated ... 48 

Second inspection made on 17th June ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 48 

Changes in population ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 48 

Airing yard for females improved ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 48 

Drains to be flushed and aired ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 48 

Verandahs require re-construction ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 48 

New road to Asylum to be laid out ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 48 

New matron appointed ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 48 

Temporary accommodation for idiots to be made in the Hamilton Asylum ... 48 

Third inspection made on 23rd August ... ... ... ... ... ... ••• 49 

Register checked and every inmate seen ... ... ... ... ... ••• 49 

Ceilings require repairing ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 49 

Grounds — Improvement of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 49 



Tables of Asylum Operations and Statistics 
List of tables ... 
Table No. I, shewing the general movements of patients in respect to admissions 

discharges deaths, and transfers, together with the number in residence atMhe 

beginning and ending of the year, etc. 
Table No. 2, shewing the counties from which patients were admitted to Asylums 

during the year, and the Asylums they were assigned to ... 
Table No. 3, shewing the counties and places from which the entire number of 

patients that have been admitted to Asylums were received 
Table No. 4, shewing the length of time the patients, received into the Asylums 

during the year, had been insane prior to the time of admission 
Table No. 5, shewing length of residence of patients remaining in the Asylums on 

the 30th September, 1879 

xii. 



51-69 
49-50 



51 



52 



53 



54 



55 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



FAGE. 

Table No. 6, shewing the periods that patients were under treatment who were dis- 
charged cured during the year ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 56 

Table No. 7, shewing the period that patients were under treatment who were dis- 
charged improved during the year ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 57 

Table No. 8, shewing the periods that patients were under treatment who were dis- 
charged unimproved during the year ... ... ... ... ... ... 58 

Table No. 9, shewing the length of Asylum residence of those patients who died 

during the year ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 59 

Table No. 10, shewing the causes cf death of those patients who died during the 

year ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 60 

Table No. 11, shewing the trades, calUngs, and occupations of the persons admitted 
to the various iisylunis during the year ending 30th September, 1879, and the 
total admissions ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 61-62 

Table No. 12, shewing the causes of insanity of the persons admitted to the various 

Asylums during the year ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 63-64 

Table No. 13, shewing detailed expenditure of the various Asyhims of the Pi'ovince 

for the year ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 65 

Table No. 14, statement shewing in detail the amount expended for the variozs 
branches of the Asylum service, and the cost per patient for maintenance for 
the year ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 66 

Table No. 15, shewing the supplies for which tenders were invited and tlie prices 

paid for the same under contract ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 67 

Table No. 16, shewing the number of officers and emidoyes in each and all of the 

Asylums, classified according to duties performed ... ... ... ... 68 

Tabl3 No. 17, shewing the natui'e of employment and the number of days work per- 
formed by patients during the year ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 69 



PAET II. 



Prisons, Common Gaols, and Reformatories 70-194 

Common Gaols 70-146 

Commitments during year — Number of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 70 

Commitments during past three years— Comparative summary of ... .. ... 70 

Decrease in commitments of ofl&cial year ... ... ... ... ... ... 70 

Gaols in which largest decreases have taken place ... ... ... ... ... 70 

City gaols — Commitments to, still decreasing ... ... ... ... ... ... 71 

Female population of gaols ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 71 

Committals to gaols since 1869 — Summary of 71 

Youths committed to gaol, number of, reduced ... 71 

Summary of number of boys and girls committed since 1869 71-72 

Re-commitment of prisoners, remarks upon ... ... ... ... ... ... 72 

Crimes and offences for which persons were committed, summary of, for the years 

1869, 1875, 1876, 1877, 1873, 1879, and remarks thereupon 72-73 

Disposition of persons committed, summary of 74 

Nature of sentences passed upon the convicted persons, summar-y shewing ... 74 

xiii. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



Crimes and offences for which persons were sentenced, summary of, and remarks 

upon 75-76 

Difference between number of persons committed for drunkenness and vagrancy, 

and the number sentenced, cause of, explained ... ... 78 

Lock-ups for such class of prisoners, should be erected by municipalities ... 76 

County Judge's Criminal Courts, operations of 76 

Period of sentences passed upon convicted prisoners, summary of 7G- 77 

Number of persons in custody at close of the year, and their places of confinement. 77 
Nationalities, religious denominations, social condition, habits and educational status 

of prisoners committed during the year 77-78 

Escapes, number of ... ... 78 

Goderich gaol, particulars of escapes from ... ... ... ... ... ... 78-79 

Berlin gaol, particulars of escapes from ... ... ... 79-80 

Napanee gaol, particulars of escapes from 80 

Ottawa gaol, particulars of escape from ... 80 

Stratford gaol, particulars of escape from ... ... ... ... ... ... 80 

Woodstock gaol, particulars of escapes from ... 80-82 

Parry Sound lock-up, escape from ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 82 

Toronto gaol, particulars of escapes from ... ... ... ... ... ... 82 

St. Thomas gaol, particulars of escapes from ... ... ... ... ... ... 82-83 

Simeoe gaol, particulars of escapes from ... ... ... ... ... ... 83 

Deaths, number of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 84 

Gaol buildings, construction of, and alterations to, etc. ... ... ... ... 84 

Woodstock gaol, alterations to ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 84 

Kingston gaol, hot water heating appliances introduced into ... ... ... ... 84 

Owen Sound gaol. Council decided to heat it with hot air ... ... .... ... 84 

Lock-ups at Bracebridge, Pari-y Soimd, Manitowaning, and Little Current, furnished 

and occupied ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 84 

Brantfoid gaol, entrance to, should be altered ... ... ... ... ... ... 84 

Goderich gaol, requires enlarging ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 84 

St. Thomas gaol, kitchen, etc., should be added to ... ... ... ... ... 84 

Orangeville, plans for new gaol at, to be submitted ... ... ... ... ... 84 

Maintaining gaols during past year, summary of cost of ... ... ... ... 84 

Cost of maintaiaing gaols since Confederation, table shewing ... ... ... 85 

Aggregate days' custody of prisoners since Confederation, summary of the ... 85 

Remarks thereupon ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 86 

Municipal and criminal prisoners, period of custody of ... ... ... ... 86 

Maintaining prisoners, daily cost of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 86 



Sepakate Eeports upon CoMMO>f Gaols 
Barrie Gaol ... 

Belleville Gaol 

Berlin " 

Brampton " 

Brantf>rd " 

Brockville " 

Cayuga " 



87-120 
87-88 

88 
88-90 

90 
90-91 
91-92 
92-93 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No, 8.) 



A. 1880 



Chatham Gaol 
Cohourg " 
Cornwall '* 
Goderich " 
Guelph *' 
Hamilton " 
Kingston " 
L'Orignal " 
Lindsay " 
Loudon " 
Milton 
Napanee " 
Ottawa '* 
Owen Sound" 
Pembroke " 
Perth 

Peterborougli Gaol .. 
Picton " 

Prince Arthur's Landi 
St. Catharines Gaol .. 
St. Thomas " .. 

Sandwich '* .. 

Sarnia " .. 

Sault Ste. Marie " .. 
Simcoe " .. 

Stratford " .. 

Toronto ** .. 

Walkerton " .. 

Welland " .. 

Whitby " .. 

"Woodstock 

Bracebridge Lock-up 
Manitowauing " .. 
Little Current '' .. 



Gaol 



PAGE. 

... 93-94 
... 94-95 
96 
... 95-97 
... 97-98 
... 98-99 
99 
... 99-100 
...100-101 

101 
...101-102 
...102-103 
...103-104 
...104-105 
...105-106 

106 
...100-107 
...107-108 

108 
...108-109 
...109-110 
...110-111 
...111-112 

112 
...112-113 

113 
...113-115 

116 
...116-117 
...117-118 
...118-119 

119 

119 

120 



Gaol Statistics, Tables of 120-146 

List of tables 120 

Table No. 1, shewing the number of prisoners, male and female, committed during 
the year ending 30th September, 1879, and a comparison of the same with the 
preceding year ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 121 

Table No. 2, shewing the number of prisoners over and under 16 years of age, the 
number of recommittsils, the number of persons acquitted on being brought to 
trial, and the number of prisoners committed under civil processes ... ... 122-123 

Table No. 3, shewing the offences for which prisoners were committed ... ...124-127 

Table No. 4, shewing the total number of prisoners, male and fjmale, committed 

under each offence during the year ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 128-129 

Table No. 5, shewing the number of prisoners upon whom sentence was parsed, the 
nature and period of the sentences, and the operation of the of the County 

Judges' Criminal Courts 130-131 

XV. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



PAGE. 

Table No. G, sliewiu^? the offeuces for which prisoners were sentenced. ... ... 132-135 

Table No. 7, shewing the total number of prisoners, male and female, sentenced 

under each oflfence ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 136 

Table No. 8, shewing the nationalities, rehgious denominations, social state, etc., of 

the prisoners committed ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 137 

Table No. No. 9, shewing the occupation, trade and calliug of the prisoners com- 
mitted during the year 138-141 

Table No. 10, shewing the number of escapes and deaths, the revenue derived from 
prison labour, the cost of diet, the accommodation of the gaols, and the highest 
and lowest number of prisoners in custody in each gaol during the year. ... 142-143 

Table No. 11, shewing how the prisoners committed during the j-ear were main- 
tained, and the cost thereof ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...144-145 

Table No 12, shewing the total number of prisoners in the several gaols of the 
Province on the evening of the 30th September, 1879, and the nature of their 
imprisonment ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 146 



Central Prison of Ontario, movements of population ... ... ... ... ... 147 

Remarks thereupon ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 147 

Deaths, causes of, etc.. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 147 

Removal of four prisoners as lunatics to Asylum ... ... ... ... ... 148 

Prisoners unfitted for hard labom* still sentenced direct... ... ... ... ... 148 

Escapes, number of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 148 

Sentences passed upon prisoners, summary shewing periods of ... ... 148 

Nationalities, religious denominations, civil condition, social habits and educational 

status of prisioners ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 149 

Sentences, average period of, very short ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 149 

Fke, occurrence of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 149 

Loss and iusm-ance on buildings, machinery, etc. ... ... ... ... ... 150 

Foundry' building reconstructed and used as broom -shop ... ... ... ... 150 

Outbreak of fire, likelihood of, reduced ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 150 

Prisoners, industrial employment of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... l.'SO 

Statement shewing number of days worked in each branch ... ... ... ...150-151 

Woodenware, manufacture of uuremunerative ... ... ... ... ... ... 151 

Plant, machinery and goods disposed of, and industry stopped ... ... ... 151 

Brush making also abandoned ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 151 

Many prisoners stiU without regular employment ... ... ... ... ... 151 

Industrial work should be procured for one hundred prisoners ... ... ... 151 

North and south shops available for iron and wood working ... ... ... ... 151 

Offers for the leasing of these shops, with the labour of prisoners to be advertized 

for 51 

Industrial department, changes in the management of ... ... ... ... 151 

Inspection — many visits of, made " ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 152 

Sptcial inspection made on 5th, 6th and 7th July ... ... ... ... ... 152 

Entire premises gone over, and disciphne, routine, etc., of prison minutely ex- 
amined into ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 152 

Condition of establishment, and manner in which it is maintained, most favourable 

reports to be made of 152 

Satisfactory condition of prison and prisoners reflects credit on pris n staff ... 152 

xvi. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. lyso 



PAGE. 

Movements of xn-isoners since close of of&cial year, summary of ... ... ... 153 

Statement of manner in wliich prisoners were employed ... ... ... ... 153 

Industrial dtpartmeuts, working of, minutely enquired into 154 

Broom shop, reraarks upon ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 154 

Brick yard, remarks upon ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 154 

Blacksmith, macliine, and wood shops, remarks upon ... ... ... ... 154 

Tailor's shop, remarks upon ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 155 

Shoe shop, remarks i;pon ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 155 

Mat making, remarks upon ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 155 

Garden and farm work, remarks upon ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 155 

Outside gang, work of, remarks upon ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 155 

Domestic service of the prison, remarks upon ... ... ... ... ... ... 155 

Conduct register, to be kept in each shoj) ... ... ... ... ... ... 156 

Dietary arrangements and regidations examined ... ... ... ... ... 156 

Ample amount of food supplied ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 156 

Complaints made of insufficiency of food by a few prisoners ... ... ... 156 

Complainants admit the possession of inordinately large appetites ... ... 156 

Not desirable to alter dietary to meet exceptional cases ... ... ... ... 156 

Diet, scale of 156-157 

Food, quality of, examined ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 157 

Eefiigerator i-equired for keeping meat ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 157 

Roll called, and every prisoner seen and spoken to ... ... ... ... ... 157 

Complaints made regarding dietary 168 

Complaints made regarding medical treatment ... ... ... ... ... 158 

Complaints made that unfair and undue punishment had been given ... ... 158 

Complaints, all enquired into, and found to be without foundation ... ... 158 

Hospital, remarks upon ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 158 

Sunday services, routine of, examined ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 158 

Attendance at Protestant services by Eoman Catholic prisoners, and via- versa ... 159 

Practice to be discontinued 159 

Success of present method of giving religious instruction, obviates necessity of 

appointing Chaplains ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 159 

Night school, pi'oposed estabhshment of, to be considered ... ... ... ... 159 

Miuor improvements made to prison premises ... ... ... ... ... ... 159 

Tailor's shop should be enlarged ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 159 

Store-room for prisoner's personal clothing, to be fitted up in extension of tailor's 

shop 159 

Heat of kitchen, means of reducing, should be obtained ... ... ... ... 159 

Cupolas to be removed ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 159 

Minor instructions recorded ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 160 

Fire appliances, efficiency of, tested ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 160 

Maintenance expenditure, statement of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 160 

Places from which prisoners wei-e received, statement of ... ... ... ... 16 

Transfei'riug prisoners, statement of costs of ... ... ... ... ... ... 162 

Discharged prisoners, list of places returned to, and cost of fares, etc ... ...1G2-163 

Administration of criminal justice account, Central Prison, balance sheet of ... 164 

Industrial department, financial operations of ... ... ... ... ... ... 165 

Expenditures, statement of ... 165-167 

xvii. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



PAGB. 

Sales of manufactured goods and charges of prison labour, statement of ... ...167-170 

Stock of manufactured goods, semi-manufactured goods and raw material on hand, 

30th September 1879, statement of 170 

Amounts outstanding for manufactures and prison labour ... ... 170-171 

Industrial operations, general balance sheet of ... ... ... ... ... ... 172 

Description of Central Prison buildings, and wood cut thei-eof ... ... ... 17S 

Provincial Reformatory, operations of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 175 

Nationalities and reliij;ious denominations of inmates ... ... ... ... ...175-176 

Commitments, nximber of, since Confederation ... ... ... ... ... ... 176 

Ages of boys committed ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 176 

Kelly, Wm. M., resignation of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 176 

McCrosson, Thomas, appointment of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 176 

Decision arrived at by Government to carry out alterations in management of Re- 
formatory... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 176 

General instruction issued to new warden and officers... ... ... ... ... 176 

Complete re-organization of the institution involved ... ... ... ... ... 176 

Penal features to be abandoned, and the institution transformed into a Reformatoiy 

School 176 

Discipline and interior economy, necessary changes in, cannot all be introduced 

at once ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 176 

Reformatories in United States visited by the warden ... ... ... ... ... 177 

Practical knowledge of the working of the best managed institutions thus obtained 177 

Glaring defects of the old system to be eliminated by the warden ... ... ... 177 

Roles and regulations, any changes to be made by the warden to be most carefully 

considered ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 177 

Disciplinary defects cannot all be particularized in a minute ... ... ... ... 177 

Suggestions made for the remedy of a few ... ... ... ... ... ... 177 

Names and designations to be changed ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 177 

Reasons for such cliange ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .•■ ••• 177 

Prison nomenclature to be discarded ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 177 

Boys, care and treatment of, should approach that of well-regulated family ... 178 

Superintendent, duties of, in the reception and care of the boys 178 

Officers and staff of the Reformatory, manner in which they should perform their 

duty 178 

Any officer, etc., guilty of harsh conduct, to be suspended from duty 178 

Disciplinary defects, a few of the, commented upon 178 

Boys lockfd up in cells too early 178 

More play and exercise to be allowed ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 178 

Lectures, etc., to be given during winter evenings ... ... ... ... ... 178 

Table and dietary arrangements to be improved 179 

Schools in some respects inefficient 179 

"Workshops, system in, to be changed and improved 179 

Cleanliness and order to be the guiding rules of the institution 179 

Personal liberty, larger degree of, might be extended to the boys ... 179 

Honour of a boy to be depended upon to a reasonable extent... ... ... ... 179 

Cellular pystem most objectionable 179 

xviii. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 18^0 



PAGE. 

Cell structures at once removed from one dormitory I79 

Associated sleeping-rooms to be introduced if superintendent reports favourably of 

proposed change... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ..^ __^ j^yg 

Work of remedying all defects in the reformatory system requires great ability, 

zeal, energy, etc 180 

Act defining the objects of the Eeformatory, recommendation for the framing of... 180 

By-laws to be framed ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 180 

Minutes of inspection recorded ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 180 

First visit made on 8th and 9th May 180 

Movements of inmates 180 

Health and appearance of boys satisfactory 180 

Wing A, condition of 180 

" B, " 180 

Associated dormitory, condition of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 180 

Protestant chapel, condition of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 180 

Roman Catholic chapel, condition of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 180 

Protestant school-room, condition of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 180 

Roman Catholic school-room, condition o ... ... ... ... ... ... 180 

Kitchen, dining-room, etc., condition of 180 

Bursar's stores, condition of 180 

Steward's stores, condition of 180 

Capital account, unauthorized expenditures upon 180 

Dwelling houses for employh, two to be built 181 

Cooper, etc., shop, to be bricked up ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 181 

Cell-dormitory in wing A, reflooring of 181 

Fire-proof paint to be spread on roof ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 181 

Clothes-pin factory, instructions regarding 181 

Fm-niture shop, '• " " 181 

Match factory, proposed contract with Mr. Beck in regard to 182 

Cooper's shop, work of 182 

Tailor's shop, work in 182 

Shoe shop, work in 182 

Second inspection made on 18th June 182 

Broom handles, contract for making of 182 

Match-making, contract closed ... ••• 182 

Clothes-pins, manufacture of 182 

Capital account, sundry purchases on, authorized 182 

Lumber and brick, lowest tender for supply of, to be accepted 182 

Third inspection made on 21st and 22nd August 183 

Instalment of new Superintendent and Deputy Superintendent 183 

Of&cers and staff of Reformatory notified of new appointments and proposed changes 183 

Duties of officers, Superintendent to report upon 183 

Cell work of dormitory B to be removed 183 

Dormitory, manner in which to be reconstructed 183 

Plastering, offer for, to be accepted ^^^ 

Steam boiler, additional, sent up ■'■83 

Water closets for boys and employes ^°^ 

*1 xix. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (JNo. 8.) 



A. 1880 



PAGE. 

Gate house to be pulled down ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 184 

Water supply to be obtained from the Bay ... ... ... ... ... ... 184 

Workshops, instructions issued regarding ... ... ... ... ... ... 184 

Tobacco not to be given to the boys by emiiloyest under penalty of instant sus- 
pension ... 184 

Surgeon, visits of, to be more frequent ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 184 

• New wing, erection of, imperative ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 184 

Houses for reformatory staff, three more required 184 

Heating of buildings by steam, provision should be made for ... ... ... 184 

Brick shop for carpenter required ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 184 

Maintenance expenditm-e, statement of 185 

Remarks upon ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 185 

Industrial Department, statement of financial operations of ... ... ... ... 186 

Reformatory Buildings, description and woodcut of 186-187 

Andrew Mercek Ontario Reformatory for Females, Act passed for the organiza- 
tion of 188 

Industrial Refuge for Girls, Act passed respecting the 188 

Buildings, design of, is in most advanced style 188 

Accommodation of buUdings, statement of and remarks upon ... 188 

Commitment to Reformatory, method of ... ... ... ... ... ... 189 

Inmates, employment of, remarks upon best method for the 189 

Discipline to be observed, remarks upon ... ... ... ... ... ... 190 

Religious instruction, method of imparting 190 

Industrial Refuge for Girls, Portion of building to be used for purposes of ... 190 

Commitment to Refuge, method of ... 191 

Officers and employes of the Reformatory and Refuge to be females 192 

Officers, list of, for whom appropriation will be required ... ... ... ... 192 

Buildings, description and woodcut of 193-194 



PAET III. 

INSTITUTIONS FOR THE EDUCATION OF THE DEAF AND DUMB, AND 

THE BLIND 195-211 



Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, statistics regading pupils of 

First inspection made on 18th February 

Pupils, number of in residence, and movements of 

Deaf-mutes, number of, kept at home 

Officer of Institution to visit deaf-mutes throughout the Province 

Pupils in satisfactory condition 

Literary classes, number of, and how taught 

Articulation class, commencement of 

Classes, good discipline of 

Shoe and carpenter shops, work in 

Institution, condition of ... ... ... ... ... ... . 



195-196 
196 
196 
196 
196 
196 
196 
196 
196 
196 
196 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



PAGE. 

New laundry and bakery in use 197 

Structural alterations and repaii'S ordered to be done ... ... ... ... ... 197 

Financial affaii's, instructions recorded regarding the 197 

Second visit made on lOtli April ... 197 

Visible speech class doing good work 197 

Inmates, number and condition of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 197 

Arrears for board of pupils, matter to be laid before Lieut.-Governor in Council ... 197 

Supplies, requisition for, examined ... ... ... ... ... ... 197 

Visits made on 13th and 30th September 197 

Dr. Palmer, resignation of, and temporary appointment of Mr. Mathison ... ... 197 

Mr. Mathison, appointment of, as superintendent ... ... ... ... ... 198 

Supervising teacher, Mr. Coleman to take position of ... ... ... ... ... 198 

Institution, population of and movements of inmates ... ... ... ... 198 

Teaching staff, extent of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 198 

Monitorial tsaching, system of, to be enquired into ... ... ... ... ... 198 

Pupils, appearance of, satisfactory ... ... ... ... ... ... 198 

Institution in commendable condition ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 199 

Hardwood flooring, estimate to be submitted for material for ... ... 199 

Bedsteads, desks, pictures, etc., appropriation to be asked for 199 

Coal-shed required ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 199 

Farm and garden, products of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 199 

Pay-list, Bursar authoriiied to make changes in 199 

Educational department, examination of by Dr. Carlyle recommended ... ... 199 

Report of Dr. Carlyle on result of examination ... ... ... ... ... ...199-202 

Maintenance expenditures, statement of ... ... ... ... ... 202 

Institution buildings, description and wood-cut of ... ... ... ... ...202-203 

Institution for the Blixd, Statistics regarding the pupils of 204 

Fu'st inspection made on 11th February 205 

Appearance and health of pupUs ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ••• 205 

Pneumonia, death of pupil from ... ... ' ... ... ... ... ... ... 205 

Blind persons, high temperature required for ... ... ... ... ... ... 205 

Steam-heating requirements, required supplementing ... ... ... ... ... 205 

Literary department, additional teacher for ... ... ... ... ... ... 205 

Second inspection made on 11th June ... ... ... ... ... ... ■•• 205 

Expenditures on capital appropriation authorized ... ... ... ... ... 205 

Steam-pump, re-boring of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ••• ••• 205 

Telephone service, Institution to be connected with ... ... ... ... ... 205 

Visitation of blind during vacation, teachers to be detailed for the duty 205 

Principal instructed to move into the house built for him ... ... ... ••• 205 

Third inspection made on 16th and 17th October ... 205 

Movements of pupils 205 

Blind persons retained at home through poverty of parents 206 

Teaching and iustructipg staff, size of 206 

Literary classes examined ... ... ... •.. •.• ••• ••• ••• ••• 206 

Progress of literary department ... 206 

Musical classes effectively organized 206 

xxi. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



PAGE. 

Industrial training sustains its practical character ... ... ... ... ... 206 

Health of pupils generaUy good ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 207 

Pupils, examination of, by oculists ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 207 

Condition of institution, excellent 207 

Improvements and extensions requhed on female side ... ... ... ... 207 

Bakery and meat store unfitted for the purposes ... ... ... ... ... 207 

Bursar's books examined ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 207 

Appropriations in some instances found insufficient ... ... ... ... ... 207 

Books, purchase of, authorized ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 208 

Socks for public institutions, to be knitted ... ... ... ... ... ... 208 

Monitorial instructor, female pupil to be appointed as ... ... ... ... 208 

Capital account, requirements upon, considered ... ... ... ... ... 208 

Maintenance expenditures, statement of ... ... ... ... ... ... 208 

Buildings, description and woodcut of 208-209 

Expenditures of institutions for the Deaf and Dumb and the Bhnd, statement of, 

in detail ... 209-211 



PAET IV. 

HOSPITALS AND CHAEITABLE INSTITUTIONS 212-293 

Hospitals, Table of movements of patients in, during official year ... ... ... 212 

Eemarks thereupon ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 213 

Out-door patients, number of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 213 

Hospital accommodation, table shewing the ... ... ... ... ... ... 213 

Hospitals greatly improved during the past five years ... ... ... ... 214 

Admissions to hospitals, where made from ... ... ... ... ... ... 214 

Eeligious denominations and nationalities, of patients ... ... ... ... 214 

Ailments and diseases of patients, table of ... ... ... ... ... ...215-217 

Table shewing total number of patients, and theh collective and average stay ... 217 

Remarks thereupon 218 

Average period of hospital residence, greater than necessary 218 

Causes of such high average explained ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 218 

Lying ic cases, prolonged residence of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 218 

Report to Government regarding such lengthy residence 218 

Orders in Council fixing time for which hospital rates shall be allowed for im- 
proper hospital cases, and for lying in cases, passage of recommended "... 219 

Orders passed and acted upon ... 220 

Table shewing the collective stay of patients, the deductions to be made for ex- 
tended stay of lying in cases, and of improper cases, and the number of days 

for which full hospital rates are to be allowed 220 

Table shewing receipts of hospitals, and a comparison of one-fourth of such receipts 

with the supplementary grant 221 

Remarks thereupon 222 

Tables shewing the net amount to which each hospital is entitled as Government 

aid for 1880 228 

xxii. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



Table shewing maintenance expenditures of each hospital and the average daily 

cost per patient ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 224 

Separate Inspection Eepoets upon Hospitals 225-244 

General Hospital, Toronto, and branches ...225-228 

City Hospital, Hamilton 228-230 

General Hospital, Kingston 230-232 

Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston 232-234 

General Protestant Hospital, Ottawa 234-286 

General Boman Catholic Hospital, Ottawa ... ... ... ... ... ...233-238 

General Hospital, London ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...288-239 

General and Marine Hospital, St. Catharines ... ... ... ... ... ... 239-241 

General Hospital, Guelph 241-243 

St. Joseph's Hospital, Guelph 243-244 

Houses of Refuge, table shewing movements of inmates of ... ... ... ... 245 

Eefuges and Orphanages combined, shuuld be divided ... ... ... ... 246 

Remarks upon statistical table ... ... .. ... ... ... ... ... 246 

Sex, religious denominations, nationahties, and previous residences of inmates ... 246 

Table shewing number of persons cared for, and their aggregate and average stay 247 
Table shewing the revenue of the Eefuges, etc., and the net amount of aid to which 

each is entitled ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 248 

Table shewing cost of maintaining Eefuges and the average cost per inmate per day 249 

Separate Eeport upon Houses of Refuge 250-267 

House of Industry, Toronto ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...250-251 

House of Providence, Toronto ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...251-253 

Home for Incurables, Toronto 253-254 

House of Eefuge, Hamilton ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...254-255 

Home for Aged Women, Hamilton ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 256 

House of Industry, Kingston 256-258 

House of Providence, Kingston ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...258-259 

Protestant Home for Aged and Friendless, London ... ... ... ... ... 259-261 

Eoman Catholic Orphan Asylum (Eefuge branch), London ... ... ... ... 261 

St. Patrick's House of Eefuge, Ottawa 261-263 

St. Charles Hospce, Ottawa 263-264 

House of Providence, Guelph 264-265 

Protestant Home (Refuge branch), St. Catharines 265-266 

The Home, St. Thomas 266-267 

Orphans' Asylums, tables shewing movements of inmates of ... ... ... ... 268 

Sex, nationahty, religion, and previous residence of children admitted to Orphanages 269 

Table shewing the net amount due to each Orphanage as Government aid ... 270 

Maintenance expenditures, table of 271 

Separate Inspection Eeports upon Orphan Asylums ... ... 272-287 

Roman Catholic Orphan Asylum, Toronto 272-273 

Orphans' Home and Female Aid Society, Toronto 273-274 

Girls' Home, Toronto ... 274 

xxiii. 



43 Yictoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



Boys' Home, Toronto 
Kewsboj-s' Lodgings, Toronto 
Infants' Home, Toronto, ... 
St. Nicholas Home, Toronto 

St. Mary's Orphan Asylum, Hamilton 

Protestant Orphan Asylum, Hamilton ... 
Boys' Home, Hamilton 

Girls' Home, Toronto 

Orphans" Home, Kingston 

Orphanage of the House of Providence, Kingston 

Hotel Dieu Orphan Asylum, Kingston ... 

Orphans' Home, Ottawa ... 

St. Patrick's Orphan Asyliun, Ottawa ... 

St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum, Ottawa ... 

Roman Catholic Orphans' Home, London 

Protestant Oi-phans' Home, London 

Protestant Home, St. Catharines 

St. Agatha's Orphan Asylum, St. Agatha ... 

Magdalen Asylums, table shewing operations of ... 

Eeh^ious denominations, nationalities, and previous residence of persons admitted 
Table shewing aggregate stay of inmates and the amount of aid due to each Asylum 
Table shewing to;al expenditures of each Asylum and the avei-age cost per inmate 

Separate Reports upon Magdalen Asylums ... 

Magdalen Asylum, Toronto .'.. 

Good Shepherd Refuge for Fallen Women, Toronto ... 

Home for the Friendless, Hamilton 

Good Shepherd Magdalen Asylum, Ottawa ... ... 

Conclusion of the Inspector's Report 



PAGE. 

274-275 
275-276 
276-277 

277 
277-278 
278-279 

279 

280 
280-281 
281-282 

282 
282-283 
283-284 

284 
284-285 

285 

286 
286-287 

288 
288 
289 
289 

290-293 
200 
290-291 
291-292 
292-293 

293 



XXlV. 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



APPENDIX. 



PAGE. 

Report of the Medical Superintendent of the Asylum for the Insane, Toronto 296-325 

«« " «« «• " Loudon 326-350 

«• " " " " Kingston 351-370 

«» " •• " Hamilton. ... 371-385 

" " " of the Asylum for Idiots, Orillia 386-395 

" Superintendent of the Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, Belleville ... 396-413 

" Physician of the Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, Belleville 413-414 

" Principal of the Institution for the BUnd, Brantford 415-431 

Physician " " " 432-433 

" Warden of the Central Prison of Ontario 434-440 

" Surgeon " " " 441-444 

" Superintendent of the Provincial Reformatory, Penetanguishene 445-446 

" Protestant Chaplain " " " 447 

" Roman Catholic " " " " 448 

" Protestant Schoolmaster " " " 448-450 

Roman Catholic " " " " 450-451 

" Surgeon " " " 451-452 



ERKATA. 



On page 4, line 7, the number of persons treated in Hospital in 1879 should read 4,612, instead 
of 5,124 ; and on Line 11 the number of inmates of Orphan Asylums and other public chari- 
ties in 1879 should be 3,147, instead of 3,135 ; and on line 12 the total of the figm-es given 
should be 24,643, instead of 25,143. 

Page 9, in table of movements of Asylum population, the average daily number of patients in 
the Hamilton Asylum should be 242, and the total of the column 2,208.67, instead ol 
2,223.67 ; and in the 8th line from that table the figures 2,223.67 should read 2,208.67. 



XXV. 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



n^uUv at §x'mm mA f uHic Clliai'iticsi, 



FOR THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 



Parliament Buildings, 

Toronto, November, 1879. 

To His Excellency, the Honourable Donald Alexander Macdonald, 
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May it please Your Excellency: — 

The Inspector of Prisons and Public Charities, in compliance with law, re- 
spectfully presents his Twelfth Annual Report upon the Asylums, Prisons and 
Public Charities of the Province of Ontario, for the year ending the 30th Sep- 
tember, 1879. 

In the preface to his tenth and eleventh annual reports, the Inspector very 
fully reviewed the organization, working and progress of those Institutions since 
the date of Confederation, besides giving a detailed statement of the official 
duties devolving upon him in their supervision and management. In the pre- 
sent preface, he will contine himself to a brief synopsis of their working and 
the results thereof during the official year, and of a few of the most import- 
ant occurrences in that period. 

, Asylums for the Insane. 

The building designed for refractory and noisy patients, the erection of 
which was commenced last year upon the grounds of the London Asylum, wa.s 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (ISo. 8.) A. 1880 

completed and occupied in February last, thereby increasing the capacity of that 
Institution to 907 beds. 

The two nev.' wings to the Hamilton Asylum, which, in the Inspector's last 
report, were said to be in progress, have also been completed and occupied during 
the past }\.d,v, whi-;h has added 332 beds, making the receiving capacity of that 
Asylum 532. 

Through these additions the five Asylums situated in Toronto, London, 
Kingston, Hamilton, and Orillia, now afford accommodation for 2,692 patients, 
and at the close of the official year there were 2,325 in residence. From this 
statement, it will be apparent that there were 367 vacancies for the insane in the 
Asylums of the Province on the 30th September last. These vacancies, however, 
were confined to the Western Asylums at London and Hamilton. In the three 
remaining Asylums, every bed is occupied, and admissions can only be granted 
when vacancies occur through discharges and deaths. It will, therefore, be readily 
seen that the insane in the Eastern Section of the Province are placed at very 
great disadvantage, and much inconvenience and expense are caused by their 
having to be transferred to an Asylum, distant from one hundred to three hiindred 
miles from their homes, relatives and friends. For this reason, the Inspector has 
again recommended that another wing be added to the Kingston Asylum, so as to 
provide space for 150 additional patients. 

For a considerable time past the accommodation for Idiots in the Orillia 
Asylum has been exhausted, and during last year temporary provision had to be 
made for that class in two of the wards of the Hamilton Asylum. In view of 
this state of things, the Inspector has renewed the recommendation made in his 
last report for an addition to be made to the Orillia buildings, of sufficient dimen- 
sion to accommodate 150 inmates. 

If the foregoing recommendations be approved of and acted upon by the Gov- 
ernment and Legislature, the Inspector is of opinion that the Province will be 
sufficiently provided with accomuiodation for the insane and idiotic for the next 
ten years.' 

During the year ending 30th September 1879, 515 persons were admitted to 
the various Asylums, and, including those previously admitted, a total number of 
2665 were under lodgment and treatment in that period. 

Prisons and Reformatories. 

The establishments coming under this heading comprise forty-four County 
and District Gaols, the Central Prison at Toronto, the Reformator}-^ for Boys at 
Peuetanguishene, and the Reformatory for Women and Industrial School for Girls 
now being erected in Toronto. 

These Provincial Institutions with tlie Dominion Penitentiary at Kingston, 
form perhaps one of the most complete and effective prison and reformatory 

2 



\ 



43 A^ictoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



systems on the continent, and when the two last named Institutions are comple- 
ted, means will then be provided for the grading and classifying in the respective 
establishments, of every kind of offender. 

The Reformatory for Women and the Industrial School for Girls, are now 
well advanced in construction and will, it is expected, be ready for occupation 
in April next. 

The contemplated changes in the management and discipline of the Refor- 
matory for Boys, as foreshadowed in the last Annual Report, have been effected, 
and its objectionable penal features are thereby being eradicated, and the Insti- 
tution has now fairly entered upon its work as a Reformatory and Industrial 
School. As these changes necessitate structural additions and alterations, a re- 
commendation is made for an appropriation to meet the cost of carrying them out. 

The Central Prison continues to rank as one of the most useful and effective 
establishments in our prison system. Its discipline and the general management 
of its affairs are in the highest degree satisfactory. 

It is a matter for congratulation to find that the returns for this year shew 
a considerable falling off in the number of persons committed to the Common Gaols 
of the Province. In 1877 the commitments reached the highest point in the 
history of the Province, numbering 13,481. In 1878 the number decreased to 
12,030, and during the official year just closed, it has been still further reduced to 
11,220. 

Institutions for the Deaf and Dumb, and the Blind. 

These important public Institutions continue to perform the work devolving 
upon them in a very satisfactory manner. During the year, 269 deaf and dumb 
youths were under instruction in the Institution in Belleville, and 200 blind per- 
sons in the Institution in Brantford, and it is likely that the numbers will be very 
considerably increased during the next twelve months. The former Institution is 
sufficiently extensive in its structural capacity to meet all demands made upon its 
accommodation for many years to come, but the largely increased number of 
blind persons seeking admission to the latter Institution, will render it necessary 
to add another wing to the building, as designed in the original plans. 

Hospitals and Charitable Institutions. 

The Institutions of this class in receipt of Provincial aid under the provisions 
of the " Charity Aid Act," now number 47 ; namely, 10 General Hospitals, ] 2 
Houses of Refuge, 4 Magdalen Asylums, and 21 Orphan Asylums. The admissions 
to these various Institutions during the twelve months aggregated 9,610. 

The following statement shews the total number of persons who became 
inmates, during the year, of all the public Institutions subject to supervision and 
inspection, as compared with the preceding corresponding period. 

3 



43 Yictoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 






1878. 1879. 

Prisoners confined in the various Gaols, Prisons, and 

Reformatories of the Province 13,293 12,399 

Persons of unsound mind maintained in the various 

Asylums 2,546 2,605 

Deaf mutes and blind persons admitted to the two In- 
stitutions for these classes 452 469 

Patients treated in Hospitals aided by Government funds 4,367 5,124 

Indigent persons maintained in Refuges aided by Gov- 
ernment funds 1,279 1,351 

Inmates of Orphan Asylums and other public Charities 

aided by the Province 3,138 3,135 

25,075 25,143 

The charge upon the Treasury of the Province for the maintenance of such 
of these Institutions as are exclusively owned and managed by Government, to- 
gether with the aid granted to Hospitals and Benevolent Institutions, which are 
under Municipal and Corporate control, was as follows : — 

Asylum for the Insane, Toronto 883,725 22 

Asylum for the Insane, London 95,681 74 

Asylum for the Insane, Kingston 51,345 85 J 

Asylum for the Insane, Hamilton. 37,186 42 

Asylum for Idiots, Orillia 18,955 14 

Totai cost of maintaining Asylums §286,894 37 

Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, Belleville §38,589 50 

Institution for the Blind, Brantford 29,515 15 

Total cost of maintaining the Institwtions for * 

the Deaf and Dumb and the Blind S68,104 65 

Oommon Gaol Maintenance (only about one-third of this 
expenditure paid by the Province, the balance by 
Counties) 8122,354 08 

Central Prison, Toronto (inclusive of expenditures for 

manufacturing purposes) 74,145 29 

Provincial Reformatory, Penetanguishene 28,427 60 

Total cost of maintaining Prisons and Re- 
formatories 8224,926 97 

Forward 8579,925 99 

4 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



Brought forivard So7l),925 99 

Aid to Hospitals S48,700 83 

Aid to Houses of Refuge 16,609 19 

Aid to Orphan and Magdalen Asylums 13,410 42 

Total aid to Charities $73,720 44 



Total cost of maintaining Public Institutions 

and aiding Charities S653,646 43 

The revenue derived from the Institutions owned by the Government, during 
the official year, is shewn in the following statement : — 

Asylum for the Insane, Toronto S23,409 05 

Asylum for the Insane, London 5,740 93 

Asylum for the Insane, Kingston 1,733 10 

Asylum for the Insane, Hamilton 1,011 10 

Asylum for Idiots, Orillia 1,004 08 

S32,898 26 

Institution for the Deaf and Damb, Belleville 600 00 

Central Prison, Toronto *64,455 10 

Provincial Reformatory, Penetanguishene 3,208 41 



Total revenue $101,161 77 



As many Members of the Legislature and others specially interested in the 
management of our Asylums, Prisons and Public Charities, are unable to make a 
personal visitation of all of these Institutions, it has been thought desirable, in 
order that they may inform themselves of the character and extent of the struc- 
tures, in which the afflicted, criminal and dependent classes of the community are 
lodged, to insert in the present report wood-cuts of the ten Provincial Institutions. 
These wood-cuts, together with a description of the structures, will precede the 
separate reports on each of the Institutions, namely, the five Asylums for the 
Insane at Toronto, London, Kingston, Hamilton and Orillia respectively, the 
Institution for the Education of the Deaf and Dumb at Belleville, and for the 
Blind at Brantford, the Reformatory for Boys at Penetanguishene, and the Cen- 
tral Prison, the Reformatory for Females and the Industrial School for Girls at 
Toronto. 

♦ This amount includes the Insurance moneys received for manufactured goods and raw material 
■dertroyed by the fire, which took place at the Central Prison on the 13th November, 1878. 



43 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



PAET I. 



ASYLUMS FOE THE INSANE. 



The number of insane under public accommodation in the Province of 
Ontario, on the 30th September, 1879, and the manner in which they were dis- 
tributed amongst the various establishments on that day, are shewn in the follow- 
ing summary, together with similar information in respect to the number and 
distribution of the insane on the oOth September, 1878 : — 



Asylum for the Insane, Toronto 

Asylum for the Insane, London 

Asylum for the Insane, Kingston . 

Asylum for the Insane, Hamilton 

Idiot Wards of the Hamilton Asylum . . . 
Asylum for Idiots, Orillia 



Kingston Penitentiary , 
Common Gaols ...... 



30th September, 1879. 



Males. FemalcB Total 



342 

358 

208 

132 

20 

78 



1138 

21 
14 



Total under public accommodation 1173 



332 

384 

215 

173 

6 

77 



1187 

1 
15 



1203 



674 
742 
423 
305 
26 
155 



2325 

22 
29 

2376 



30th September, 1878. 



Males. Females Total. 



340 
351 
210 

82 

75 



1064 

20 
32 



I 1116 



331 
356 
208 
119 

71 



1085 

1 
12 



1093 



677 
707 
418 
201 

146 



2149 

21 
44 



2214 



The above summary shews that the number of i.isane under Governmental 
care had increased from 2,214 on the 30th September, 1878, to 2,.37G on the 30th 
September, 1879, being an increase of 1G2 in the Asylum population in the last 
twelve months. 

It will be observed that the increase has chiefly taken place in the Asylums in 
London and Hamilton, to which extensive additions have been completed and 
occupied during the year 

At the London Asylum, where a large structure has been provided for the 
more refractory and troublesome patients, the process of drafting that class from 
the general population of the main Asylum and removing them to this new build- 

6 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



ing, has been ,^oing on during the year. This withdrawal, together with the 
transfer in the preceding year of a considerable number of quiet chronic patients 
to the cottages built on the Asylum grounds for that class, left a large number of 
vacant beds in the main building at the disposal of the insane in the Western 
Asylum division of the Province. The gradual filling up of these vacancies, chiefly 
with acute cases, is the cause of the increase in the population of the London 
Asylum from 707 to 742. 

A still greater increase has taken place in the Hamilton A.sylam, owing to 
the completion of the new wings which had been in course of erection during the 
past two years. These additions were read}^ for the reception of patients on the 
15th lEarch, and from that date to the 30th September, no less than 148 patients 
were admitted, which has increased the Asylum population at the close of the 
year to 331, as compared with 201 on the 30th September, 1878. 

It should be stated, however, that a considerable portion of this great increase 
in the population of the Hamilton Asylum, is due to the setting apart of two of 
the new wards for the accommodation of idiots, 27 of whom were admitted since 
the opening of these wards in July. This became necessary as the space at the 
Orillia Asylum, which is exclusively for idiots, has been completely exhausted for 
the past eighteen months. 

The slight decrease in the number of patients in the Toronto Asylum, viz., 
fiom 677 to 674, was caused by the existence at the close of the year of a few 
^•acancies in the superior paying wards, but which have since been filled up. 

At the Kingston Asylum the population increased from 418 to 423, every bed 
in the Asylum being occupied at the close of the year. 

The number of inmates in the Asylum for Idiots at Orillia, had increased 
from 146 to 1-55, thus completely exhausting the space in that Institution. 

It will be seen that there was an addition of only one in the number of in- 
sane in the Dominion Penitentiary at Kingston, and that the number of that class 
in the Common Gaols on the evening of the 30th September, 1879, was 29, as com- 
pared with 44 on the same day in the preceding year. Seventeen of these persons 
reported to be in Gaol custody were transferred to Asylums within a few days after 
the close of the year, one died, and the papers in the remaining cases were either 
incomplete or shewed that the persons committed as insane were not suitable for 
admission to a curative asylum. 

Such are the changes, in the number and distribution of the insane, which 
have taken place in the Asylums of the Province during the year. 

The very marked increase in the population of the Asylums calls for exami- 
nation. At the outset I must record my belief that it is not entirely, if at all, due 
to a positive increase in mental disease, or at any rate, in abnormal proportion to 
the natural increase in the general population of the Province. It is a painful 
and self-evident fact that there is an increase in the number of insane persons 
under Asylum accommodation, but that circumstance does not necessaidly prove 
that there is a corresponding increase in insanity itself. In the first place, excep- 
tion must be taken to the generally accepted conclusion that the number of ad- 
missions to the Asylums during a given period, provides a proper basis for deter- 
mining the extent and prevalence of insanity in a community. 

Admissions to Asylums are largely governed and regulated by the character 
and extent of the accommodation furnished for the care and treatment of the in- 
sane. If asylum construction and extension just cease when all known cases of 
insanity are provided for, and no provision is made for the future, there must, of 
necessity, be an accumulation of the insane in private houses, and as soon as the 
country is again forced to provnde additional Asylum accommodation, this accumula- 
tion of mouths or years, as the case ma}^ be, will, to a large extent, form the first 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



charge upon the increased space. It would, therefore, be manifestly unfair to as- 
sume that an abnormally large number of admissions, consequent upon the open- 
ing of a new Asylum, or the enlargement of an old one, is an evidence that insan- 
ity is on the increase. The augmentation of an asylum population under such 
circumstances, is simply the liquidation of deferred obligations, which the country 
owed to its insane, but which, for financial or other reasons, was postponed for a 
time For statistical purposes, such an increase in the number of the insane in 
recognized confinement, should be spread over the series of years during which 
the cases of insanity were accumulating, instead of being looked upon as an in- 
dication of an increase of insanity during the limited pei'iod in which the addition 
to the asylum population actually took place. So far as the admissions of the 
past year are concerned, this is clearly the proper view to take, for an examina- 
tion of the papers upon which they were based, shews that the insanity of forty- 
two per cent, of the persons admitted was of man}^ years' standing, and that in 
only a proportionately small number of cases, was it of recent and acute develop- 
ment. This phase of the question is, however, more fully referred to under the 
heading of Admissions. 

Then, again, the excess in the number of idiots under accommodation during 
last 3'ear, over the number in the previous yeai, should be deducted from the ag- 
gregate increase, before figures can be obtained upon which to form an estimate 
of the extent of lunacy, even if Asylum admissions be taken as the basis. The 
persons admitted during the past year to the Idiot Asylum at Orillia and to the 
Branch Wards at Hamilton, were in nearly every instance congenital idiots, and 
as such had formed part of the insane population of the Province during the 
whole of their lives. Further, there are the numerous re- admissions to Asylums to 
be taken into consideration, not only in the cases of recurrent insanity, but in 
those where patients have been removed from the asylums by their friends in a 
partially recovered or entirely unrecovered condition, and have again to be returned. 
These re-admissions are, of course, all re-entered in the asylum registers, and some- 
times very largely swell the admissions of the year. Deducting from the aggregate 
admissions of the year all cases of chronic insanity, of idiocy, and of re-admission, it 
will be found that the increase in insanity, as indicated by the admission of recent 
and acute cases to the Asylums,is no greater than might be expected from the nonnal 
growth of the population. 

How many lunatics there were in private houses at the close of the 3'ear, I 
have not the means of knowing, but from all I can learn there were never fewer 
at any other time in the history of the Province. The Medical Superintendent of 
the London Asylum reports that every case of lunacy in the Western Section of 
the Province, which has come to his knowledge, has been promptly dealt with, 
and if found to be a proper subject for Asylum residence, admission has been 
awarded immediately. The same condition of things exists in the South Western 
Division, which is attached to the Hamilton Asylum. The exhaustion of the ac- 
commodation at the Toronto and Kingston Asylums, and the consequent limitation 
of admissions to the number of vacancies caused by deaths and discharges, have 
not enabled applications to be so promptly dealt with in the Central and Eastern 
Divisions, but even there every acute case of insanity, for which application has 
been made, has been provided for, and at the time of writing this report, I am 
not aware of a single urgent case of lunacy in a private family. 

It is true there may be a few persons, who, from sensitive motives or family 
reasons, seek to retain their insane at home, until they are compelled to send them 
to an asylum owing to the development of dangerous proclivities, but I apprehend 
that the number of that class is very small. As a rule, there can be no better 
means of ascertaining the number of insane in a community, than by letting it 

8 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



be generally known that there are vacancies for all proper cases ; and that has 
been done during the past year in this Province. 

To sum up under this heading of the Asylum Report, and after a very criti- 
cal examination of the statements and figures in my possession relating to the 
insane, I feel warranted in arriving at the following conclusions : — 

First — That with the exception of idiots and a few cases of long-standing 
lunacy, all proper cases of insanity are already, or are in course of being placed, 
under treatment; 

Second — That the increase in the population of the Asylums during last 
year, is due to the opening of new wards in the London and Hamilton Asylums, 
and that the admissions of the year largely comprise idiots, chronic lunatics, re- 
admissions, and only a normal number of acute cases; and 

Third — ^That lunacy is not increasing in the Province of Ontario to a greater 
extent than is the ordinary population. 

Movements of Asylum Populations. 









No. remaining in 


No. admitted during 


Total number under 


.a 
S 










Asylums on 30th 


year ending 30th 


treatment 


during 








September, 


1878. 


September, 1879. 


year 






^■2 












6 






6 




H) p. 






























for the Insane 


Toronto . . 




S 

0) 


'3 

O 

H 


63 


S 


3 

o 


Is 


s 


o 
H 


> 


Asylum 


347 


331 


678 ' 


39 


102 


410 


370 


780 


676-61 


Asylum 


for the Insane, 


London . . 


351 


356 


707 


80 


88 


168 


431 


444 


875 


722-36 


Asylum 


for the Insane, 


Kingston . 


210 


208 


418 


22 


36 


58 


232 


244 


476 


418-52 


Asylum 


for the Insane, 


Hamilton . 


82 


119 


201 


91 


73 


164 


173 


192 


365 


257-00 


Asylum 


for Idiots, OrilHa 


75 


71 


146 ! 

j 


14 


9 


.3| 


89 


80 


169 


149-18 




1065 


1085 


2150 


270 


245 


515 


1335 


1330 


2665 


2223-67 



This table shews that .515 lunatics and idiots were admitted to Asylum 
accommodation during the twelve months ending 30th September, 1879, and that 
during that time 2665 were under lodgment and treatment, as compared with 2546 
in the corresponding period of the previous year. It further shews that the daily 
average jiopulation of the Asylums was 2,228'67 as against 2,06644 in 1877-tS. 

Table No. 5 shews that of the 2,325 persons who were reported in resid- 
ence at the close of the year, 99 had been Asylum inmates for twenty five years and 
upwards, 96 from twenty to twenty five years, 205 from fifteen to twenty years, 215 
from ten to fifteen years, 521 from five to ten 3'^ears, 548 from two to five years, 
and 641 for periods under two years. 

Here it seems proper that a table should be inserter], shewing the receiving 
capacity of each Asylum, based upon the number of beds that can be made up 
without encroaching upon the space requii'ed for other purposes, and paying due 
regard to sanitary and cubic space regulations. This table will be continued in 
subsequent reports, in order that the number of vacancies, if any, at the close of 
each year may be made known. 

9 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



Asylum Accommodation. 





Number of beds 
in Associated 
Hooms. 


Number of beds 
in Single 
Eooms. 


Total number of 
beds in Asy- 
lum. 


Number of pa- 
tients under 
accommodation 
on 30th Septr., 
1879. 


Number of va- 
cancies on the 
30th Sep., 1879. 


A.sylum for the Insane, Toronto 


456 
628 
316 
410 
127 


221 
279 
114 
122 
19 


677 
907 
430 
532 
146 


674 
742 
423 
331 
155* 


3 


Asylum for the Insane, London 


165 

7 


Asylum for the Insane, Hamilton 

Asylum for the Insane, Orillia 


201 








1937 


755 


2692 


2325 


376 



* Some of the younger boys sleep two in a bed. 

It will be noticed from the figures in the above table that the total Asylum 
accommodation is equal to 2,692 beds, and that of these 2,316 were occupied on 
the 30th September last, leaving 876 vacancies as the available space. 

Admissions. 



It has already been shewn that the admissions of the year aggregated 515. 
From a further analysis of the figures and an examination of Table No. 2 at the 
end of this part of the Report, it will be seen that 251 of these admissions were 
efi'ected by the removal of lunatics and idiots from the various Common Gaols 
under the authority of the Lieutenant-Governor's warrant, and the remaining 264 
were received from private houses upon the certificates of three medical men, und^r 
the provisions of Section 8 of Chapter 220 of the Revised Statutes of Ontario. 

I have already stated that a very large proportion of the admissions of the 
year were long standing cases of insanity. Table No. 4 gives a synopsis of the 
information respecting the period of insanitj", gathered from the queries which 
have to be answered and subscribed to before admission to an Asylum is awarded. 

An examination of this table shews that of the 515 persons admitted to 
Asylums during the year, 50, or a fraction under ten per cent., were idiots ; that 21 
persons had been insane for periods ranging from twelve to eighteen months, 18 
from eighteen months to two years, 20 from two to three years, 14 from three to 
four years, 10 from four to five years, 6 from five to six years, 4 from six to seven 
years, 2 from seven to eight years, 5 from eight to nine years, 32 from ten to 
twenty years and upwards, and 36 had been insane for an unknown period, making 
a total of 218 cases of long standing insanity. 

Of the remaining 297 persons admitted, 89 are reported to have been insane 
for under one month before admission, 65 from one to two months, 35 from 
two to three months, and 108 from three months to one year. 

Even deducting the 50 idiots, the admission of long-standing cases of insanity 
is unusually high this year, owing as previously stated to the opening of additions 
to the London and Hamilton Asylums. It is hoped that these cases are now nearly 
exhausted, and that the admissions during the current year will not only shew a 
large reduction numerically, but will be confined to acute and recent cases. 

10 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



Kespecting re-admissions, the returns made to me shew that of the 515 
admissions of the year, 460 were, so far as known, for the first time, 43 for the 
second, 8 for the third, and 4 for the fourth time and over. 

I expressed a hope in my last Annual Report that, when the increased asylum 
accommodation was provided, the commitment of lunatics to gaol would not be 
resorted to so much in the future, as in the past, and suggested as a means of ob- 
viating such a disagi'eeable necessity, that earlier application for admisvsion should 
be made by the friends of the insane to the Medical Superintendents of the Asylums. 
The statistics of this year, however, shew that so far from there being a reduction 
in the number of commitments to gaol, there has been a very considerable increase. 
I can come to no other conclusion than that this system is largely made use of by the 
relatives of the insane, in order to save the expense of examining the lunatics and of 
transferring them to an asylum, by placing the cost of that service upon the counties. 
There is, however, another view of the case, namely, that on application being 
made to a Medical Superintendent for the admission of an insane person, it has 
been refused, owing to the unfitness of the case, or because there did not appear 
to be any necessity, either with a view to cure or to ordinary care, for burdening 
the Province with the support of a person, who could be quite well cared for in a 
private house, or, if the relations were in indigent circumstances, by a Munici- 
pality. A refusal on the part of a Medical Superintendent to admit such a person, 
is generally ver}^ closely followed by committal to gaol, when under different cir- 
cumstances and supported by the S3'mpathy which attaches to prison custody, 
application is again made and frequently with better success. 

I have again to repeat, and chiefly for the information and guidance of the 
members of the Medical profession, that there is now veiy rarely any necessity 
for committing lunatics to gaol, if only timely and prompt application be made to 
the Medical Superintendent of the District Asylum for admission under the 
ordinaiy process. 

Included in the total number of admissions are 27 idiots received into the 
Hamilton Asylum, and 23 into the Orillia Asylum, thus reducing the number of 
lunatics admitted during the year to 465. Of the 515 admissions, including idiots, 
102 were assigned to the Asylum in Toronto, 168 to London, 58 to Kingston, 164 
to Hamilton, and 23 to Orillia. 

Table No. 2 gives in detail the counties from which the admis.sions of the 
year were drawn, and, as usual, proves that the localities in the immediate vicin- 
ity of the Asylums are the largest contributors to the population thereof. Thus, 
of the 515 admissions, the County of York, including the City of Toronto, sent 
88 patients, or 17 per cent, of the entire number admitted, Middlesex 7 per cent., 
Wentworth 5 per cent., Simcoe, 5 per cent.; Frontenac and the City of Kingston 
are exceptions to the rule, having only sent 11 patients. The other Counties from 
which the next greatest number of patients were received, were Northumberland 
and Durham 19, Kent 19, Huron 18, Grey and Oxford each 15, Brant and Ontario 
each 14, Leeds and Grenville, Carleton, Perth and Wellington each 13. From the 
remainder of the Counties 12 and under were admitted. 

I again insert the table given in last year's report, affording the following 
information : (1) The number of patients admitted to the Asylums each year since 
Confederation ; (2) the total number under treatment each year ; and (3) the 
number of patients remaining under accommodation at the close of each year: — 



11 



43 Victoria.' 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 





Admissions during 
each year. 


Total number under 

treatment during 

each year. 


Number remaining in 
Asylums on 30th Sep- 
tember in each year. 




1867 1 

18f58 j 

1869 


210 

292 
280 
353 
351 
319 
323 
326 
468 
578 
547 
515 


1020 

1284 
1428 
1553 
1717 
1780 
1828 
1925 
2118 
2390 
2546 
2665 


992 

1148 


1870 

1871 


1200 
1366 


1872 


1461 


1873 


1505 


1874 


1599 


1875 


1650 


1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 


1812 
1999 
2149 
2325 




4562 







The following information in respect to the nationalities, religious denomina- 
tion, and social state of the Asylum admissions of the present and past years, is 
compiled from the registers of the various Institutions : — 

Natio'iialities. 



Canadian 

Irish 

English 

Scotch 

United States 

Other countries and unknown 

Religious Denotnirtations. 

Church of England 

Roman Catholic 

Presbyterian 

Methodist 

Other denominations 

Social State. 

Married 

Unmarried 



ose admitted 
ig past j^ear. 

285 


total 
admissions. 

2975 


m 


2352 


70 


1216 


39 


1016 


14 


184 


35 


381 


51 


8124 


97 


2163 


92 


1817 


111 


1762 


180 


1421 


85 


961 


515 


812+ 


240 


4128 


275 


3996 



515 



8124 



12 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



Discharges. 

The foliowino- table shews the whole number of dischai-ffes, which have taken 
place from the various Asylums during the year, and the mental condition in 
which the patients lett the Institutions : — 



1 


M. 


F. 


Total. 


Cured. 


Improved. 


Unimproved. 




M. 

17 
i 34 

13 
7 


71 


F. 

17 
30 
12 
5 

64 


T. 

34 1 
64 
25 
12 

135 


M. F. 


1 
T. i 

27 
16 

3 

1 


47 


M. 

1 6 

1 4 

1 

2 

2 

15 


F. 1 T. 


Asylum for the Insane, Toronto 

Asj'lum for the Insane, London 

Asylum for the Insane, Kingston 

Asylum for the Insane, Hamilton .... 


40 
48 
15 
10 

2 


30 

40 

15 

6 


70 
88 
30 
16 

2 


17 

10 

1 

1 



29 


10 
6 
2 



18 


3 9 

4 8 

1 1 2 

1 3 

1 
2 








115 

1 


91 


206 


9 24 



The figures in this table shr'w that 206 discharges were made from all the 
Asylums during the year, and that 135 of the patients so discharged were sent 
home as recovered, 47 improved, and 24 unimproved. The returns of last year 
in this relation were confined to the three receiving Asylums in Toronto, London 
and Kingston, and shewed that the rate of recoveries was equal to 32.50 per cent. 
of the year's admissions, and 7.25 per cent, of the number under treatment. The 
returns for the present year for the same Asylums shew the percentage of recov- 
eries to be 37.50 on the admissions, and 5.77 on the whole nuiuber under treatment. 

Now that the Hamilton Asylum is constituted a receiving Institution, and a 
section of the Province is assigned to it for that purpose, its lunatic population 
must in future be taken into account for all statistical purposes. As its poj)ulation 
is nearly all of the chronic class, this inclusion, of course, will for the present cause 
a more unfavourable exhibit of the general results of Asylum treatment. Includ- 
ing, therefore, the admissions to the Hamilton Asylum in the total number of 
patients under treatment (with the exception of idiots), it is shewn that the 
rate of cuies was equal to 29 per cent, of the admissions, and 5.46 per cent, of the 
number under treatment. 

The constantly increasing residuum of chronic cases accumulating in our 
Asylums, as well as the current admission of a large number of the same clas', 
provide but very poor material for a test of the results of Asylum treatment. 
From a return made to me by the various Medical Superintendents, it would ap- 
pear that out of the 2325 patients who were in Asylum residence at the close of 
the year, 2065 were hopelessly incurable, and that in regard to a considerable por- 
tion of the remainder, very grave doubts existed as to the ultimate results of 
treatment. It will therefore be readily se^^n that even under the most favourable 
circumstances, the jiercentage of cures must constitute but a very small proportion 
of the number of patients under treatment, and that based upon the admissions 
the ratio of recoveries entirely depends upon the class of patients admitted. 

From Table No. 6, it will be seen that of the 135 patients who were discharged 
cured, 2 had been under Asylum treatment for less than a month, 4 from one 
to two months, 17 from two to three months, 13 from three to four months, 15 
from four to five months, 13 from five to six months, 4 from six to seven months 

13 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



12 from seven to eight months, 7 from eight to nine months, 17 from nme months 
to a year, 10 from one year to eighteen months, 10 from eighteen months to two 
years, 5 from two to thi'ee years, and G were residents of the Asykims for periods 
of froui four to twelve years. 

Tables numbered 7 and 8, at the end of this section of the report, give the 
periods during which those patients who were discharged in an improved and un- 
improved condition, remained under treatment in the Asylums. It should again 
be stated that a large proportion of the last named class are taken home by their 
friends against the advice of the medical officers of the Asylums, and only to be 
again returned in a short time, and frequently in a much worse condition than 
wheniemoved. 

Discharges on Probation. 

Dining the year 92 patients were sent home on probation, and the following 
summary shews the distribution of such discharges amongst the four Asylums for 
the Insane : — 

Males. Females. Total. 

Asylum for the Insane, Toronto 7 9 16 

Asylum for the Insane, London 34 26 60 

Asylum for the Insane, Kingston 5 5 10 

Asylum for the Insane, Hamilton 3 3 6 

49 43 92 

Since authority was granted, seven years ago, to extend probational leave of 
absence to patients, very salutary results have followed the practice. Of the 92 
patients granted such leave during the past twelve months, 46, or -50 per cent., 
were sabsequeutly discharged as recovered, 17 as improved, 17 were returned to 
the Asylum in an unimproved state, 1 was discharged unimproved, and in the case 
of 11 the probational leave had not expired at the close of the year. 



Deaths. 

The following table exhibits the deaths which occurred in the Asylums uuring 
the year, to which is added, for the purposes of comparison, the statistics, under 
this head, of the preceding twelve months : — 



? 





1878-9. 


1877-8. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


A«ylum for the Insane, Toronto . 


22 


8 


30 


33 


14 


47 


Asylum for the Insane, London 


23 


20 


43 


20 


22 


42 


Asylum for the Insane, Kingston 

•'■"it,'" --^f^ 

Asylum for the Insane, Hamilton 


9 
9 


U 
7 


23 
16 


! 8 
3 


10 
4 


18 

7 


Asylum for Idiots, Orillia 


9 


3 


12 


11 


' 


16 




72 


52 


124 


75 


55 


130 



The rate of Asylum mortality for the past year is the lowest reported for 

14 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



several years, being only equal to 4.65 per cent, of the gross Asylum population. 
In 1877-78 the mortality was 5.10 per cent, and in the year preceding that it was 
5.72. 

A further examination of the figures in the foregoing table shews that the 
death rate varied a good deal in the respective Asylums. At Toronto it was 3.84 per 
per cent., at London 4.91, at Kingston 4.83, at Hamilton 4.38, and at Orillia 7.10 
per cent. 

The causes of death are detailed in table No. 10. Phthisis as usual stands 
first on the list, having been the cause of 21 deaths, Diarrhoea 12, General Paresis 
11, Senile Decay 9, etc. 

Table No. 9 gives the period of Asylum residence of those patients who 
died during the year. It will be observed that two had been in residence between 
15 and 20 years, two from 10 to 15 years, one 9 years, seven from 8 to 9 years, 
etc. 

Only one suicide took place during the year. Full particulars are given of it 
in the separate report upon the Toronto Asylum. 

Escapes. 

The escapes from the Asylums during the year numbered 37. Of these persons, 
28 were brought back to the Asylum ; some in a few hours and others in a few 
days, 3 were reported to have found their way home, and were retained there, and 
discharged from the Asylums at the request of their friends, and six, not having 
been heard of, were also written oft' the Asylum registers. 

The operations of the respective Asylums in respect to admissions, discharges 
and the general movements of patients, together with other statistical information, 
are exhibited in a concise form in the following summaries. 

Asylum for the Insane, Toronto. 

The patients remaining in this Asylum on the 30th September, 1878, num- 
bered 678 — 347 men and 331 women ; and during the past year 63 men and 39 
women were admitted (24 by the warrants of the Lieutenant Governor and 78 by 
medical certificates), making the aggregate number under treatment during the 
twelve months 780, as compared with 860 in the preceding year. This very con- 
siderable decrease in the number of patients under treatment, was due to the want 
of vacancies during a large portion of the year, thereby causing a reduction in 
the admissions from 189 in 1878 to 102 in 1879. The discharges numbered 70, 
of whom 34 were sent away cured, 27 in an improved and 9 in an unimproved 
sitate. The actual recoveries were therefore equal to 33.33 per cent, of the admis- 
sions of the year, but if applied to the entire population, only 4.35 per cent. The 
cures of the preceding year were in the proportion of 37. 50 per cent, on the admis- 
sions, and 8.12 per cent, on the total population. The unfavourable contrast 
brought out in these figures is simply due to the i educed number of admissions, 
consequent upon the want of vacancies, and the constantly increasing residuum 
of chronic patients. Out of the 674 patients in residence on the 30th September, 
646 were reported to be incurable. 

The discharges by death numbered 30, shewing that the rate of mortality 
was exceptionally low, being only equal to 3.84 per cent, of the population. Two 
patients escaped and four were transferred to other Asylums. During the year, 16 
patients were granted probational leave, and I have the following report respect- 
ing them, viz., 7 recovered and remained at home, 6 were so improved as to 

15 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



warrant their discharge, 1 le turned to the Asylum unimpi'oved, 1 was discharged 
unimproved, and 1 was still absent at the close of the year. 

Deducting the discharges, deaths, escapes and ti-ansfers from the total number 
under treatment, there remained in residence on the 30th September, 1879, 674 
patients. 

The greatest number of patients under treatment on a given day was 685 on 
the 27th February, and the lowest number was 666 on the 31st December, 1878, the 
daily average of the year being 676.61. The aggregate residence of the entire popu- 
lation during the twelve months was 246.966 days, or a fraction over 316 days 
per patient. 

The returns made to ine shew that of the 102 patients admitted, no less than 
40 were from the City of Toronto and County of York. 

The entire operations of the Asylum since its opening, are represented by 
5,221 admissions which were disposed of as follows : — 2,758 were discharged 
cured, improved and unimproved, 1,181 died, 61 escaped and 547 were transferred 
to other Asylums, leaving 674, as before stated, in the Asylum at the close of the 
year. 

Asylum for the Insane, London. 

At the close of the preceding year there remained in this Asylum 707 patients 
— 351 males and 356 females, — and 168 patients — 80 men and 88 women — were 
admitted during the past twelve months, making the aggregate population under 
treatment during that time 875. Of this number 48 men and 40 women were 
discharged, 43 died, 2 escaped, leaving §58 men and 384 women, or a total popu- 
lation of 742, in the Asylum at the close of the year. 

The returns shew that 79 of the admissions to the Asylum were persons tra.ns- 
ferred from Gaols under the warrant of the Lieutenant-Governor, and that the 
remaining 89 were admitted from private families, under medical certificates. Of 
the 168 ))ersons thus admitted, 33 were received from the County of Middlesex 
and City of London, 14 from the County of Oxford, 18 from Kent, 12 from Perth, 
11 from Huron, 8 from Lambton, 9 from Elgin, 9 from Brant, 7 from Essex, and 
the rest from other Counties of the Province. 

Respecting the discharges, 64 patients are reported to have been sent away 
cured, 16 improved and 8 unimproved. The ratio of the recoveries to the ad- 
missions of the year is therefore 38.10 per cent., and to the entire population 7.31 
per cent., as compared with 25.75 and 5.75 respectively during the preceding year. 
Sixty patients were discharged on probation, respecting whom the following report 
is furnished by the Medical Superintendent: — Finally discharged as cured 31, as 
improved 9, returned to the Asylum 15, remaining on probation at the close of 
the year 5. 

The deaths in the Asylum during the year numbered 43, shewing the rate 
of mortality to have been 4.91 per cent, on the entire population, as against 5.38 
per cent, in the previous year. 

On the 1st September, the patients in residence numbered 747, which was the 
largest population during the year, the smallest being on the 31st October 1878, 
when there were 698 patients in the Asylum. The average daily number in 
residence was 722.36. The collective stay in the Asylum of the entire population 
was in the aggregate 263.663 days, being an average of 301 days per patient. 

Since the opening of this Asylum on the 18th November 1870, up to the 
close of the official year under report, there have been admitted to it by warrant, 
medical certificate and transfer, 1621 persons, of whom 502 have been discharged, 
305 have died, 22 have escaped, 50 have been transferred to other Asylums, leav- 
ing 742 in residence at the close of the year. 

16 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



Asylum for the Insane, Kingston. 

The residents of this Asylum on the 30th September, 1878, numbered 210 
men and 208 women, or a total of 418, and 22 men and 36 women were admitted 
during the year, making a gross population in that time of 476. Thirty patients 
were discharged and 23 died, leaving 423 under accommodation on the 30th 
September, 1879. 

Dilienng from all the other Asylum districts of the Province, only 8 persons 
were admitted from the county and city in which the Asylum is situated, the 
remainder of the 58 admissions being pretty evenly distributed throughout the 
Eastern District, the greatest number of patients having been received from the 
County of Carleton. 

Of the patients discharged, 25 left the institution cured, 3 in an improved 
and 2 in an unimproved condition. These figures shew that the ratio of recoveries 
to the admissions was 43 per cent, and 5.25 per cent, to the entire number under 
treatment. 

Ten patients were sent out on probation, of whom 5 were subsequently dis- 
charged recovered, 1 as improved, 1 was returned, and in the cases of 3, the period 
of probation had not expired at the close of the year. 

The greatest number of patients in residence at one time was 426 on the 29th 
July, and the smallest number 410 on the 16th March. The average daily popu- 
lation was 418.52. The collective days' stay of all the patients during the year 
was 152,769 days, being an average of 320 days per patient. 

Asylum for tfie Insane, Hamilton. 

On the 30th September, 1878, there were in this Asylum 201 patients — 82 
men and 119 women — and during the year there were admitted 91 males and 73 
females, making a total population of 365. Of this number 16 were discharged, 
16 died, and 2 escaped, leaving 331 patients in residence on the SOth September, 
1879, of whom 152 were males and 179 females. The changes in the Asylum 
population were few until the new wings were opened on the 15th March, but 
from that date to the close of the year, the admissions were very numerous. They 
were still further increased when two wards in the new wings were set apart for 
the reception of idiots. The number of lunatics admitted was 70 men and 67 
women, in all 137, and the number of idiots, was 21 males and 6 females. A large 
proportion of both classes of inmates came from counties outside of the South- 
western Division, which is attached to the Hamilton Asylum. The County of 
York and City of Toronto, in addition to furnishing nearly half the admissions 
to the Toronto Asylum, sent 33 patients this As3dum. The County of Wentworth 
and City of Hamilton sent 18, and the remaining Counties of the South Western 
Division sent 54 patients. Of the 164 admissions of the year, 97 were under the 
warrant of the Lieutenant-Governor and the remaining 67 under medical 
certificates. 

Of the 16 patients discharged, 12 were sent away cured, 1 improved and 3 
unimproved. In addition, 2 escaped and their names were taken off" the roll. 
These figures shew that the recoveries were in the ratio of 8.75 })er cent, to the 
admissions of the year, and 3.55 per cent, to the entire population. The idiots 
admitted and in residence are, of course, excluded from both calculations. The 
few recoveries are due to the fact that up to March last, the Asylum was exclu- 
sively occupied by chronic patients, and was only then constituted a general 
receiving Asylum. 

The ratio of mortality, represented by 16 deaths, was equal to 4.38 per cent, 
of the year's population. 

2 17 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



On the 27th September the greatest number of patients was in the Asylum, 
viz., 308, and on the 13th November, 1878, the lowest, viz., 200. The average 
daily population was 242. 

The collective stay of all the patients during the year equalled 88,458 days, 
or an average of 242 days to each patient. 

The entire operations of the Hamilton Asylum since its opening comprise 401 
admissions and transfers, 20 dischai-ges, 40 deaths, 7 escapes and 3 re-trarisfers, 
leaving 331 in residence at the close of the year now being reported upon. 

Asylum for Idiots, Orillia. 

Owing to the crowded state of this Asylum at the end of last year, the ad- 
missions in the subsequent twelve months were very few. The movements of the 
inmates during that period were as follows : Remaining in residence on 30th Sep- 
tember, 1878, 75 males and 71 females, in all 146 ; admitted during year 14 males 
and 9 females, making the total population 169. Of these 2 were taken home by 
their parents, and 12 died, leaving 155 idiots (78 males, 77 females) in the Asylum 
at the close of the year. 

The occupation of every bed in this Asylum, and the custody in the Common 
Gaols of a considerable number of urgent cases of idiocy, rendered it necessary to 
set apart two of the wards of the Hamilton Asylum for the reception of idiots. 
This was done early in the month of July, and since that time the admissions to 
the Orillia Asylum have been confined to the reception of children, to till up vacan- 
cies caused by deaths or removals. The placiog of two young children in some 
of the beds, enabled the population to be increased by 9. 

Twelve deaths occurred during the year, making the death-rate equal to a 
little over 7 per cent, of the population, as compared with 9.75 in the preceding 
year. 

The greatest number of residents on any day was 157 on the 11th September, 
1879, and the lowest 143 on the 28th October, 1878, the daily average of the year 
being 149.18. The collective period of residence of all the inmates equalled 54,456 
days, or an individual average of 322 days. 

Since this Asylum was opened on the 25th September, 1876, 215 idiots have 
been received into it. Of these 10 were returned to their homes, 50 have died, and 
155 remained in the Asylum at the close of the year. 

Causes of Insanity. 

Included in the usual statistical tables at the end of this portion of the report, 
will be found (No. 12) the returns as received from the various Medical Superin- 
tendents, of the assigned causes of insanity, in relation to the admissions of the 
year. I submit hereunder, in a condensed form, a recapitulation of these returns, viz : 

Moral Causes. 

Malej Female. Total. 

Domestic troubles, including loss of relatives or 

friends 7 

Religious excitement 13 

Adverse circumstances,includingbusine8s troubles 19 

Love affairs, including seduction 3 

Mental anxiety, " worry " 12 

Fright and nervous shocks 8 

18 



8 


21 


8 


27 


4 


7 


6 


17 


9 


12 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



Physical Causes. 

Male. Female. Total. 

Intemperance in drink 18 2 20 

Intemperance, sexual 

Venereal disease 

Self-abuse, sexual 33 6 39 

Over- work 5 2 7 

Sunstroke 8 8 

Accident or injury 10 4 14 

Pregnancy 6 6 

Puerperal 11 11 

Lactation 8 3 

Puberty and change of life 2 2 

Uterine disorders 5 5 

Brain disease, with general paralysis 6 1 7 

Brain disease, with epilepsy 8 8 16 

Other forms of brain disease 2 7 9 

Other bodily diseases or disorders, including old 

age 7 12 19 

Fevers 1 1 2 

Hereditary. 

With other ascertained cause in combination . . 21 35 56 

With other combined cause not ascertained .... 2© 40 65 

Congenital. 

With other ascertained cause in combination . . 2 2 

With other combined cause not ascertained .... 5 2 7 

Unknown 135 149 284 

Employment of Patients. 

From returns made to this office it would appear that about one-third of 
theA.sylum populations are employed about the Institutions some way or another. 
Some of the patients classed as workers are, without doubt, only nominally so, and 
it is also true that the volume of work performed, is not at all equal to what the 
same numerical force would accomplish in the outside world. Asylum labour, 
however, should be judged by no such standard, but only by a comparison of re- 
sults with Asylums in this and other countries. 

It is quite evident that increased attention is being paid in our own Asylums 
to this important matter, but I am convinced that a gi-eat deal more has yet to be 
done in organizing and methodically carrying on Asylum employment, and also in 
largely increasing the number employed, before it will take its proper place, along 
with healthful recreation and amusement, as the most important and effective factor 
in the treatment, with a view to the cure, of mental disease. I say, together with 
recreation and amusement, as these factors in the treatment of the insane should 
go hand in hand. Given a perfect system of employment, recreation and amuse- 
ment, combined with continuous and close observation of individual cases, a proper 
ward classification of the patients, sound hygienic treatment, and what more can 
be done to restore mental sanity ? But if the more important of these agents, in 
the curative treatment of the insane, be withheld or neglected, then it appears to me 
that an Asylum, so far from performing its functions as a curative establishment, 

19 



43 Victoria Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



must prove a failure, and degenerate into a mere house of refuge, or place for 
restraining tbe dangerous proclivities of the insane. 

As compared with the Asylums of the United States, my observation and ex- 
perience lead nie to the conclusion that Ontario is in advance of that country, in 
providing employment for her insane. From a perusal of the reports of the Insti- 
tutions in Great Britian, I conceive that while we may not yet have come up to 
the standard of employment in the Scotch Asylums, which appears to be the highest, 
we are considerably above that of the English. 

In passing through the wards of an Asylum, one cannot but be struck with the 
number of patients therein, who are not so much physically incapacitated for hard 
out-door labour, but who, from having led a sedentary life, are physically unfitted 
for it. For such it is most important that some light employment of a cheerful 
and recreative character, should be j)rovided. Little or no exertion is required on 
the part of Asylum officials to get some of the patients to engage in work, and, 
indeed, the overwillingness of a few is so great as to require restraint. The efforts 
and ingenuity of the Asylum staff should, therefore, be more closely directed to 
that large portion of the insane, who prefer to lounge about the wards in a state of 
listlessness. To implant and cultivate in that class of patients a taste for work, so 
that they might, as it were, be lifted out of themselves and their often self-imposed 
melancholy surroundings, is, it appears to me, the great task in which the energies 
of the Superintendent and staff should be strenuously engaged, and which is of infi- 
nitely greater importance, than any other portion of Asylum work and supervision. 

Farming and gardening work is undoubtedly the most healthy employment, 
and is, at the same time, best suited to the inclinations of the largest proportion 
of the patients. Not only is it suitable and healthful, but it affords a greater de- 
gree of personal liberty to the patients than any other employment, and in addi- 
tion, is the simplest and most profitable, both of which are elements of the utmost 
importance. 

Although the area of land attached to the various Asylums has been con- 
siderably increased in the last few years, it is still insufficient. Attached to the 
Toronto Asylum there are 145 acres; London Asylum, 300 acres; Kingston Asylum, 
114 acres; Hamilton Asylum, 93 acres, and Orillia Asylum only 11 acres. With 
the exception of London, the quantity of land per patient is much too little, and 
even there an additional 200 acres should be obtained before the farm land in the 
neighbourhood increases in value. When the 300 acres were originally purchased, 
it was expected that the capacity of the Asylum would not be more than 500 
patients, but with the extension of the cottage system and the erection of a 
separate building for refractory patients, the capacity is now increased to 907 
beds, thus making the land area only equal to one-third of an acre per patient. The 
extent of the 'arming land atTorontois being more curtailed each year, by its appro- 
priation for other public institutions, sales for railway purposes, etc., and the great 
increase in the value of the land immediately surrounding the Asylum, will - 
doubtle.'^s in a short time tend to entirely divest the institution of the 150 acres, 
which were purchased in 1870 from the Ordnance Department. This is much to 
be regretted, as it must in time seriously affect the beneficial results of the Asylum, 
as a curative institution. The acquirement from the Corporation of Toronto of 23 
acres of the old Exhibition land, immediately adjoining the south walls of the 
Asylum, in exchange for other Government land more remote therefrom, has added 
a piece of land to the Asylum property which will be of great value for garden- 
ing purposes, but it is clear that the day is not far distant when the Asylumi will 
have to be abandoned, and a new Institution erected upon a property of not less 
than 500 acres. The sale of the present property would in time provide a fund 
almost sufficient to erect new buildings. 

20 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



During the past year two properties, comprising 83 acres, have been pur- 
chased and attached to the Kingston Asylum, which now has in all 114 acres. 
Some time ago, I urgently recommended the acquisition of a plot of Ordnance 
land to the west of the Asylum, containing about 75 acres. I would again urge 
the purchase of this property, in order that the area of land may be increased 
before it is too late. 

As the Hamilton Asylum was originally intended for an Hospital for Inebri- 
tes, it was thought that 93 acres would be sufficient to attach to such an establish- 
ment, but now, that it has been converted into an Asylum for the Insane and 
its capacity increased from 200 to 532 beds, it is very important that 100 acres 
more should be added. 

In the early part of 1878, a few acres were acquired for the Orillia Asylum, 
but only 11 acres are attached to this Asylum in all ; a quantity so utterly insuffi- 
cient that more should at once be obtained. 

I would earnestly press upon the Government and Legislature, the acquire- 
ment of the additional land as recommended. No better investment could be 
made by the Province of the few thousand dollars required for this purpose from 
the surplus millions in the Treasury, as the land must constantly increase in value. 
In proof of this, I may cite the purchase in 1870 of the lands before referred to for 
the Toronto Asylum for $150 per acre, and which would now readily sell for over 
$2,000 per acre, representing a clear gain to the Province of over $250,000. 

Apart altogether from the great value of land cultivation and out-door work 
in the treatment of a large majority of the insane, the products derived therefrom 
very materially reduce the cost of maintaining Asylums. From the returns of the 
past year, which will be found in the appendices to the reports of the Medical 
Superintendents, it will be seen that the value of these products computed at cur- 
rent market rates, aggregated no less a sum than $32,490,62. The following is a 
summary of these returns, viz : — 

Asylum for the Insane, Toronto $12,571 33 

Asylum for the Insane, London 14,099 SO 

Asylum for the Insane, Kingston 3,831 69 

Asylum for the Insane, Hamilton 1,151 90 

Asylum for Idiots, Orillia 836 40 



$32,490 62 



It is clear therefore from the stand-point of public economy, and leaving out 
of the question the beneficial and healthful results accruing to the insane from land 
cultivation, that as large an area of land should be attached to Asylums as can be 
profitably worked. 

Table No. 17 shews the nature of the work done by the patients in the various 
Asylums, and the number of days they were employed. 

Amusement and Recreation, 

From the various reports made to me, as well as from my own observation, 
it is apparent that increased efforts are being made in all our Asylums to provide 
amusement and recreation for the patients. The Medical Superintendent of the 
Toronto Asylum, reports that twenty-five concerts were given during last year, 
chiefly in the winter, by the choirs of the various City churches, in addition to 
four dramatic entertainments and four others of a musical character, and that 
there was also a dance every Friday evening, during the winter months. Besides 

21 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



these winter entertainments, there were several pic-nics during the summer, when 
dancing and croquet were extensively indulged in. One hundred of the patients 
also visited the Industrial Exhibition. 

The Medical Superintendent of the London Asylum reports that the pro- 
gramme of amusements was somewhat interrupted by the supposed unsafeness of 
the amusement hall, which was afterwards found to be quite secure, and by their 
being short of one member of the medical staff. The Superintendent, however, 
states that in addition to the weekly dances, twelve musical, theatrical and panto- 
mimic entertainments were given, as well as occasional concerts by the Asylum 
band. It is much to be regretted tha.t the amusements in this Asylum were, for 
the reasons above stated, curtailed, and it is to be hoped they will be both extended 
and improved upon during the current year. 

The Medical Superintendent of the Kingston Asylum says that amusements 
are much appreciated by the patients during the long winter months, and that in 
addition to the usual dances and such other amusements as were at their disposal, 
the patients enjoyed four concerts given by some of the church choirs of the City, 
and three entertainments by professionals and amateurs. Some of the patients 
also visited the local Agricultural Show. 

I learn from the Medical Superintendent of the Hamilton Asylum that several 
readings and concerts were given during the winter and were highly appreciated 
by the inmates. 

The Medical Superintendent of the Orillia Asylum states that at Christmas 
time they had their usual holiday entertainments with christmas tree, magic lantern, 
etc., the latter being repeated several times during the winter. They had also 
three concerts during; the summer, and recreation in the grounds. 

It will not be denied that the foregoing furnishes a fairly satisfactory pro- 
gramme of amusements, but there are still many things lacking. Out-door sports 
should be more encouraged and indulged in by the patients during the summer ; 
cricket, ball, skittles, quoits, racing, etc., for the men, frequent pic-nics, occasional 
drives and other out-door amusements for the men and women together. 

I fear that as a general rule, the patients are sent to bed much too early, 
both in summer and winter, a practice which, in view of the reports of the Medi- 
cal Superintendents of the prevalence of certain debasing habits, cannot but have 
a bad effect. 

The importance of these matters in connection with Asylum management 
and routine cannot well be overrated. 

Officers, Attendajs'ts and Servants. 

Table No. 16 exhibits the number of officers, attendants and servants on the 
pay list of each of the Asylums, as follows, Toronto, 95 ; London, 111 ; Kingston, 
53 ; Hamilton, 44 ; Orillia, 28, or a total of 331. 

There have only been a few changes in the staffs during the year. Through 
the resignation of Dr. Dickson, owdng to ill health. Dr. Metcalf, the Assistant 
Superintendent of the London Asylum, was promoted to the Superintendency of 
the Kingston Asylum. The practice of utililizing at the Toronto Asylum, the 
services of clinical students, who, in such capacity, resided in the Asylum, and re- 
ceived a small annual allowance, has been discontinued. The Medical Staff of that 
Asylum now^ consists of the Medical Superintendent, Assistant Physician, and 
Second Assistant Physician. Dr. C. K. Clarke, formerly senior clinical student, was 
on obtaining his degree of Doctor of Medicine, appointed to the position of Second 
Assistant Physician. 

Owing to the transfer of Dr. Metcalf to the Kingston Asylum, Dr. T. J. W. 
Burgess has been promoted from the position of First Assistant Physician to that 

22 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



of Assistant Superintendent of the London Asylum, and Dr. N. H. Beemer, who was 
formerly Second Assistant Physician, has been appointed First Assistant Physician, 
with charge of the Refractory Wards. Dr. J. W. Brown was a[)pointed to the 
vacant junior position on the medical staff, and on his resigning on the olst 
March, Dr. T. Milman was appointed to the vacancy. 

There have been no changes in the medical staffs at the Hamilton and 
Orillia Asylums, but owing to the large increase in the population of the first 
named Asylum, it was found necessary to appoint a steward and storekeeper. 

The connection of the Toronto Asylum with the city water supply, has 
enabled us to dispense with the services of the assistant engineer and stoker at 
that institution. 

Asylum Expenditures. 

A detailed statement of Asylum expenditures during the year ending 30th 
September, 1879, is given in Table No. 13 attached to this section of the Report, of 
which the following statement is a summary : — 

Asylum for the Insane, Toronto $83,725 22 

Asylum for the Insane, London 95,681 74 

Asylum for the Insane, Kingston 51,345 85 

Asylum for the Insane, Hamilton 37,186 42 

Asylum for Idiots, Orillia 18,955 14 

$286,894 37 

The Asylum expenditures in the preceding year, with a daily average popula- 
tion of 2066.44, were $270,162.95, shewing the annual cost per patient to have 
been $130.78. During the year now under report, the cost of the Asylums as 
shewn in the foregoing table, amounted to $286,894.37, and as the daily average 
population was 2,208.67, the annual cost per patient was $129.01. 

The receipts from paying patients and other Asylum revenues amounted to 
$32,898.26, which, if deducted from the gross expenditures, would leave the net 
cost to the Province for Asylum maintenance $253,996.11. 

Table No. 14 exhibits the amount expended in each Asylum under the respec- 
tive headings of medecines ; beer, wine and spirits ; butchers' meat; flour; butter; 
milk ; groceries ; vegetables ; bedding and clothing ; fuel ; light ; laundry ; furni- 
ture ; farm and grounds; repairs; printing and stationery; water; salaries and 
wages ; and miscellaneous expenditures. The same statement further exhibits the 
cost per patient for each of these services, and also the total annual cost per 
patient in the different Asylums. 

A summary of the annual and weekV cost per patient is appended, viz. : — 

Annual cost per Weekly cost per 
patient. patient. 

Asylum for the Insane, Toronto $123 74 $2 37 

Asylum for the Insane, London 132 52 2 54 

Asylum for the Insane, Kingston 122 69 2 35 

Asylum for the Insane, Hamilton 153 66 2 95 

Asylum for Idiots, Orillia 127 21 2 44 

It is but proper to state that included in the expenditures of the Hamilton 
Asylum is the coal for the previous year, the supply not having been delivered in 
time for inclusion with the year's accounts. Deducting this, the annual cost per 
patient in Hamilton would be $140.69, and the weekly $2.70. 

23 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



The annual and weekly costs per patient in the preceding year in the respec- 
tive Asylums were as follows : — 

Annual cost per Weekly cost per 
patient. patient . 

Asylum for the Insane, Toronto Si 2 2 71 $2 36 

Asylum for the Insane, London 134 14 2 57 

Asylum for the Insane, Kingston 120 90 2 32 

Asylum for the Insane, Hamilton 162 80 8 13 

Asylum for Idiots, Orillia 136 07 2 61 

It wiU be observed from the foregoing figures that the weekly cost of main- 
tenance, as compared with that of the preceding year, has advanced a trifle at the 
Toronto and Kingston Asylums, while a large reduction has taken place at Hamil- 
ton and a small one at London and Orillia. Now that the population of the 
Hamilton Asylum is increasing, without a corresponding advance being made in 
the salaries and wages expenditures, I look for a speedy equalization of the cost 
per patient in that Asylum, with what it is in Toronto and Kingston. 

A comparison of the expenditures of the respective Asylums, as exhibited 
in Table No. 14, shews that there are still some rather marked differences in 
some branches of the expenditures. They are, however, not so great as in former 
years, and the explanations made in last year's report as to the causes, wUl in the 
main apply to the figures of the present year. 

The use of beer, wine and spirits is now almost abandoned in all the Asylums 
of the Province, with the exception of Toronto. It will be noticed that the 
annual cost per patient for these supplies during the year, was S2.14 at Toronto, 
20 cents at London, nothing at Kingston, 49 cents at Hamilton, and nothing at 
Orillia. The cost per patient for medicine was highest at the London Asylum, 
being $1.08, as compared with 75 cents at Toronto, 82 cents at Kingston, 69 cents 
at Hamilton and 52 cents at Orillia. 

The annual cost per patient for butchers' meat, fish, etc., is singularly uniform 
in the thrc^ largest Asylums, viz.: $16.70 at Toronto, $16.67 at London, and 
$16.50 at Kingston. The cost of these articles shews a great falling oflf at Ham- 
ilton, as compared with the previous year, viz., from $21.14 to $12.63 per patient, 
being lower than in any other Asylum. This is chiefly owing to the reduction in 
the contract price from $6.90 to $5 per 100 lbs., and also to greater care and super- 
vision on the part of the storekeeper. At Orillia the annual cost per inmate under 
this head, was $12.68, 

Flour was obtained at a cheaper rate than in the previous year, and as a con- 
sequence, there is a considerable reduction in the cost of bread in all the Asylums. 

Butter was also contracted for at a lower rate, and therefore a corresponding 
reduction is shewn in that item. 

The cost of groceries is apparently higher at Toronto than elsewhere, but that 
is owing to the fact that a larger stock of tea and other articles had been laid in 
there than in the other Asylums. 

As explained in last year's report the cost of clothing varies according to the 
number of patients clothed by their friends. There being a greater number of 
that class in the Toronto Asylum than in the London, the cost of clothing is lower 
in the former place. 

In the four Asylums in which gas is used, namely Toronto, London, 
Hamilton and Orillia, there are very marked differences in the per capita cost 
of that supply, viz., at Toronto $2.92, London $4, Hamilton $4.69 and at Orillia 
$L90 per patient. At the latter place gas is made on the premises, and had the 
Institution the same population as the Hamilton Asylum, the cost, instead of being 
$1..90 per patient per annum, would not exceed $1.00. The London Gas Company 

24 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



have notified their customers of a large reduction in the rates to take effect at once, 
but at Hamilton, the Company continue to charge the excessively high rate of 
$2.25 per thousand feet. Should a reduction not be made during the coming year, 
I would recommend the erection of gas works on the premises. 

The yearly cost per patient for salaries and wages was, at Toronto $35.08, at 
London $.36.89, at Kingston $4-0.31, at Hamilton $45.82 and at Orillia $54.84. 
The excess in Kingston is owing to the high rate of wages paid by the Dominion 
Government to many of the male attendants, which was originally made the same 
as that paid to guards in the Penitentiary, and on taking over the Asylum the 
Province had to continue it. However, all new attendants, on entering the service 
of that Asylum, now receive the same rate of wages as is paid in the Toronto 
and other Asylums. The cost of wages has been reduced at the Hamilton Asylum 
from $51.11 per patient to $45.82, and a still greater reduction will take place next 
year. 

Asylum Receipts and Paying Patients. 

The following summary shews the number of patients on the paying list in 
each Asylum, as well as the total amount received, with which is included the small 
revenue derived from other sources, such as the sale of kitchen refuse, etc. 

Asylum for the Insane, Toronto 200 patients $23,409 05 

Asylum for the Insane, London 91 " 5,740 93 

Asylum for the Insane, Kingston 15 " 1,733 10 

Asylum for the Insane, Hamilton .... 16 " 1,011 10 

Asylum for Idiots, Orillia 21 " 1,004 08 



343 



$32,898 26 



As compared with the previous year, these receipts shew a slight reduction, 
owing to the fact that a larger amount of arrears were paid during that period. 

The weekly rates of payment for maintenance from which the above sums 
were received, were as follows : — 



76 


patients paid 


from 


31 




( 


48 




( 


3 




( 


16 




( 



1 


to $2 per 


week 


2 


to 


3 




3 


to 


4 




4 


to 


5 




5 


to 


6 




6 


to 


7 





343 

The summary given below shews th« receipts for patients' maintenance since 
Confederation. 



Collected 
Collected 
Collected 
Collected 
Collected 
Collected 
Collected 
Collected 
Collected 
Collected 
Collected 



during 
during 
during 
during 
during 
during 
during 
during 
during 
during 
durintf 



the year 
the year 
the year 
the year 
the year 
the year 
the year 
the year 
the year 
the year 
the year 



ending 30th September, 1869 
ending 30th September, 1870. 
ending 30th September, 1871 
ending 30th September, 1872. 
ending 30th September, 1873, 
ending .30th September, 1874. 
ending 30th September, 1875'. 
ending 30th September, 1876. 
ending 30th September, 1877. 
ending 30th September, 1878. 
ending 30th September, 1879 . 

25 



$5,866 75 
8,764 32 
14,045 30 
19,255 80 
16,660 61 
20,035 77 
21,875 92 
21,175 93 
28,093 58 
36,103 75 
32,898 26 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



Supplies. 

Table No. 15, appended to this division of the report, furnishes information 
respecting the prices paid under contract for Asylum supplies. The following 
statement shews the extent of Asylum purchases, and the amount expended under 
contract and by purchase in the open m&rket : — 

1. Goods and supplies bought under the contract system. $104,327 70 

2. Services for which tenders could not be asked, such as 

Water, Gas, Repairs, Amusements, Stationery, 

&c., &c 40,154 85 

3. Dry-Goods, Groceries and Supplies purchased in open 

market 55,898 97 

4. Salaries and Wages 86,512 85 

^ 8286,894 37 



Asylum tor the Insane, Toronto. 

Description op thb Building as Furnished by the Architect of thb Public 

Works Department. 

The main building was erected according to the designs and under the superintendence 
of J. G. Howard, Esq., Architect, Toronto. 

It was commenced in 1845 and occupied in 1850. 

The site, consisting of 50 acres of land, was granted by Her Majesty's Board of Ord- 
nance, and is nearly the western city boundary, about three miles from the City Hall. 

The material is of white brick, with cut stone dressings, from the Thorold quarries, 
and th« buildings are roofed with slate. 

The total length of the building is 584 feet, including the circular verandahs at the 
end of each wing, 50 feet in diameter. 

The main building is four storeys in height, averaging 11| feet each, the upper storey 
being about ten feet. The centre building, 120 feet in front, five storeys in height, and 
about 90 feet in depth, is surmounted by a handsome dome, 40 feet in diameter, the ex- 
treme height being about 120 feet from the surface. 

The wings extending east and west from the centre building are nearly 210 feet in 
length each, not including the verandahs, the width of each wing being about 60 feet, and 
45 feet in height from the surface. 

The basement storey, sunk 4 feet below the surface, contains the kitchens, store 
rooms, dining rooms for the attendants and working patients, Bursar's ofiice, dormitories 
for patients, and vaulted rooms with flagging for hot water boilers and furnaces of heat- 
ing apparatus, which consist of brick furnaces, 5 feet square and 4 feet in height, 17 in 
number, enclosing coils of iron pipe one inch in diameter, through which the water circu- 
lates to the several apartments, about 1,200 feet of pipe being connected with each 
furnace. 

The corridors throughout are 14 feet in width, lighted by windows in the rear, and 
at each end by the circular verandahs before mentioned. 

The centre building contains apartments for the Assistant Physicians and Matron ; 
Surgery, Superintendent's office, waiting rooms, chapel, recreation room and dormitories 
for female attendants. 

The wings above the basement, three storeys in height, are occupied by the patients, 
about 200 for each wing, and attendants' apartments. The single dormitories are 12 
feet by 10 feet, and associated dormitories 35 by 30, and 33 by 20 feet. Dining and sit- 
ting rooms, water closets, bath and wash rooms, lifts, dust and clothes shafts, are attached 
to each ward, with wide staircases. 

26 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



The recent additions, opened in 1870-1, consist of two wings, designed by the Architect 
of the Public Works Department, from sketches made by the Medical Superintendent, 
extending in a southerly direction from the extremities of the main building, forming 
with the latter three sides of a quadrangle, open to the south. 

The wings are 215 feet in length, 60 feet wide, and four storeys in height, 12 feet for 
each storey, and are connected with the main building by a covered passage 30 feet in 
length, 9 feet wide, and two storeys in height. The openings from the main building and 
wings to these passages are protected by iron doors in case of fire. 

The basements contain kitchens, sculleries, associated dormitories for working pa- 
tients, vaulted and flagged rooms for hot water boilers and furnaces for heating apparatus, 
18 in number, similar in construction to the main building, 1,200 feet of pipe to each 
furnace. 

The three upper storeys in each wing have corridors 12 feet in width, with rows of 
dormitories on each side, 12 feet by 6 feet, and four transverse recesses 10 feet wide, also 
apartments in the centre for Attendants' rooms, water closets, bath and wash rooms. An 
associated dormitory, 21 feet square, and sitting-room, are placed at the southern end, 
also a dining-room at the northern end of each wing, 30 feet by 21 feet, with lifts from 
the kitchen. 

The verandahs at the southern ends of each wing are 30 feet by 20 feet, of a quad- 
rangular form, supported by iron pillars and protected by iron bars for each of the storeys. 

The site of 50 acres is enclosed by a brick wall, 10 feet in height, with an iron rail- 
ing in front of the main building on the north side, and neat brick entrance lodges and 
gates. 

Two Hospitals, 60 feet in length by 35 feet in width, with rear additions 27 feet by 
22 feet, three storeys in height, were erected at the same time as the wings (1870-1), east 
and west of the same, 200 feet distant, and afford accommodation for about 30 patients 
each, in associated dormitories. There are also attendants rooms, kitchens, bath and 
wash rooms and water-closets, hot water furnaces, etc., to each Hospital. 

In 1870, about 150 acres of land, south and west of the Asylum grounds, were pur- 
chased from the Dominion Government, for farming purposes. Farm buildings, con- 
sisting of a farmer's house, barn, stables and waggon-house were erected on the same, near 
the western city boundary. 

During this year portions of this land west of the Asylum, along Queen and Dufferin 
streets, were exchanged with the City Council for about 20 acres south of the Asylum 
grounds, extending to King street, which was opened westward in 1876. 

In 1877 a separate residence for the Medical Superintendent was erected near the 
eastern lodge, with a private entrance on Queen street. 

The water for the Asylum was pumped from Lake Ontario until 1877, when arrange- 
ments Avere made with the City Council for the supply from the City water works. 

The buildings are supplied with iron and wooden tanks, lined with lead, affording a 
total capacity of 50,000 gallons, for holding water, and there are 4 hydrants on the ground 
in case of fire. 

The laundry, 250 feet in rear of the main building, is 112 feet in length, by 52 feet 
in width, and two storeys in height, with flagged and conci-ete floors, the building being 
of white brick with stone dressings. 

Provision was made for a bakery and oven at the southern end of the laundry, and 
drying rooms on the second storey. 

There is a large iron fountain in front of the main building, with two smaller foun- 
tains in the rear, and the grounds were planted with choice trees and laid out with plank 
and gravel walks for the recreation of the patients. 

The out-buildings consist of stables, cow-houses, barn, waggon sheds, hen-houses, 
piggery, coal sheds, carpenter's shop, and shed for lumber adjoining the same. 

The dormitories and apartments are ventilated by means of tile pipes, 6 and 9 inches 
in diameter, built in the walls, one to each of the single apartments, and a proportionate 
number for associated dormitories, etc., leading into brick chambers in the attics, in which 
stoves were placed for heating the air and inducing currents through the galvanized iron 
ventilators on the roofs. 

27 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



The soil pipes of the water-closets are ventilated by means of galvanized iron pipes 
leading into the hot water boiler flues. 

The drains round and from the main building, wings and hospitals, farm buildings- 
and Medical Superintendent's residence, discharge into the main sewer, 3 feet by 2 feet, 
built of brick, which empties into Lake Ontario, about one mile distant. 

The Asylum affords accommodation for 670 patients, at a total cost of about $670,000. 

Minutes of Inspection of the Toronto Asylum Recorded during Year. 

On inspecting this Asylum on the 17th and 18th March, the population comprised 
352 men and 331 women, or a total of 683. At my previous inspection, on the 3Gth 
September, 1878, the numbers were 345 men and 328 women. The following are the 
changes which have occurred since the date of that visit, viz. : Admissions 68, discharges 
37, deaths 21, escaped 2, and, in addition, 2 patients were, on the application of their 
relatives and the payment of removal expenses, transferred to Hamilton Asylum. During 
the period named, 746 patients have been under treatment. 

Of the 68 admissions, 36 were paying patients at rates varying from two to six dollars 
per week. The whole number of that class of patients in the Asylum, at this visit, is 192, 
or nearly thirty per cent, of the entire population, and the receipts from such patients 
aggregate about $25,000 per annum, or nearly one-third of the gross cost of maintenance. 

Of the 37 discharges, 11 were cases of recurrent insanity, who have, during a series 
of years, been admitted and re-admitted from two to eight times. Six of this number 
were discharged recovered, 3 improved, and 2 were taken home by their friends in an 
unimproved condition. 

The condition of the patients is upon the whole very satisfactory. The rate of mor- 
tality has been very low, and very little sickness now prevails in the Asylum. 

The patients are very quiet, except in the female refractory ward. Not a single case 
of mechanical restraint exists, and in many of the wards there has been no recourse to re- 
straint or seclusion since my previous visit. 

The state of the Asylum in ail its departments is eminently satisfactory. Every part 
of the house is strictly clean ; the ventilation, judging from the absence of smells, is good, 
except in the vicinity of some of the closets ; and the wards, since they have been painted, 
are neat in their appearance and generally very cheerful looking. 

Authority having been given in the previous month to paint the walls of the single 
rooms in the superior wards and the dining rooms of the main Asylum, I find that a por- 
tion of the work has been done and the remainder is in progress. The cost is equal to 
6-r'(j cents per square yard. The Medical Superintendent is authorized to continue this 
work, at the most needed points, until the present stock of paint is exhausted. 

The dining-room arrangements and equipment in the superior wards have much im- 
proved, and the meals to the paying patients are now very neatly served. Some of the 
dining-rooms in the main building, require to be brightened up by paint and whitewash. 

I saw and tasted the dinners served in the various halls, during the Aasit, and found 
the food good and sufficient. The bread, the quality of which I complained of at my last 
inspection, has somewhat improved, but it is not yet as good as it should and must be. 

An appropriation of $1,250 having been voted by the Legislature for the purpose 
of improving and consolidating the kitchen arrangements of the east main building, east 
wing and east Hospital, in each of which there is now a distinct kitchen and cooking staff, 
the question of how best to accomplish that object was fully considered at this visit. The 
range cooking for the corresponding departments in the western buildings and which has 
been in operation for over two years, is giving very good satisfaction, but the serious draw- 
back to the system is that the soup-making, stewing and -vegetable boiling has still to be 
done in furnace boilers, necessitating the keeping up of three additional fires. The suc- 
cess which has attended steam cooking in all the Institutions where it has been tried, 
points to that as the best system to adopt. Moreover, the abandonmemt of the steam 
boilers for pumping the water supply from the bay, leaves these boilers at our disposal. 
The engineer will therefore proceed with the work of removing one of the boilers from the 
engine-house and placing it in the room adjoining the western kitchen. The connections, 

28 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



together with the requisite number of kettles, jacketed boilers, and other cooking appli- 
ances will at once be purchased. In order, however, that the engineer may fully inform 
himself as to the best method of placing and connecting these appliances, and their uses 
generally, the Medical Superintendent is authorized to send him to the Kingston Asylum, 
where the system of cooking by steam has long been in operation. 

The question of overcoming the defects in the heating arrangements of the old build- 
ing, was also fully considered at this inspection, and it was decided by way of trial to 
abandon the use of some of the furnace coils now used in heating the water, and to make 
direct connection with a hot water boiler. As the trial, however, involves the placing of 
additional coils in the wards where the test is to be made, and as expenditures for other 
appliances will have to be incurred, the work will have to remain in abeyance until an ap- 
propriation is granted to enable it to be gone on with. 

An appropi'iation having been voted for the reconstruction of the airing verandahs, 
the Honourable Commissioner of Public Works will be asked to have the work proceeded 
with as soon as possible. 

The negotiations for supplying city water to the Asylum having been successfully 
■completed some time ago, instructions were given to the Medical Superintendent to have 
the necessary connections made. This has been done, and the Institution is now being 
supplied with water for all purposes f i-om the city mains. 

A second inspection was made of the Asylum on th« 25th and 27th June. The follow- 
ing summary exhibits the movements of patients since my last visit on the 18th March : 
patients then in residence 683, since admitted 14 — 7 men and 7 women; total number 
under treatment, 697 ; discharged 11 ; died 3; leaving in the asylum at this visit 3-50 men 
and 333 women, or a total of 683. These figures shew that very few changes have been 
made in the Asylum population in the last three months. The falling oS in the number 
of admissions is attributable to three causes, the low death rate, the continued and full 
occupation of the beds, and the diminished number of discharges. Although the number of 
patients in residence is the same as at last visit, it exceeds the proper space limitation 
by about eight beds. The tendency to overcrowd is very great, owing to the pressure 
brought to gain admission to the Asylum for lunatics within the district allotted thereto. 
The Medical Superintendent will endeavour toe onfine admissions, as much as possible, to 
paying patients; promptly referring applicants for free admission to the Asylums at 
Hamilton and London, according to their railway proximity to these places, taking care to 
notify the Superintendents of those Asylums of the action taken. 

It is to be regretted that the Asylums designed to serve the central and eastern sec- 
tions of the Province should both be full at the same time, while there are so many vacant 
beds in the Asylums at Hamilton and London. It is hoped, however, that the difficulty 
will be partially overcome, without incurring the expense of transfers, by the Medical 
Superintendents of the Toronto and Kingston Asylums giving prompt directions to the 
friends of the insane, to transmit their applications to the Hamilton and London Asylums. 

That only three deaths should have occurred in one hundred days, out of a population 
of the character and extent of this Asylum, speaks volumes for the good care taken of the 
patients, and also must be regarded as proof of good hygienic arrangements. To-day only 
nine patients are in bed. 

In addition to good health, the condition and appearance of the patients are highly 
satisfactory. Except in ward 7, there was very little noise and excitement. There, 
however, there was abundance of both. I was glad to observe, that even in this ward 
there were only three cases of mechanical restraint. It would appear that through the 
absence of restraint and by careful watching on the part of the attendants, the tendency 
to destructiveness and violence is harmlessly and happily carried off by a little noise and 
boisterousness. There were only two other cases of restraint and one of seclusion on the 
female side of the house, and none whatever on the male side. 

I was present in some of the wards when the meals were served, and with the excep- 
tion of the bread, found the food to be good and very well prepared and served. Res- 
pecting the bread supply, as the flour has frequently been inspected and reported excel- 
lent, it is clear that the fault must be in the baking. The Baker has received three 
warnings from me to improve the quality and has faded. Under these circumstances, and 

29 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



having regard to the necessity for having that important food staple of the very best 
quality, the Superintendent will ask the Baker to resign and another man will be appointed 
to the place. 

The internal appearance of the Asylum continues to be improved by painting, etc., 
and the condition of the wards, beds, etc., is most satisfactory. Some of the halls are yet 
rather bare of furnishings. An order will be given for 30 perforated settees for the best 
wards, and 15 plain comfortable ash benches for the others. 

The Medical Superintendent reports that the laundry work is being very satisfactorily 
done. On visiting that department, it was noticed that there was an absence of neatness 
about the place. An improvement in that respect was asked for. 

The farm, garden and ornamental portion of the grounds were all gone over at this 
visit and found in admirable order, and the indications of a good crop were most favourable. 
The recommendation which I made last year, that steps be taken to secure to the Asylum 
the plot of land, containing about 23 acres, south of the Asylum wall and known as the 
old Exhibition Grounds, has met with the approval of Government. The corporation hav- 
ing consented to exchange the land for other lots owned by the Province, more distant from 
the Asylum (the value of the properties and the terms of exchange to be determined by 
three Arbitrators), the Medical Superintendent is authorized to enter into possession of the 
land and proceed to cultivate it. 

Great complaint having been made during the past two years, by persons living near 
the Asylum, of the stench from the pig pens, the Superintendent will at once take steps 
to remove the pigs to a temporary pen to be erected on the newly acquired ground. An 
appropriation will be asked for the erection of brick pens at a more suitable point. 

Inspection was again made of the Asylum on the 13th and 14th October, when the 
following minute was entered in the Inspector's book. 

Since my last inspection and up to the close of the official year, 1 1 men and 9 women 
have been admitted to the Asylum, and during the same period, 703 patients have been 
in the house, of whom 22 have been discharged, 6 have died, and 2 have been transferred 
to Hamilton, leaving 673 in residence. From the 30th September up to to-day there 
have been 3 admissions, 1 discharge and 2 deaths. 

Respecting the 11 admissions, 2 were re-admissions, and with the exception of 2, all 
were paying patients. 

Of the 22 discharges, the Asylum records shew that only 5 were sent away cured, 
and one of these was subsequently returned, being a case of recurrent insanity ; 11 are 
entered as having been di.scharged in an improved and 6 in an unimproved condition. 

That the statistical information in respect to admissions and discharges may be ren- 
dered more complete, the Medical Superintendent will be good enough to indicate in the 
register all re-admissions, and the number of times such patients have been re-admitted. 
I have again to note an unprecedentedly low death rate, and it is rather remarkable that 
between the 20th March and 30th September, out of a population of nearly 400 women, 
only one of that sex died. The suicide, by hanging, of a patient is the only death calling 
for comment. The act took place in the patient's bed-room — a single room — between 
2.30 and 3 a.m. The patient had that day been transferred to another ward and had the 
Day Supervisor of that ward informed the Night Watch, as it was his duty to do, that 
the patient was suicidal, in all probability the unfortunate occurrence would not have 
happened. To guard, as much as possible, against the recurrence of such an act, the 
Medical Superintendent will instruct all Day Supervisors when they receive the notifica- 
tion papers from the Superintendent's office, along with suicidal patients, to hand the 
same to the Night Watch, before going off duty on the evening of the day the patient 
is received. When suicidal patients are transferred to other wards, the same precaution 
to be carefully followed. The Medical Superintendent will further instruct the Night 
Watches to visit the separate rooms in which suicidal patients are sleeping, oftener than 
in ordinary cases. The suicide referred to was a very determined one, and it does not 
appear that it could have been prevented by any structural precaution, other than the use 
of a padded room and the removal of all furniture therefrom. 

In checking the Asylum roll, I, of course, saw every patient in the house, with many 
of whom I conversed. Except the usual number who "wanted to go home," all were 

30 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. «.) A. 1880 



very well contented and no complaints were received. As is usually the case in this 
Asylum, the male wards were very peaceful and quiet, but in some of the female wards 
there was a good deal of noise, but neither roughness nor violence. 

I have again pleasure in recording the almost entire absence of mechanical restraint. 
There is none whatever on the male side, and only one very mild case on the female side, 
together with one' seclusion. Seven of the males and 10 of the females are in bed — a rather 
greater number than usual. One of the women is at the point of death and three more are in 
a very low state. Of a few, however, it is stated that they have just retired to bed to rest. 
The dress of the male patients, respecting which fault has been so frequently found, 
is only fairly satisfactory. A new tailor will shoi'tly be appointed, and it is to be hoped 
that the tit of the clothes will be much improved. The female patients are, as a general 
thing, neatly and tidily dressed. As authorized some time ago, the female attendants are 
now supplied with a uniform ward dress. Their improved appearance is very marked. 

The dinners which I saw and tasted, consisted of soup, boiled beef, potatoes, beets, 
bread and butter, and to the weakly tapioca-pudding. Everything was good, and in the 
superior wards the serving was very well done. 

The Asylum throughout, in respect to order and cleanliness, maintains its claim to a 
most favourable report. In every direction it is a pattern for cleanliness, and nearly 
everywhere good order prevails. The perforated and plain seats ordered some time ago, 
have been received and add much to the comfort and appearance of the wards in which 
they are placed. A good deal more of the wall surface has been painted, which has added 
to the brightness of the parts, and the entrance hall has been improved with a small aqua- 
rium and fountain. 

The work of reconstructing the airing verandahs has been completed by the Public 
"Works Department, and they are now very much improved in appearance. Care should 
be taken, however, that exercise in these verandahs is only looked upon as an adjunct to 
out-door recreation and not as a substitute therefor, as in the latter case it would be better 
to remove the verandahs, although in bad weather and for the use of invalid patients ther 
are of great service. 

The bathing arrangements of this Asylum are not at all satisfactory, and notwith- 
standing all the improvements which have "been made to the building and its furnishings 
the bath-rooms have remained untouched. They are floored with common pine, and the 
tubs are of iron of a rough pattern and quite uncased. The exhalations from the floors, 
which are saturated with water and steam, are very offensive. The Medical Superin- 
tendent is authorized to proceed at once with the reconstruction of one of the bath-rooms 
in the wings, the floors to be laid with the best quality of Portland cement, and the tubs 
to be encased with well-jointed woodwork, and the connections to be of the best quality 
now in Asylum use. A lock-up press to be erected in the room for brooms, brushes and 
cleaning materials, which are now lying loose in the room. The work as much as possible 
to be done by the Asylum Engineer and Carpenter. The Bursar to keep an account of all 
expenditures for material and labour for future estimates. 

There still remain in the Asylum about 265 of the old dilapidated bedsteads (which 
have been in use for over twenty years), with straw ticks. It will be recommended that 
100 new bedsteads, hair mattresses, palliasses, etc., be purchased during the ensuing year, 
to replace the worst of these beds, and for which an appropriation will be required. 

Having regard to the large proportion of paying patients in this Asylum, and the 
probability that the number will be still further increased (there being little likelihood 
that a private Asylum will be established in the Province for many years to come), I am 
of the opinion that the entire space of the wings should be devoted to that class of patients. 
The upper wards are now occupied by free patients, which prevents the approaches to, and 
the surroundings of the wings from being uniformly improved, which could be done if the 
wings where exclusively occupied by paying patients. In addition to the furniture and 
furnishings required for these two upper wards, all of the paying wards should be more 
liberally provided with means of amusement and recreation. 

The new kitchen is now fitted up with the steam cooking appliances, and is reported 
to give satisfaction, with the exception of two defective boilers, which the contractor will 
be required to make good. 

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43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



In my last report I recommended two much needed works, viz. : the erection of new 
coal-sheds, and a new amusement hall and chapel ; these, together with the requirements 
referred to in the present report, will be brought to the attention of the Government, with 
a recommendation that an appropriation be asked at the next session of the Legislature 
to enable the works to be done. 



Asylum for the Insane, London. 

Description of the Building as Furnished by the Architect of the Public 

Works Department. 

The site of the Asylum buildings is about 2 miles east of the City of London, on 
Dundas street, and contains 196 acres. 

The Grand Trunk Railway, from London to Saint Mary's, runs through the south- 
eastern angle of the site. 

One hundred acres in addition to the above, adjoining the road on the west of the 
Asylum site, were purchased for farm purposes. 

The total length of the main building is 610 feet, and 220 feet from the front of 
the centre building to the rear of the wings which recede from the front line. 

The plan, as designed by the Architect of the Public Works Department, is on the 
Linear principle, on which the Asylums in the United States have recently been con- 
structed as it permits of the introduction of windows at the ends of the corridors in the 
wards thereby affording a greater quantity of light and better ventilation than the ordin- 
ary method. 

The materials are of London white bricks, and cut stone dressings from the Guelph 
quarries, the whole of the buildings being roofed with Melbourne slate. 

The centre building includes Bursar's office, reception room, and apartments for the 
Assistant Physician and attendants, being four storeys in height, and 90 feet in depth. 

The wards adjoining the centre building are three storeys in height, of 11 feet each, 
the upper storeys 12 feet, and 42 feet in depth, not including the projections. 

The wino-s are 100 feet in length, receding 60 feet from the front liney and 42 feet in 
depth two storeys in height, connected with rear wings, 94 feet by 37 feet, by transverse 
wards, 120 feet by 37 feet, two storeys in height. 

Airin<T yards, enclosing areas of 250 feet by 200 feet, adjoining the wards on the 
east and west, are surrounded by brick walls 10 feet in height, sunk below the level on 
the front and sides, so as to be overlooked by the patients, and each yard is provided ^s^th 
a shed on the north side. 

In the rear of the centre building, and connected by a covered passage, 50 feet by 10 
feet and one storey in height, are the kitchen and laundry, each 39 feet by 32 feet, with 
scullery and bakery, also store rooms. In the upper storey are the drying and ironing 
rooms, with store rooms, stairs, &c., each storey being 13 feet in height. 

A boiler and steam engine of 30-horses power have been placed in the rear for the 
purpose of driving the washing machines, wringers and other appliances, the steam being 
also used for cooking by means of kettles, etc. 

A small tramway along the covered passage, with a waggon, conveys the food to two 
lifts openin<^ into dining rooms, 82 feet by 42 feet, in the rear of the centre building, on 
two storeys; an amusement hall being provided over the same, 18 feet in height, on the 

third storey. 

The corridors in the wards are 12 feet in width, except rear wards, which are 10 feet. 

The associated dormitories, opening off the corridors, are 31 feet by 20 feet, 25 feet 
bv 12 feet and 22 feet by 18 feet, and each ward has a sitting room, attendant's apart 
ment bath and wash rooms, water-closets, clothes and dust shafts, with separate stairways 
to corridors and yards. 

The sinc^le apartments in the front and rear wards, are 12 feet by 6 feet, and 11 feet 
by 7 feet, respectively. 

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The main building, commenced in 1869, and occupied in 1870, affords accommodation 
for 500 patients, the average cubic space allowed for each not being less than 800 feet, 
excluding corridors, staircases and halls. 

The building is heated by steam from four boilers, 12 feet long by 4 feet in diameter, 
and circulating iron pipes one inch in diameter, round the walls, with coils in the corridors 
and principal apartments. 

The boiler-houses were constructed in the rear of the centre building, about midway 
between the centre and extreme wings. 

The walls being hollow throughout, the several apartments are ventilated through the 
spaces both upward through galvanized iron ventilators on the roofs, and underneath the 
floors, there being no basements, openings having been left in the large boiler chimneys, 
which are 5 feet square on the inside, and 90 feet in height. 

The water is supplied from two large wells, the west well being 8 feet in diameter and 
120 feet in depth to the rock. The west well affords the largest quantity daily, having 
been tested to supply 500,000 gallons. From this well the water is pumped into iron 
tanks in the roofs with a capacity of 60,000 gallons. The water from the east well is not 
used, being deticient in both quantity and quality. 

The gas for lighting is supplied by the City Gas Co. of London, the gas mains having 
been extended on Dundas street for the purpose. 

The sewage from the buildings is conveyed by brick drains, 22 inches in diameter, to 
large brick vaults in the south-eastern portion of the grounds, where it is filtered and 
deodorised, the overflow being connected with a creek on the east side of the grounds, 
which empties into the River Thames. 

The avenue to the main building is 100 feet in width, planted with trees on either 
side of the drive, 40 feet wide, the sidewalks being 6 feet wide. This drive is continued 
round the buildings. The grounds are laid out with much taste and bear evidence of con- 
stant attention. 

A separate residence was constructed for the Medical Superintendent on the western 
portion of the grounds, in the rear of the main building, and to the west of the airing 
yard, with a covered passage into the wards. 

The out-buildings consist of a store-house, 70 feet by 30 feet, two storeys in height, 
and basement; two workshops, 60 feet by 30 feet, two storeys in height; two barns, 60 
feet by 20 feet, and 20 feet in height; stable and cow-houses, each 150 feet by 24 feet, one 
storey in height; with waggon-house and granary in the centre, two storeys in height; two 
large coal sheds, 150 feet by 33 feet, and 135 feet by 25 feet, respectively, all constructed 
of brick and slated. Also a root-house, 140 feet by 30 feet, of brick, arched with the 
same material, and covered with earth. A waggon and ice-house, 80 feet by 20 feet each, 
were also constructed of wood on the south side of the Farm buildings. 

In addition to the main building, three single cottages were also constructed of brick, 
for chronic patients, in the northern portion of the grounds, each cottage containing 60 
patients, or ISO in all. The first of these cottages was constructed in 1874, and the 
centre and east cottages in 1877, with coal sheds, 50 feet long by 20 feet wide, one storey 
high, of brick, in the rear of each. One double and one single cottage for attendants were 
constructed on land purchased north of Dundas street, opposite the entrance lodge. 

In 1872, an Asylum for Idiots was constructed in the north-eastern part of the 
ground, of brick, 80 feet by 50 feet, and two storeys in height, besides the basement, and 
when the patients were removed to the Orillia Asylum, two wings, 160 feet by 40 feet, 
two storeys in height, and basement, were added to this building in 1878, whicli is now a 
refractory ward in connection with the main Asylum, affording accoramodiition for 190 
patients. It is heated by steam, and supplied with water and gas from main building. 

The total expenditure on this Asylum to 1878 has been .f584,980, ai\(l it affords 
accommodation for about 900 patients. 

Minutes of Inspection recorded during the year. 

I made three statutory inspections of this Aslyum during the year. At the first visit, 
which extended over the 1st and 2nd January, 1879, I recorded the following minute : — 

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43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



The movements and changes of the population since the 1st October are as follows : 
in residence on that day, 351 men and 356 women — 707 ; admitted during the three months, 
25 men and 22 women; died, 9 men and 3 women; discharged, 13 men and 15 women; 
leaWng on the Asylum register on the 1st January, the names of 354 men and 360 women, 
or a total of 714. Of these, 8 men and 3 women are absent on probation, leaving an actual 
resident population of 703 souls. The Asylum records shew that of the 28 persons dis- 
charged during the quarter, 18 were sent away cured, 5 were improved and 5 unimproved. 
Two of the latter were taken home by their friends in a dying condition, and one was 
returned to his home as an unfit subject for Asylum residence. Respecting the deaths, 
comment is required only in one case, where decease was hastened by the patient being 
scalded while bathing, through carelessness in looking after the key of the tap. An in- 
quest was held, and the jury in returning their verdict, reflected upon the conduct of the 
chief attendant of the ward and exonerated the attendant directly in charge of the 
patient, but on further inquiry being made by the Medical Superintendent, the evidence 
completly acquitted the chief attendant of all blame, and threw it upon his subordinate. 
I therefore felt it my duty to give instructions for the immediate discharge of this atten- 
dant, as I had previously intimated that dismissal would follow any such act of careless- 
ness, as he was guilty of. 

The "Restraint Book," for the keeping of which I gave instruction at a previous in- 
spection, has been examined. During the three months ending 1st January, all cases of 
restraint and seclusion are recorded. Many of them are of the mildest kind and are con- 
fined to a few patients, representing a proportion of only about one and a half per cent, of 
the average daily population. It is noticed that the causes for restraining or secluding a 
patient are not always specifically set forth in the record, other than in general terms, 
such as " violent," " dangerous," etc. In future the particular acts constituting these 
conditions must be entered. 

Only 4 patients are observed under restraint on the day of my ^dsit, and none are 
secluded. 

The bodily condition and external appearance of the patients are generally satisfactory 
and the health of the asylum is exceptionally good, only 6 patients, all females, being con- 
fined to their beds. 

The corridors and sleeping apartments in the main Asylum, and the cottages, are all 
in perfect order, and in the female departments they are particularly clean and neat in 
appearance. The same may be said of the olficial and domestic quarters of the Asylum, 
with the exception of the upper hall in the main building, which is rather untidy. 

The opening of the new addition to the laundry and the new drying-room has much 
improved that department. It is to be hoped that its capacity is now quite sufiicient for 
the present and future wants of the Asylum. The steam in the new addition is very 
dense. A porch should be erected at the rear entrance and the ceiKng ventilators should 
be always kept open. 

The apparently dangerous condition of the large tank in the garret of the main 
building will be at once brought to the notice of the Public Works Department, with a 
request that a very careful examination may be made of its bearings and supports, which 
appear to be giving way at some points. Until this examination is made, it would be 
best not to use the amusement hall for dancing. 

In order that the new Refractory Wards may be opened and occupied not later than 
the 1st February, the Bursar is authorized to complete the furnishing of the I'ooms in the 
main building, and the ofiicers" and attendants' quarters ; purchasing at the lowest possible 
rates the minor articles of furniture for which tenders could not be asked. A list of 
such furnishings has been made for his guidance. 

The shelving of the store-rooms in each ward of the Refi'actory Asylum should be 
proceeded with at once, and the Public Works Department will be asked to place wii-e 
coverings over the steam pipes. 

As soon as the refractory patients are removed to the new building, the wards at 
present occupied by them, must be thoroughly cleaned, white-washed and painted, so as to 
brighten up and improve their appearance, before occupation by ordinary patients. 

It is most desirable that an account should be kept of the work performed by the 

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43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



carpenters. The Medical Superintendent will therefore provide the chief carpenter with 
a proper form of book, and instruct him to record therein the number of carpenters and 
patients employed daily, the nature of the work done, the value of the material used and 
the value of the labour. The usual hours of work, which are observed in the carpenter 
shops in London, must be enforced in the Asylum service. 

As the farmer has given further evidence of his inability to properly manage a large 
farm, it has been decided to transfer him to the Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, 
where the operations ai-e on a much smaller scale, and to send the Institution farmer to 
the Asylum. 

As recommended in the foregoing minutes, a competent person was sent by the Pub- 
lic Works Department to examine the supports to the water tank in the main building, 
and he reported that there was no evidence of insecurity, and that the amusement hall 
might be used as heretofore without dangei'. The Medical Superintendent was, of 
couse, immediately advised of this. 

I made my second inspection of the Asylum on the 25th and 26th Mai-ch, and the 
following is a record thereof : — 

The names of 730 patients appear on the books, but 10 are absent on probationary 
leave, making the exact population, 720 persons, namely .360 of each sex. Since the 1st 
January, the date of my last visit, 40 patients have been admitted, and 10 deaths and 15 
discharges have taken place. One death was the result of an accident, as a male patient 
was killed by falling through a trap-door from the drying-room into the laundry under- 
neath. At the time of the accident, the trap was hardly safe, as the doors could be left 
open, after the trap had been used, but it has now been altered, and the doors can only 
be opened and held up by cords in the hands of the user, which should insure their being 
closed when the trap is not required. If the Medical Superintendent finds that this 
arrangement does not render the opening pei'fectly safe, he will give instructions for it to 
be moved, placed against the wall at a convenient spot and surrounded by an iron railing 
three and a half feet high. 

The distribution of the patients in the various branches of the Asylum is as follows : 
In the main Asylum, 479; in the three cottages, 179 ; and in the two lately opened wards 
of the Refractory Asylum, 62. 

The health of the Asylum is good and the condition of the patients satisfactory — no 
patients are under restraint and the cases of undue excitement are very few. 

The Asylum in all its departments is in excellent order. The atmosphere in a few of 
the wards is somewhat vitiated, owing to the necessity for the use of double windows and 
the consequent absence for the time being of free window ventilation, which is really 
the only system in force in this Asylum. For that reason, it is desirable that the outside 
windows should be taken off as soon as the weather will permit of it. The solution of 
the problem of providing an effective means of ventilating the wards, especially in winter, 
should be no longer delayed. 

Two of the wards in the refractory branch were opened in February and are now 
occupied by sixty-two patients. The official quarters have been fitted up in accordance 
with the instructions given by me at my last inspection. The wards and interior ar- 
rangements of this building, with few exceptions, are well suited for the class of patients 
they are designed to accommodate. In order to obtain the full benefit of separation and 
classification of the patients, by the removal to this new structure of all whose insanity 
or habits are calculated to excite and discomfort others, it is desirable that two more 
wards should be opened at once. To this end, the Bursar is authorized to purchase what 
additional furniture is absolutely required to fit them up, at an expenditure not exceeding 
$300, and the Medical Superintendent is directed to engage two extra male and female 
attendants for service in the branch Asylum, and to effect the removal of twenty more 
patients of each sex, as soon as the wards are ready to receive them. 

Since my last inspection, some rather important changes have been effected, with my 
sanction, in tlie interior economy of the Asylum. 

The east and west cottages, formerly occupied by males and females respectively, 
are now tenanted by both sexes — the males on one side and the females on the other — • 
each cottage being under the charge of a male attendant and his wife. 

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48 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



The two large associated dining-rooms in the main Asylum, formerly used by both 
sexes jointly, are now separately occupied. 

The Medical Superintendent reports favourably of both these changes, and the con- 
dition of the cottages, as well as of the dining-rooms, corroborates the report. 

The pay list of the Asylum has been minutely examined and the duties of the members 
of the Asylum staff very fully inquired into, and as the result, a memorandum has been 
given to the Bursar of the various changes he is authorized to make in the salaries and 
wages of several of the officials. Instructions were also given regarding the staff to be 
placed in the refractory wards. 

It has just come to my knowledge that the occupants of the gate-houses have been 
allowed bread, milk and vegetables from the Asylum stores. As this practice was com- 
menced some years ago, without authority, the Medical Superintendent is requested to see 
that it be stopped, as in addition to the salary paid to these occupants for their services in 
the Asylum, they get a free house with fuel, light and water, as payment for gate-duty 
performed by their families. 

The increased cost of clothing for patients, suggests the desirableness of an effort 
being made by the Medical Superintendent and Bursar, to get a greater number of the 
friends and relatives of the insane to provide clothing, even when no money payment is 
made for maintenance. To this end, the Medical Superintendent is requested to see that 
the answers to queries and other information relating to patients, are sent to the Bursar 
when received, in order that he may gain particulars regarding the ability of the patients' 
friends to pay for maintenance. 

As soon as the steam heating for the season is over, the Medical Superintendent will 
instruct the Engineer to proceed with the alterations of the water-closets on the male side 
of the main buiding, and the Bursar is autliorized to purchase necessary materials to the 
extent of $160. He is also authorized to buy on capital account, a large sewing machine 
for the tailoi'ing department, and a batli for the officei's' quarters of the refractory ward. 

The Medical Superintendent having submitted a plan for the laying out and ornamen- 
tation of the rear premises, to the untidy condition of which I called attention last year, 
he is instructed to commence work in carrying it out as soon as practicable. 

I made a third inspection of the London Asylum on the 9th and 10th July, when I 
enteied the following minutes in the inspection book : 

This Institution and its affairs are found in all respects to be in good working order, 
and the buildings and premises are in their usual well kept condition. 

Since the date of the last inspection, viz. 25th March, the operations of the Asylum 
have been as under : — 

Males. Females. Total. 

In residence on 25th March 362 368 730 

Since admitted 15 19 34 

Total under treatment to lOth July 377 387 764 

Males. Females. Total. 

Died 6 10 16 

Discharged 15 M 29 

Escaped 1 1 

— — — 22 24 46 



355 363 718 

The appearance of the patients and the health of the Asylum are generally satisfac- 
tory, although there have been 16 deaths in a little over three months. 

As the admissions to this Asylum are falling off, and as there are no vacancies in the 
Asylums at Toronto and Kingston, lunatics in the districts allotted to those Asylums will 
be received here foi- the present. 

The roofs on the wings of the main building require attention, as they are in a leaky 
condition, and the Hon. the Commissioner of Public Works will be asked to have an 

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43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8 ) A. 1880 



examination made of the same and the cost of repairing them estimated, so that an 
appropriation may be applied for to pay for the work. 

As the hardwood ordered some time ago has now been delivered, the Medical Superin- 
tendent will have the side stairways and floors leading into the male side of the house 
laid therewith, and well oiled. The alterations to the water-closets, authorized at the time 
of my last visit, are now nearly completed. The ventilation of the laundry has been much 
improved by carrying out the directions given by me, with that object in view. 

The Medical Superintendent and Engineer have suggested a scheme for combining all 
the present asylum boilers in one central boiler-house, and conveying the steam therefrom 
for heating purposes to the main building and wings, the cottages, refractory ward, and the 
Medical Superintendent's house. It is alleged that if this plan be adopted, the services 
of three stokers could be dispensed with, and a saving made of at least 150 tons of coal 
a year. The Superintendent is requested to submit his scheme in writing, with an esti- 
mate of the cost of cai'rying it out. . 

The question of providing for a supply of water in the event of the present pumping 
appliances giving way, has also been discussed. In view of the possibility of such an 
emergency, it is considered important that another well of the same capacity as the present 
one should be placed in the east of the Asylum, with corresponding pumping appliances. 
The Medical Superintendant will also submit to me an estimate of the cost of carrying 
out this proposition, and likewise of the adoption of his scheme for improving the means 
of extinguishing a fire : these estimates will all be brought before the Hon. the Commis- 
sioner of Public Works. 

The land attached to the Asylum for farm, garden and oi-namental purposes is in ad- 
mirable condition. The appearance of the farm warrants the expectation that the crop 
of cereals and roots will be sufficient for the wants of the Asylum. The Medical Super- 
intendent reports that the farmer transferred from Belleville on trial, gives satisfaction and 
appears to be a capable man. His appointment to the position of farmer to the London 
Asylum will therefore be permanent. 

The garden is in good order, and the yield promises to be a large one. It is desirable that 
the lower portion of the garden enclosure should be levelled, put in order and cultivated, but 
this cannot be done until the brick sewer from the mouth of the filtering vault is continued 
to the garden fence, and some tile-drainage is also done. The Medical Superintendent will 
submit an estimate of the cost of these works. 

The ornamentation of the rear yards and premises, as authorized by me, has been 
commenced, and considerable progress made with gravelling »nd levelling. It is desirable 
that the work should be prosecuted with as mxich speed as possible, and authority is given 
for the expenditure of the small balance remaining at the credit of the capital appro- 
priation, in the material most needed. The terracing of the front of the Refractory Ward 
grounds has not yet been done, although it is claimed that the work has been finished 
according to contract. The Medical Superintendent will submit an estimate of what it 
will cost to put the grounds in pi^oper oi-der. 

The delivery of coal under the contract is going on; it appears to be of excellent 
quality and in good order. 

Application has been made by some of the mechanics employed to be allowed to have 
dinner in the A.sylum. Considering that efforts have been made to do away with this 
objectionable practice in other public institutions, authority cannot be given for its being 
commenced here. 

It is very important that the exact cost, under every heading, of maintaining lunatics 
in each Department of the Asylum should be known ; that is, in the Main Asylum, the 
Refractory Wards and the Cottages, so that a knowledge may be had of the relative 
cost in the three different departments. If the present system of book-keeping will not 
shew this, the Medical Superintendent and Bursar will take such steps as will enable this 
information to be correctly and accurately given. 

Dr. Metcalf, the former Assistant Superintendent of this Asylum, having been ap- 
pointed to the Superintendency of the Kingston Asylum, the following promotions and 
appointments have been made by the Government, viz. : — 

Dr. T. J. W. Burgess, promoted to the position of Assistant Superintendent, at $1,000 

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43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



per annum ; Dr. X. H. Beemer, promoted to the position of First Assistant Physician, at 
a salary of 81,000 per annum; Dr. T. Milman, appointed Second Assistant Physician, at 
$600 a year. 

The Bursar is authorized to make the changes in the pay list, rendered necessary by 
these appointments. 

The list of paying patients has been examined, and sundry instructions given to the 
Bursar for his guidance in the collection of maintenance in certain cases. 



Asylum for the Insane, Kingston. 

Description of the Building, furnished by the Architect of the Public Works 

Department. 

This building, late Rockwood Asylum, is situated on the north shore of Lake 
Ontario, near the Village of Portsmouth, about two miles from the City of Kingston. 

The site, containing 35 acres, was purchased from the late Judge Cartwright, in 1856, 
and the erection of the building was commenced in 1859, was constructed chiefly by con- 
vict labour, under the superintendence of the late W. Coverdale, Architect, and was first 
occupied in 1866. 

In addition to the above, 70 acres of land were purchased in 1878, by arbitration, 
adjoining the present site on the east, and application has been made to the Dominion 
Government for the purchase of 100 acres of Ordnance lands on the west side. 

The original site and buildings were purchased from the Dominion Government by 
arbitration in 1877, the amount paid being $96,500. 

The building is constructed of coursed cut-stone from the Penitentiary quarries, for 
outside work, and brickwork on the inside, and consists of a central portion and two 
wings which are connected with the central block, making the total front 351 feet, the 
roofs being of tin. 

Tlie east and west wings are each 39 feet wide, by 1 25 feet in depth, and 4 storeys 
in height : the central block is 67 feet -ndde, and 103 feet in depth, also 4 storeys 
in height ; the connecting portions between this block and the ^vings on either side 
are each 103 feet in length, by 43 feet in depth, and 3 storeys in height. The above 
heights do not include the basement, which was constructed under the building, and ar- 
ranged for air shafts and steam heating pipes on the indirect system, connected with large 
steam boilers, the air being driven by a fan through openings in the walls into each 
apartment at the top, and foul air shafts from the bottom of each apartment to the roofs. 

The architecture is of a plain description in the Italian style, the dome on the centre 
building being in good proportion, and the general appearance being of an imposing 
description. 

The building affords accommodation for 400 patients, and with the cottage on the west 
for 30 female chronic patients, gives a capacity for 430 in all. There is a separate resi- 
dence for the Medical Superintendent, also some farm and out-buildings which were on 
the original site when purchased. 

Additions were made by the Public Works Department, Ontario, in 1878, consisting 
of a coal house 100 feet by 36 feet, and 2 storeys in height, also an extension to the 
laundry 96 feet long by 36 feet wide, and 2 storeys in height, the walls being of cut 
stone to correspond with other work. 

The pumping engine house was also enlarged, and the roof of the old laundry raised. 
The water is pumped from Lake Ontario into a large tank in the roof, containing about 
10,000 gallons, from whence the water is distributed to the several baths, wash-rooms, 
and water-closets, which are provided for each ward. 

The sewers are of large size and empty in Lake Ontario. 

The light is procured from coal oil and lamps. 

The centre building contains Medical Superintendent and Bursar's offices, reception- 
room, apartments for the attendants, and two dining-rooms on each floor for the patients, 
31 feet by 14 feet, with lifts, etc. 

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The apartments for the patients are nearly all separate, 12 feet by 7 feet, and 11 
feet by 7 feet 9 inches wide, each storey being 12 feet and a half in height, giving 1150 
cubic feet to each patient. 

The associated dormitories are only 6 in number, 16 feet square in the extreme wings. 

Minutes of Ixspectiox recorded during the year. 

My first inspection of the Kingston Asylum during the year was made on the 19th 
February, when I recox'ded the following minute in the book kept for that purpose : — 

The movements of the patients since the 1st October, are as follows : — Remaining 
in residence on that day -418, admitted since 17, making the number under treatment 435. 
Of these 9 have died and 13 have been discharged, leaving the names of 413 on the roll, 
but as one patient is out on probation, the actual population is 412, viz., 204 men 
and 208 women. The number of beds made up being 430 (equally divided between the 
sexes), it would appear there are 17 vacancies. There are applications on file for the 
admission of 8 patients not yet brouglit in. The remainder of the vacancies will be filled 
up with the most urgent cases in the gaols east of Belleville. The Acting Medical Superin- 
tendent reports that all applications from priv^ate families, within the district allocated to 
the Kingston Asylum, have been attended to. Since the 1st October, a female patient 
has been received from the Penitentiary, whose term of sentence had expired. 

The patients have all been seen, and their condition and appearance ai'e satisfactory. 
The health of the patients is wonderfully good, only two of the entire population being- 
confined to bed. 

The records show that frequent and continued restraint and seclusion are now things 
of the past in this Asylum. There is not a solitary case of restraint in existence at this 
visit, and only one patient is secluded. 

The state of the Asylum in regard to cleanliness and order, is worthy of great praise. 
As soon as the new bedsteads are obtained, greater neatness can be observed in the mak- 
ing up of the beds. It is evident that the affairs of the Asylum are conducted with great 
order and regularity. 

The following improvements may at once be proceeded with, under the direction of 
the Acting Medical Superintendent : — 

The stone walls of the upper flat of the new store-room to be sheeted with matched 
boards, sheh-ing for dry -goods and gi'oceries to be put up, a small office to be partitioned 
off, and sufiicient steam pipes to be placed in the upper store-room to heat it. 

The carpenter's shop to be removed to the room under the new store-room, and the 
old shop fitted up for the tinsmith and paint shop. 

The lath and plaster partition separating the disused drying-room from No. 9 Ward 
to be taken down, and a portion of that room pai'titioned oft' for a bath-room and water- 
closet. The elevation of the basement water-closet to be raised, so as to increase the fall 
from it. 

The two unpainted wards to be painted, if the walls will admit of it. 

The walls of the sitting-room in the cottage to be painted. 

The Acting Medical Superintendent is authorized to make a requisition upon the 
Bursar for lumber and material required for these improvements. The accounts for the 
same to be charged to capital appropriation. 

An appropriation having been granted for cribbing the water front of the Asylum, 
authoi-ity is given to purchase such timber as may be required for the top tier of the crib- 
work ; the material on hand to be used for the other portions. 

If the useless old iron now lying about the premises can be sold, an iron table for 
the kitchen may be substituted for the present dilapidated wooden one. 

The purchase of a sufficient quantity of good curled hair is authorized, for the purpose 
of renewing a portion of the pillows. 

A requisition should be submitted for my approval for certain articles of coarse 
furniture required for Ward No. 9. 

The dinner served to the patients to-day consisted of boiled beef, white beans, pudding, 

39 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



bread, etc. The food was very well prepared and served, and, as a general thing, good 
order prevailed in the dining-rooms. 

The bread is made entirely of spring wheat, and although good and sweet, is dark. 
As soon as the tinsmith shop is moved to the carpenter's old shop, storage-room will be 
provided for flour, and the proper proportion of spring and fall wheat can be used. 

The Acting Medical Superintendent is authorized to engage a housemaid to attend to 
the officers' quarters in the centre building, the duty now being very improperly performed 
by a patient. 

The absence of the engineer, assistant-engineer and stoker from the Asylum premises 
at night is attended with danger. The Acting Medical Superintendent will at once give 
orders for the assistant-engineer and stoker, respectively, to remain upon the premises, and 
on duty every alternate night. 

A mason or plasterer may be engaged temporarily, as such work may necessitate. 

The Acting Medical Superintendent will be good enough to examine the records in 
the offices of the Township Clerk and Registrar, in respect to the lane between the 
Asylum property and the Cartwright estate, about to be taken over, reporting all the facts 
to me, so that action may be taken with a view to the closing up of the lane. 

He will also be good enough to report upon the extent of the house accommodation 
which will be provided, when the Cartwright and Jackson properties are taken over, and 
he will also state what condition the houses are in, and what repairs, if any, are required. 

The following is a record of my second in.spection, made on the 1 1th April :— The 
Register shewed a population of 416, but 4 were absent on probation, making the actual 
number in residence 412, viz., 202 men and 210 women. 

There are still a few vacancies for males, but none for females. In passing through 
the wards, no men are found under restraint or in seclusion, and only 2 females appear 
to be subjected to restraint, and the patients are very quiet, although very few are out, 
it being Good Friday. 

It was noticed that a woman had the previous evening smashed the glass in her room 
and cut her hands ; an occurrence which the Acting Medical Superintendent states, rather 
frequently takes place. To provide a remedy for this, he is authorized to order wire shutters 
of close meshes for two of the single bed-rooms in each of the female wards ; the shutters 
to be hinged so as to admit of their being opened when required. The halls, sleeping 
rooms and dining-rooms, etc., were all found in excellent order, the beds were neatly made 
up and the air throughout appeared to be free from bad odour. 

A good deal of the work authorized in my previous minutes is now finished and the 
resb is in progress. Ward No. 9 is greatly improved by these changes, and when tini.shed 
and some additional furniture provided, it will be one of the most comfortable wards in 
the Asylum, instead of being the reverse, as formerly. The Engineer suggests that this 
ward could be very efficiently heated by bx'inging the hot air into it from the boiler- 
house (which is in close proximity), by pipes and registers. Believing this suggestion to 
be a good one, the Engineer is authorized to proceed with the work. 

As soon as the frost is out of the ground, the Acting Medical Superintendent will 
cause the proposed new avenue to the Asylum to be staked out, as per amended sketch plan 
which has been submitted to me. The work may be gone on with when the Village and 
Township Councils have consented to the Asylum taking possession of the lane between 
the present Asylum property and the " Cartwright Estate " about to be acquired. When 
the Acting Superintendent is notified to take possession of the properties now being 
negotiated for, he will take down the cow-sheds at the side gate on the Watt property. 
The allocation of the houses to emfjloyes and the terms upon which they are to be occupied, 
cannot be determined until they are formally taken possession of. 

Inspection was made of this Asylum on Monday, 28th September, and the following 
minute recorded : — 

There are on the Asylum Register the names of 417 patients, of whom 206 are males 
and 211 females. 

Fourteen men and 11 women, have been admitted since my last visit on 11th April, 
14 inmates have been discharged and 10 have died. — The proximate cause of death in 
three cases was phthisis ; in one, blood-poisoning from the bite of another patient ; in two» 

40 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers {No. 8.) A. 1880 



chronic diarrhoea ; in one, congestion of the brain ; in one, general paresis ; and in the re- 
maining two, exhaustion of mania. 

One of the male patients, admitted since my previous visit, came from the Brockville 
Gaol in a state of utter exhaustion and in a most filthy bodily condition. His death took 
place a few days after his reception into the Asylum. In view of the conflicting statements 
of the Asylum and Gaol authorities as to the bodily condition of this man, the Medical 
Superintendent will in future see that the person bringing a ianatic into the Asylum 
whether a sheriif s officer or relation, remains in the Asylum until the patient is examined 
in the presence of such officer or relative, and his or her bodily state ascertained. 

At this visit I have chocked the Asylum Register ; in doing so, I have seen every 
patient in the Asylum. 

On the male side thei'e is not a single case of restraint or seclusion, no one is in 
bed, and the absence of excitement is veiy marked. On the female side, however, there 
is in some wards a good deal of excitement and boisterousness, but only two patients 
have on leather muffs, one the mittens, and one destructive patient is secluded and in ad- 
dition has wristlets on. 

The dress of the patients is very satisfactory, particularly on the female side. Fewer 
patients are in canvass dresses than at any other visit. 

I have a very favourable report to make of the condition of the wards, dormitaries, etc. 
All are admirably clean and very neatly kept ; and with one or two exceptions, thev are 
light and cheerful in appearance. 

Now tliat the structural condition and appearance of the Asylum is satisfactory, it is 
most desirable that the wards should be rendered more comfortable by the supply of addi- 
tional furniture. Some of the wards have a bare and unfurnished look which can be 
remedied by a small outlay. A strong recommendation will be made for an appropriation 
to be voted next session of Parliament for this service. In the meantime, I have to request 
that the Medical Superintendent will prepare a statement showing fully the requirements 
of each ward in the way of furnishings and decorations. There are also required one 
hundred new bedsteads, to replace the worst of the old dilapidated wooden ones now in use. 

This is now the only Asylum in the Province in which straw beds are exclusively used. 
In addition to their being more costly in the end than hair mattresses, their repeated fillino- 
and daily making up causes litter and disorder in the bedrooms. It will be recommended 
that all the new bedsteads furnished this year and those recommended to be furnished 
next year, making 270 in all, be supplied with hair mattresses. 

The water-closets in many of the wards are very defective in construction, and diffi- 
cult to keep clean. In one or two wards they have been reconstructed and greatly im- 
proved at a trifling cost. The Superintendent is authorized to have all of them done in 
the same manner. 

The sewer pipe from the cottage does not connect with the main sewer but runs into 
the " Forty-foot Road." Provision will be made for remedying this next year. 

The condition of the cultivated land, garden, and ornamental portions of the grounds, 
is very satisfactory and creditable. The yield of roots will be ample for the wants of the 
Asylum. Work on tlie grounds afibrds a means of healthful and profitable employment 
for a large number of patients, which will be still further increased when the land lately 
acquired is fully cultivated and used. 

I will again urgently recommend that the Ordnance Lands adjoining the Asylum, and 
south of the main road, be acquired from the Dominion Government. 

The new stores are now completed and fully occupied. They are in excellent order 
and are well adapted for the storage and delivery of Asylum supplies. 

The new laundry has been occupied for a considerable time, and it is better than any 
of those attached to any of the other public institutions. It is exceedingly well kept. 

The new carpenter shop is also in use. It is well suited to the requirements of the 
Asylum, and a great deal of work is now being turned out from it. 

The Medical Superintendent is authorized to purchase a good driving horse and six 
milch cows. 

He is also authorized to purchase such books as are required for the keeping of the 
proper statistical records of the Asylum operations. 

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43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



Dr. W. G. Metcalf having been permanently appointed to the position of Medical 
Superintendent, vice Dr. Dickson, resigned, the Bursar ^vill place his name on the pay list 
at the rate of .81,600 per annum. 

The Medical Superintendent reports favourably of the performance of duty by the 
ofl&cers, attendants, and servants of the Institution. 

The Township and Village Council having refu.sed to close the lane known as the 
" Forty -foot Road," running between the old Asylum property and the CartAvright estate, 
lately attached to the Asylum, I will recommend that an Act of Parliament be brought in 
during next Session to shut up this lane, as it is of no use to ihe public, and only furnishes 
a means of trespass on the Asylum grounds, greatly to the annoyance of the patients and 
the authorities. 

The following external improvements and constructions are required, and appropria- 
tions will be recommended to enable the works to be proceeded with next year : — 

First. — The erection of a picket fence (of the same description as at the London 
Asylum), all round the Asylum property, and the reconstruction of the stone wall at the 
entrance to the Avenue, with an iron railing on top. 

The necessity of proceeding with this work is shewn by the fact that the present 
dilapidated fences, which are of every pattern and style, have to be propped up every 
spring to keep them from falling down. 

Second. — The erection of a stone wall to enclose sufficient space on the female side 
of the Asylum, for an airing yard for refractory women patients, the want of which is 
one of the most serious deficiencies in this Asylum. 

Third. — The completion of the gas works for the Asylum, a portion of which have 
been constructed, and the improvement of the water supply as recommended in a previous 
report. 

Fourth. — The substitution of three large tubular boilers, and one smaller one for 
cooking, etc., for the four old Cornish boilers now in use. The adoption of this recom- 
mendation would, it is estimated, effect a sa^dng of 400 tons of coal per annum. 

Fifth. — The re-pointing of the stone walls of the Asylum, neglect of which is caus- 
ing great injury to the walls, owing to the lodgment of frost and water. 



Asylum for the Insane, Hamilton. 

Description of the Building, furnished by the Architect of the Public Works 

Department. 

The central portion of this building was designed by the late Mr. Kauffman, Archi- 
tect, Toronto, in 1873, for an Inebriate Asylum, but was alteretl to a Lunatic Asylum in 
1875, under the directions of the Public Works Department. 

The site, consisting of about 96 acres, is on the hill immediately south of the City 
of Hamilton, and close to the limits, the distance from the City Hall being about two miles. 

The centre building consists of a basement, 3 storeys, and mansard roof, the length 
being 180 feet and width .50 feet. 

The wings, which were erected in 1877-8, recede from the front line of the main 
building, and are 135 feet in length by 52 feet in width, four storeys in height including 
the basement and mansard, each storey being 12 feet in height, except basement and 
mansard, which are 11 feet. 

The wings are connected with the main building at the east and west ends by means 
of transverse portions 52 feet long by 30 feet in width, 4 storeys in height besides 
basement. 

The style adopted is Modern Gothic, the basement throughout was constructed 
of stone procured from quarries on the ground, the outside work being of coursed ashlar, 
and the walls above the basement were built of red bricks with white brick eave courses 
and arches, the string courses, key -stones, and corbels of windows, etc., being of artificial 
stone. 

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43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



An addition about 100 feet by 50 feet, 4 storeys in height, connected by a passage 
32 feet by 15 feet to the main building was built in the rear of the central portion. 

The single apartments in the central portion are 14 feet long by 10 feet wide, and 
those in the wdngs 12 feet long by 6 feet wide. The associated dormitories are in the 
mansard storey, being 4 in number, 40 feet in length by 14 feet wide. 

Each ward has a dining and sitting-room, -ttdth attendants' rooms, water-closets, bath 
and wash rooms, dust and clothes shafts, also lifts to dining-rooms. 

There is a large dining-room, 56 feet by 47 feet, on the second floor of the rear addi- 
tion for the patients in the main building. 

In the basement of the rear addition there is a kitchen with scullery adjoining, 
bakery, laundry, with lifts fi'om the kitchen and laundry to the upper storeys. 

On the first floor, there is a work-room, also the drying and ironing rooms, and in 
the second and third floors in the rear of the large dining room, and the Amusement 
Hall, there are rooms for female attendants. 

The Amusement Hall in the third storey is the same size as the large dining-room, 
viz., 56 feet long by 47 feet wide, the height of the former being 22 feet in the centre. 

The water is supplied by the City water-works to a large underground tank on Queen 
Street, from whence it is pumped a height of 185 feet to 4 underground tanks containino' 
about 30,000 gallons, in the rear of the building, and by means of a large pump in the 
west boiler house it is forced into 5 tanks in the building, which contain about 20,000 
gallons for supplying baths, washbasins, etc. 

The light is furnished by the Hamilton Gas-light Co. 

The sewage is conveyed by tile pipes from the site to the City drain on Queen Street 
extending to the marsh. 

There are separate residences for the Medical Superintendent, Bursar, Engineer and 
Farmer, also large brick coal shed and farm buildings. 

The Asylum affords accommodation for 500 patients. The total expenditure to 
1878 being $272,845. 

Minutes of Inspection recorded during the year. 

My first inspection of this Asylum during the official year was made on the 27 th 
December, 1878, and the following minutes recorded : — 

In the absence of the Medical Superintendent and the Assistant Physician, I was 
accompanied through the Asylum by the subordinate officials, until a short time before 
my departure, when the Superintendent arrived. 

The changes in the Asylum population since the 1st October are as follows : In resi- 
dence on that day, 82 men and 119 women, a total of 201. Admitted since, 6 men and 1 
woman ; discharged, 1 man and 1 woman ; died, 2 men and 2 women ; leaving in residence 
this day, 85 men and 117 women, or a total of 202 patients. The patients admitted were 
all received under the ordinary process, and one of them is clearly a case of senile dementia 
and could be quite well cared for in the family relation. The Medical Superintendent 
will refrain from awarding admission under the provisions of the Public Asylum Act 
until an Order in Council passes constituting the Hamilton Asylum a general receiving 
institution. 

The condition of the patients is very satisfactory, so far as physical health is concerned. 
No men and only 4 women are in bed. The dress of the men is still very slovenly. 
Authority is given to engage a tailor to cut out and fit the men's clothing in future, before 
it is made up in the sewing-room. 

The Asylum is clean and orderly in appearance, except where work, in connection 
with the new additions, interferes with such a condition. The new kitchen, however, 
which is quite completed and occupied, is not in a tidy or well-kept state. The Medical 
Superintendent is authorized to have a sufficient number of cupboards or dressers made 
by the carpenter to enable the untidiness to be overcome. 

The new dining-hall is now in use, and presents a very fine appearance. Some cup- 
boards are also required here, and the Medical Superintendent is authorized to obtain 
them. The connections with the tea and coffee-urns should be made at once, as the bringing 

43 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



up of the tea, coffee and hot water from the kitchen is attended with considerable trouble. 
The Bursar is authorized to purchase a sufficient quantity of white marbled oilcloth to 
cover the tables. 

The meal arrangements are not exactly satisfactory at present, and not a little con- 
fusion and loss of time takes place in seating the patients. This, of course, will be largely 
overcome when the wings are opened, as the weakly and slow-moving patients will then 
take their meals in the ward dining-rooms. Out of the total population of 2(12, 79 men 
and 96 women were at tea in the new room. 

The amusement hall is now used and supplies a much felt want. The furniture for 
the servants' bed-rooms in the rear of the amusement-hall will be ready in a few days, 
when these rooms can be occupied. The Superintendent will see that the new wings are 
scrubbed and cleaned, as soon as possible, so as to prepare them for the reception of the 
furniture. 

Further examination seems to prove that the allocation of some of the additional 
rooms in the manner previously arranged, would be attended with inconvenience, and, 
therefore, a re-allocation has been made. 

The question of allowing the carpenter rent of a house has been referred to the 
Government, and the decision arrived at is that rent cannot be paid, and that the carpenter 
is only to receive his salary for the services performed. 

I made a second inspection of the Asylum on the 10th and 11th February, of which 
the following is a record : — 

This visit is made chiefly for the purpose of finally completing the arrangements for 
furnishing a portion of the new wings, with a view to their occupation by patients early 
in March. To this end, the Bursar will issue a,n advertisement for tenders for the 
supply of 130 curled hair mattresses, 1.30 curled hair pillows, 130 straw palliasses, 25 oak 
settees, 4 oak tables, and 15 tapestry-covered sofas, according to the specifications I have 
prepared ; such specifications, with samples of the various articles, are to be shewn to all 
persons desirous of tendering. 

The Bursar is authorized to purchase the necessary quantity of knives, forks, spoons, 
plates, etc.; and to obtain offers from the various dry -goods firms for the supply of 100 
white quilts — the offers received to be submitted to me before the quilts are bought. 

When these articles of furniture and furnishings are in stock, along with the bed- 
steads, wash-stands and bureaux received from the Provincial Reformatory, the new wings 
will be sufficiently furnished for the admission of 130 patients. 

The halls to be furnished and occupied are the mansai'd transepts, and the man.sard 
halls on both .sides of the building, and an additional hall on the female side. 

The lower corridors leading to the new wings must be cleaned up and rendered as 
bright "looking as possible ; and therefore the Medical Superintendent is authorized to 
have the woodwork and walls painted a light colour and the ceilings white-washed. The 
floors must also be laid in hardwood and well oiled. 

The population of tlie Asylum at this visit is 205, 175 of whom I saw at breakfast 
in the associated dining-room. Very good order and decorum prevailed at this meal, and 
the food was good, sufficient and well served. None of the resident officers were present ; 
the Medical Superintendent will thei'efore give in.structions for the Assistant Physician 
or Matron to be present at all meals served in the associated room. 

I give hereunder the minutes of a third inspection made on the 1st April : — 

The Asylum is again visited with the object of inspecting the furniture for the new 
wards, supplied by Mr. Re id, whose tender, being the lowest, was accepted. As the 
specifications have been complied with and the quality of all the articles is fully as good 
as the samples exhibited, Mr. Reid's account will be recommended for payment. 

As there are still some furniture and furnishings required to complete the 
equipment of the wards lately opened, the Medical Superintendent will be good enough to 
send to me for approval a requisition for twenty more ash benches, for the pine tables re- 
quired for the dining-rooms, for the requisite furnishings for the attendants' sitting-room 
in the rear extension, and for pictures to decorate the walls of the new wards. 

The Medical Superintendent will remove one bed from each of the small three-bedded 
dormitories in the main building, but before placing them in the new wards, he is author- 

44 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



ized to have their width reduced to that of the new bedsteads and also to have the pal- 
liasses and hair mattresses re-made so as to fit the bedsteads when altered. The work of 
re-making the mattresses to be done in the Asylum. He is also authorized to have 
proper wire guards (not fixtures) made for ten of the windows in the single rooms of the 
new wards for refractory patients. 

Since the reception of acute cases of insanity, a great number of panes of glass have 
been broken. The mistake of putting large panes of glass, which cost over sixty cents 
each, in the windows of an Asylum for the insane is very obvious. The size of the panes 
will have to be reduced by degrees. 

The Medical Superintendent is authorized to purchase six good milch cows, for delivery 
on the 10th May. He will at the same time endeavovir to dispose of the three worthless 
animals now in stock ; and failing that, to fatten them, and when killed collect from 
maintenance account the value of the beef. He is also authorized to purchase a good 
sound team of horses at a price not exceeding $300, disposing of the two broken-down 
animals for what they will bring. 

There were 22.5 patients in residence at this visit, 93 men and 132 women. Since 
the opening of the new wards on the 15th March, 22 patients have been admitted, chiefly 
transfers from Common Gaols. There are now on file L5 applications for admission by the 
ordinary process, and about the same number still in gaols in the Hamilton district. All 
of the latter will be transferred in a few days. 

With the exception of the clothing of some of the male patients, the appeai-ance of 
the inmates is generally satisfactory. 

The condition of the asylum, except where alterations are in progress, is very credit- 
able. The painting of the walls and lime-washing of the ceilings of the main entrance 
hall and the lower wards in the main building, have very much improved the appearance 
of these parts. 

The Medical Superintendent is aiithorized to obtain tenders for painting, in three 
coats, the walls and wood-work of the remaining corridors in the main building ; submit- 
ting these offers for my decision. 

Since the opening of the new wards, it is made pretty evident that the water-closets 
and baths in the wards of the main building can be dispensed with, and the space taken 
for other purposes. If, at the expiration of a month's fair trial (during which time the 
old water-closets and baths must be locked up), the Medical Superintendent is still of the 
opinion that the water-closets and baths in the new wards will be sufficient for the entire 
flat on both sides of the asylum, he is then authorized to have all the fittings and pipes 
removed from the old closets by the engineer and his assistants. 

The Asylum is very much over-heated in some parts. The Superintendent will obtain 
the requisite number of thermometers and place two in each ward, and he will instruct 
the supervisors to examine the degrees of heat registered, and to report the same to him 
daily. It is very evident tiiat the circulation of the steam is defective, as while the lower 
wards are much over-heated, the upper ones are insufficiently heated. 

I made a fourth inspection of the Hamilton Asylum on the 28th May, when I entered 
the following minutes in the Asylum book : — 

I find under treatment 256 patients, namely, 107 men and 149 women. The number 
of beds made up in the Asylum is now as under : 

Beds made up 132 for males, 166 for females. 

In residence 107 males, 149 females. 

Present vacancies 25 males, 17 females. 

Since the opening of the new wards, 63 patients have been admitted ; and as there 
are now no vacancies in the Toronto Asylum, this institution will for some time have to 
serve two districts, whicli will soon exhaust the present accommodation. It will, therefore, 
be necessary to prepare fifty more beds without delay. Bedsteads for that number have 
been received from the Provincial Reformatory, and there are thirty mattresses, palliasses 

45 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



and pillows respectively. The Bursar is authorized to order from Mr. Reid, whose tender 
for the previous supply of furniture was the lowest, 20 hair mattresses, palliasses and pil- 
lows, 10 ash settees and 6 sofas, in order to complete the furnishing required for the accom- 
modation of fifty patients. The goods to be of the same quality and price as those already 
supplied. 

The Medical Superintendent is authorized to have 100 more of the old beds recon- 
structed and reduced in size, at a cost of 80c. each; and to have the same number of mat- 
tresses re-made in the Asylum. 

It is most desirable that the live stock, for which authority to purchase was given 
in last minutes, should be obtained without delay, and as soon as this is done and 
sufficient milk can be supplied from the Asylum cows, the Bursar will notify the present 
milk contractor that no more milk will be required. 

The Bursar has been given instructions regarding the collection of maintenance for 
certain patients. 

The following Special Report, transmitted by me to His Honour, the Lieutenant- 
Governor in Council, in respect to accommodation for Idiots is herewith inserted for the 
information and guidance of the Medical Superintendent : — 

" I have the honour to report that at the present time there are on record applications 
for the admission into the Orillia Asylum of over one hundred idiots, and that the 
monthly return of that Asylum shews that on the 31st May, there were ten more idiots 
in residence than the cubic space regulations properly admit of, and that in many cases 
tw^o inmates have to sleep in one bed, a practice much to be regretted. It is apparent, 
therefore, that something must be done at the earliest possible day to provide Asylum 
accommodation for the more pressing cases. 

" Increased space, however, cannot be provided at the Orillia Asylum for at least two 
years, as nothing can be done until an appropriation be voted by Parliament ; and when 
that is done, it would be a year before the building would be ready for occupation. 
Under these circumstances, very great hardship would ensue to many of the idiots and 
their relations, who are keeping them in their houses. 

" The statute regulating the admission of persons to the Asylums of the Province 
does not absolutely prohibit the reception of idiots into asylums for lunatics, but 
requires that patients shall be certified to be lunatic or insane. Without discussing 
what constitutes lunacy in contradistinction to idiocy, I may state it is of great 
importance in the proper and eflfective treatment of the insane, and in the main- 
taining of proper disciplinary arrangements in the Asylums for lunatics, that idiots 
should be separated entirely therefrom, and the opening of the Orillia Asylum has 
heretofore enabled this to be most efiectually done in the Province of Ontario ; but as 
that Institution is now filled to overcrowding, some other provision must be made for 
the idiots now being cared for in private families and gaols throughout the Province. 
I have therefore to point out that there is a large amount of vacant space in the Asylums 
for the Insane in London and Hamilton, and which will not be fully occupied by lunatics 
for at least two years, and that the exclusion of idiots from one of these two Asylums 
could not I think, be justified to the relatives of those unfortunates waiting admission, 
nor to the public ; and much as I am opposed to the associating of the insane with the 
idiotic in the one institution, I consider that it becomes my duty, to recommend that two 
wards in the recently completed addition to the Hamilton Asylum be set apart for the 
purpose of providing temporary accommodation for idiots, until an extension of the 
Orillia Asylum be completed, when any idiots admitted to the Hamilton Asylum may 
be removed and the wards in question again used for their legitimate objects ; and I 
would further recommend that an Order in Council pass authorizing the reception of 
idiots into the Hamilton Asylum, on the conditions above named, and instructing me 
to make the best possible arrangements for their separation from the insane patients." 

An Order in Council was passed on the 14th June approving of my recommendation, 
and I immediately advised the Medical Superintendent to fit up two of the basement 
wards for the reception of idiots ; the Bursar being authorized to purchase the necessary 
chairs tables, settees, and ticking for straw beds. These wards were opened on the 1 8th 
July and by the close of the official year 27 idiots had been admitted to them. 

46 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



Asylum for Idiots, Orillia. 

Description of the Building, furnished by the Architect of the Public Works 

Department. 

The site of this Asylum is near the northern boundary of the Town of Orillia, and 
on the west shore of Lake Couchiching. 

The original quantity of land was 8 acres, but recently 5 acres were purchased on 
the west side, making in all 13 acres. 

The building was originally intended as an hotel, but was left unfinished, and was 
purchased in 1859 for the sum of $16,800, by the Province of Canada, to be fitted up as 
a Branch Lunatic Asylum in connection with the Toronto Institution. In 1860 plans 
and specifications were prepared for the purpose by the present Architect, etc., of the 
Public Works Department, Ontario, and the building was completed under his superin- 
tendence, the cost being $18,13-5. 

It was opened in 1861, and was continued as a Branch Asylum until 1870, when the 
patients were transferred to the Asylum for Insane, London, on the completion of the 
latter building. 

In 1876 it was again fitted up with some additions for the accommodation of 150 
Idiot patients, under the directions of the Department of Public Works, the total expen- 
diture to 1878 i.eing $39,409. 

The building is 115 feet in front by 56 feet in depth, three storeys in height, 12 feet, 
10 feet, and 11 feet respectively from the ground floor, with wing on the east side 32 feet 
by 24 feet, and rear addition in the centre, 60 feet by 24 feet, for kitchfen and laundry 
purposes, the upper storeys of both being arranged in separate apartments for patients, in 
all 20 in number. 

The remaining apartments consist of associated dormitories, ranging from 30 feet by 
22 feet to 15 feet by 14 feet, and there are 4 dining-rooms 28 feet by 16 feet, with attend- 
ants' apartments, day -rooms, bath and wash rooms and water-closets on each floor, besides 
reception room, and ofiicers' apartments on the ground floor. 

The farm buildings are on the west side, consisting of stables, waggon-house, wood- 
shed, etc. The sewage is discharged into the Lake through tile pipes. 

The building is heated by steam fi'om two boilers with circulating pipes and coils 
throughout the several floors. The water is pumped from the Lake into 3 tanks contain- 
ing about 5,000 gallons. The gas for lighting is made on the premises. 

Minutes of Inspection recorded during the year. 

I visited and inspected this Asylum on the 18th and 19th March. Since the 1st Oc- 
tober last, owing to the want of vacancies, only six patients have been admitted, three have 
died, and one was removed by his parents, leaving 148 inmates in residence at this time. 
Of that number, 74 are males and 74 females. 

The occupation of the female servants' dormitory for a girls' sitting-room, as directed 
in my last minutes, has greatly added to- the comfort and quietness of the female side of 
the house, as well as to the better classification of the inmates. This arrangement and 
the excellent natural ventilation of the dormitories, will admit of at least six more inmates 
being accommodated, without doing any violence to the sanitary precautions against over- 
crowding. Six idiots therefore must at once be selected from among the most urgent 
cases in the Common Gaols and removed to the Asylum. 

The condition of the inmates, as regards clothing and personal cleanliness, is, consider- 
ing the difiiculty attending the accomplishment of this object, very creditable, and there 
is evidence that they are all kindly treated and their wants cartifully looked after. 

Two girls were under slight meclianical restraint, o-wing to destructive habits. I am 
of opinion that the ordinary leather muff" would be the best method of restraint in such 
cases. The Medical Superintendent is authorized to order half a dozen. 

The health of the Asylum has been wonderfully good during the past six months, as 

47 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



indicated by the fact that only three deaths have occurred in that period, and during 
my inspection, only one of the inmates was confined to bed in the day time. 

Tlie various tables were visited when dinner was served. The food was good and 
sufficient in supply. The good behaviour of the inmates during meals was very marked 
and indicated careful training. 

The wards, sitting-rooms, bath-rooms and closets are all found in an exceedingly clean 
and well-kept state, and the beds are comfortable, clean and tidy-looking. The kitchen 
and laundry are also well and neatly kept. The Medical Superintendent will be good 
enough to arrange to have the ceilings all well lime-washed this spring, and the places 
where the plastering has fallen off, must be repaired. 

In order that the old fence may be taken down and re-constructed at the proper 
places and the necessary repairs be carried on at the same time, the Superintendent is 
authorized to engage the services of a carpenter for three months, and the Bursar is 
authorized co place such person's name on the pay list during that time. 

The Medical Superintendent is authorized to expend $50 in planting trees along the 
road leading through the Asylum property. 

At this visit an investigation has been held into the causes of certain antagonism and 
ill-feeling existing between some officers of the Asylum. The evidence, taken under oath, 
with my remarks thereupon, will be specially reported for the consideration of His 
Honour, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council. 

Accompanied by the Provincial Treasurer, I again inspected this Asylum on the ITth 
June. 

The changes in the population since my previous quarterly visit, on the 19th March, are 
shewn in the following summary : Remaining in the Asylum on that day, 148 ; admitted 
since, 9 ; died, 5 ; thus leaving 1.52 inmates in the Asylum at this ^-isit. Only 2 males and 
2 females are confined to bed ; with these exceptions, the health of the inmates is 
remarkably good. There are 4 cases of mild restraint on the female side of the house, 
which appeared to be necessar}'. 

The halls and rooms have been lightened in appearance by calcomining. The fencing 
off' and levelling of the female airing yard has greatly improved the means of giving airing 
and exercise to the female patients. It would be well to surround the large trees with 
rough fixed seats. 

It is observed that the outlet of the drain is below the water in the bay, causing com- 
plete stagnation in the sewer, and, although not yet perceptable, possibly foul air in the 
Asylum. The high water is, of course, the cause of this, and it is difficult, if not impossible, 
to remedy the trouble, but as soon as the water falls, the Medical Superintendent will see 
that all the drains are thoroughly flushed and aired. 

The condition of the airing verandahs in the front of the Asylum is rather dangerous 
from rotting timbers. The Public Works Department will be advised of the defect, with 
a view to these verandahs being reconstructed. 

As the fences round the newly-acquired land are about completed and the filling in 
of the water-lot is nearly done, it is desirable that the new road to the Asylum should be 
made as soon as possible. As the road now laid out and planted will neither shew the 
grounds nor buildings to advantage, a new alignment has been decided upon and staked 
out at this visit, which the Superintendent will follow in constructing the avenue. He is 
authorized to spend §50 in gravelling, after the bed is laid with boulders and broken 
stones. 

f*^ Mrs. Duke having resigned the position of Matron, Miss Elliott, the Matron of the In- 
stitution for the Blind, will be transferred to the post and will be instructed to report on 
the 2nd July. She will have the same salary, pi-ivileges and perquisites as the retiring 
Matron. 

The space in this Asylum being entirely filled, and as an addition cannot be made to 
it until an appropriation be voted by Parliament, I, in view of the urgency of many cases 
of idiocy awaiting admission, made a report of these facts to tb 'i Government and recom- 
mended that an Order in Council pass, authorizing the reception of idiots into two of the 
wards in the recently opened additions to the Hamilton Asylum. This recommendation 
having been approved of, the Medical Superintendent is requested to forward to me all ap- 

48 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



plications for admission which he has in his possession, and to report the degree of ur- 
gency in each case. 

I made a third inspection of the Orillia Asylum on the 23rd August, of which the 
following is a record : — 

This visit is made chiefly for the purpose of checking the Register Roll. In performing 
this duty I have necessarily seen every inmate of the Asylum, the population of which 
numbers 154 (76 males and 78 females). Owing to the opening of two wards for idiots 
in the Hamilton Asylum, and the absence of vacancies in this institution, only 5 admis- 
sions have been awarded since my last visit on the 1 7th June. Three deaths have taken 
place during the same period. These comprise all the changes in the population since the 
date named. The condition of the inmates is, upon the whole, satisliactory. In the 
rear ward for males, whei-e a good many of the inmates are physically helpless, there are, 
of course, exceptions to these conditions, but taking everything into account, I have 
a good report to make of the state of the inmates. Only 2 of ihem are in bed, 1 on 
the male and 1 on the female side of the house. Mechanical restraint is conhned to 5 
persons, 1 woman in leather mutfs, 1 in straight jacket of a loose pattern, 1 locked up in 
a single room, and 2 males in straight jackets. Destructive habits are the chief cause 
of restraint. 

The various wards, rooms and offices of the Asylum are found in a well-kept and clean 
state. The air at some points is rather vitiated, chiefly in the lower female closet. Dis- 
infectants might be used to advantage. 

The store-rooms in the round house are kept in a very slovenly state. The Bursar will 
see that the utmost neatness and order are introduced. 

Plaster is falhng ofl" the ceilings in some of the dormitaries and is a source of 
danger to the patients. The Medical Superintendent will be good enough to fui'nish me 
with the superticial area of the rooms where the plaster is the worst, m order that an 
estimate may be made of what it will cost to substitute thin matched boards. 

The grounds are still being improved and a good deal of fencing has been done by the 
Asylum carpenter. It is desirable that the front grounds of the Asylum should be com- 
pleted so far as road making, hlling in, sowing ^vith gi-ass seed and sodding the boixlers, 
are concerned. The Medical Superintendent is authorized to expend $150 on maintenance 
account, in order that the work may be at once completed. 



The following tables connected with the operations of the various Asylums ai-e here- 
to annexed, viz. : — 

Table No. 1, shewing the general movements of patients in respect to admissions, 
dischariCes, deaths, and transfers, together with the number in residence at the beyinnins; 
and ending of the year, etc. ^ 

Table No. 2, shewing the counties from which patients were admitted to Asylums 
dui'iug the year, and the Asylums they were assigned to. 

Table No. 3, shewing the counties and places from which the entire number of patients 
that have been admitted to Asylums were received. 

Table No. 4, shewing the lengtji of time the patients, received into the Asylums during 
the year, had been insane prior to the time of admission. 

Table No. 5, shewing length of residence of patients remaining in the Asylums on 
the 30th September, 1879. 

Table No. 6, shewing the periods that patients were under treatment who were dis- 
charged cured during the year. 

Table No. 7, shewing the period that patients were under treatment who were discharged 
improved during the year. 

Table No. 8, shewing the periods that patients were under treatment who were dis- 
charged unimproved during the year. 

Table No. 9, shewing the length of Asylum I'esidence of those patients who died dur- 
ing the year endiug 30th September, 1879. 

4 49 



43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



Table No. 1 0, shewing the causes of death of those patients who died during the year 
ending 30th September, 1879. 

Table No. 11, shelving the trades, callings, and occupations of the persons admitted to 
the various Asylums during the year ending 30th Septembei", 1879, and the total admissions. 

Table No. 12, shewing the causes of insanity of the persons admitted to the various 
Asylums during the year ending 30th September, 1879. 

Table No. 13, shewing detailed expenditure of the various Asylums of the Province 
for the year ending 30th September, 1879. 

Table No. 14, statement shewing in detail the amount expended for the various 
branches of the Asylum service, and the cost per jjatient for maintenance for the year 
ending 30th September, 1879. 

Table No. 15, shewing the supplies for which tenders were invited and the prices 
paid for the same under contract. 

Table No. 16, shewing the number of officers and employes in each and all of the 
Asylums, classilied according to duties performed. 

Table No. 1 7, shewing the nature of employment and the number of days work per- 
formed by patients during the year. 



»0 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 





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51 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (>^o. 8.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE No. 2. 

Shewing the Counties from which Patients were admitted to Asylums during the 
year, and the Asylums they were assigned to. 



Name of County oi- Place from which insane 
persons were sent to Asylums, for the year 
ending the 30th September, 1879. 






as 



po 



Brant . . . 
Bruce . . 
Carleton 
Elgin . . . 
Essex . . . 



Frontenac . 

drey 

Haldimand 

Halton 

Hastings . . . 

Huron 

Kent 



Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds and Grenville 

Lennox and Addington 

Linco.n 

MidiUesex 

Norfolk 

Noi-thumherland and Durham .... 

Ontario . 

Oxford 

Peel 

Pertli 

Peterborough 

Prescott and Kussell 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew , 

Simcoe . 

Storaiont, Dundas, and Glengarrj" 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wentworth 

York 

District of Algoma 

Kingston Penitentiary 



Total . 



4 

3 

10 

1 

6 

11 

1 



6 
7 
^ 
8 

10 
6 
2 

11 
4 
5 
6 
4 
7 
6 
3 
2 
4 
2 

15 
7 
8 

10 
7 
1 
8 

51 
1 
1 



251 






S"* 



?,s 






10 
5 
3 
6 
7 
5 
4 
5 
6 
5 
12 
12 
3 

"3 
2 

6 
24 

3 
14 

8 
11 

4 



10 

2 

3 

2 

5 

12 

18 

37 

1 



264 



4) J 








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c 


C.S 










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p 




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14 

8 
13 

9 

^ i 
11 ' 

15 i 

6 
11 

5 
18 
19 

8 

8 
13 

8 

8 
35 

7 
19 
14 
15 
11 
13 

6 

2 
10 

2 
25 

9 
11 
12 
12 
13 
26 
88 

2 

1 



2 
3 
3 
6 
40 
1 



11 

18 

S 

1 



32 
2 
1 
2 

14 
1 

12 
1 



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s 


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58 



3 

10 

5 



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1 
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3 
4 
6 
5 

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1 
1 
1 
1 

17 
3 

'5' 

4 

8 

20 

36 



1(54 



23 



* Included in the above admissions, are four transfers from Toronto Asylum to other Asylums in th« 
Province. 



52 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE No. 3. 

Shewine: the CouDties and places from which the entire number of Patients that 
have been admitted to Asylums were received. 



NAME OF COUNTY. 


Admissions of 
past year. 


Total admissions 
of present and 
anterior years, 
less transfers. 


Brant . 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Elgin 

Essex 


14 

8 

13 

9 

8 

11 

15 

6 

11 

5 

18 

19 

8 

8 

13 

8 

8 

35 

7 

19 

14 

15 

11 

13 

6 

2 

10 

2 

25 

9 

11 

12 

12 

13 

26 

88 

2 

1 










161 
98 
206 
146 
116 
319 


Grey 


154 


Haldimand . 


100 
144 




159 


Huron ." 

Kent 

Lambton , 

Lanark .... 


214 
138 
175 
111 




162 


Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln 


89 
209 


Middlesex 

Norfolk 


441 
101 




424 


Ontario 

Oxford 


237 
175 


Peel 

Perth 


192 
179 


Peterborough ... 

Prescott and Russell 


122 
47 


Prince Edward , 


71 
75 


Simcoe 

Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland , 

Wellington , 


267 
196 
96 
130 
102 
2fi2 
468 


Vork 


1642 


l>istrict of Algoma 

Kingston Penetentiary 

Manitoba 

Quebec 


10 

43 

1 

9 

8 


Foreigners and unassignable 


125 




515 


8124 



63 



43 Victoria 



Sessional Papers (No. 8./ 



A. 1880 



TABLE No. 4. 

Shewing the length of time the patients, received into the Asylum duiing the 
year, had been insane prior to the time of admission. 



DURATION OF INSANITY BEFORE ADMISSION. 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Under 1 month 

From 1 to 2 months 
do 2 to 3 do 

3 to 4 

4to 5 

.'ito 6 

6to 7 

7to 8 

8to 9 

9 to 10 
do 10 to 11 
do 11 to 12 
do 12 to 18 
do 18 months to 2 years 
do 2 to 3 years 

3 to 4 do 

4 to .0 do 

5 to 6 do .... 

6 to 7 do 

7tf> 8 do 

8 to 9 do 

9 to 10 do 

do 10 to 1.9 do 

do 1.5 to 20 do 

do 20 years upwarrls . . . 

Unknown 

Idiots 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 




54 



43 Yictoria. 



Sessional P:ip:rs (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE No. .5. 

(Shewing the lei-^^th oi' residence of patients remaining in the Asylums on 
the 30th September, 1879. 



LENGTH OF RESIDENCE. 



under 2 years 

From 2 to 5 years 
do 5 to 10 do 
do 10 to 15 do 
do 1.5 to 20 do 
do 20 to 2.5 do 
do 2o upwards . . 



W 



i^ 
















1 =^ 


s 


< 


^ 
T. 


c 


<?; 






-^ 


03 


^ 


^ 






eS 




w 


o 



150 


210 


93 


144 


44 


641 


230 


135 


89 


19 


75 


548 


122 


166 


122 


80 


31 


521 


57 


31 


85 


39 


3 


215 


65 


86 


22 


31 


1 


205 


31 


43 


12 


'.) 


1 


96 


19 


71 




9 




99 


674 


742 


423 


331 


155 


232.5, 



65 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE No. e>. 

Shewing the periods that patients were under treatment, who were discharged 

cured during the year. 



PERIODS UNDER TREATMENT. 



^ 



do 
do 



Under 1 month 

From 1 to 2 months . 

do 2 to 3 do 

do 3 to 4 do 

do 4 to 5 do 

do 5 to 6 do 

do 6 to 7 do 

do 7 to 8 do , 

do 8 to 9 do . 

do 9 to 10 

do 10 to 11 

do 11 tol2 do 

do 12 to 18 do 

do 18 months to 2 years , 

do 2 to 3 years 

do 3 to 4 do , , , 

do 4 to do 

do 5 to 6 do 

do 6 to 17 do 

do 7 to 8 do 

do 8 to 9 do 

do 9 to 10 do 

do 10 to 15 do 

do 15 to 20 do . . 

do 20 years and over 



34 



2 
.5 
7 
8 


:i 
7 
3 
6 
3 



64 



1 


3 


2 


3 


1 


3 


2 


1 


1 




3 


1 



25 



12 



56 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 18R0 



TABLE No. 7. 



Shewing the periods that patients were under tieatmeui, who were discharged 

improved during the year. 



PERIODS UNDER TREAT:iIENT. 


3 

< 
o 

2 

o 
H 


a 
o 


g 
3 
'>. 

-3 

1 

.1 

'4 


i, 

< 

a 
3 


■i 

o 




2 


1 




.... 


2 


From 1 to 2 months 


1 


do 2 to 3 do 


2 


1 




.... 


3 


do 3 to 4 do 


5 


1 






6 


do 4 to 5 do 


.... 










do 5 to 6 do 




1 






1 


do • 6 to 7 do . , 


4 




1 





5 


do 7 to 8 do 


2 

1 


3 

1 






5 


do 8 to 9 do 


2 


do 9 to 10 do 












do 10 to ] 1 do 


2 
1 








2 


do 11 to 12 do 


1 


do 12 to 18 do 


4 


5 


1 


1 


10 


do 18 months to 2 years , 


1 




3 


1 


1 




5 




1 


2 






3 




27 


16 


3 


1 


47 



57 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (]S3o. 8.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE No. 8. 

Shewing the periods that, patients were under treatment, who were discharged 

nnimj)roved during the year. 



PERIODS UNDEE TREATMENT. 


S 

1 

s 

i 

o 


6 

§ 
'a 

o 


Kingston Asylum. 


1 

< 
o 
"S 


S 

.5 
O 


1 

1 


Under 1 month , . 




3 

1 

1 


1 






,3 


From 1 to 2 m(mths 

do 2 to 3 do 


2 


.... 1 .... 

1 j .... 


2 
2 


do 3 to 4 do 




... ! 1- 2 


do 4 to .5 do 


1 




1 ^ ! 
1 
.... 1 .- - 1 1 


do ,5 to fi do 

do 6 to 7 do 

do 7 to 8 do 




1 


1 

1 


.... 1 

1 i 1 

1 


do 8 to 9 do 

do 9 to 10 do 


1 


1 2 

.... 1 -..- 


do 10 to 11 do 

do 11 to 12 do 


1 






1 
1 


do 12 to 18 do . 

do 18 months to 2 years 


2 


1 

1 


. .. 4 
.... 1 1 


do 2 to 3 years 


2 


.... 1 3 




! 




9 8 


2 


3 2 
1 


24 



58 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE N'.. u. 

Shewing tho length o-" A'^yluni residence of those Patiei.u. who died duimg th^ 
year ending 30th September, 1870. 



PERIODS. 



Under 1 month 

Under 3 months 

Under 6 months 

Under 9 months 

Under 1 year .■ . . 

From 1 to 2 years 

From 2 to 3 years 

From 3 to 4 ygars . '. 5 

From 4 to 5 years 

From 5 to 6 years 

From 6 to 7 years 

From 7 to 8 years ' 1 

From 8 to 9 years 

From 9 to 10 years . 

From 10 to 15 years , 

From 15 to 20 years • . 

From 20 to 25 years , 




59 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. IbSO 



TABLE No. 10. 

Shewing the Causes of Death of those Patients who died during the year ending 

30th September, 1879. 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



Senile Decay 

General Paresis 

Diarrhoea . . . . . 

General Exhaustion . . 

Paralysis 

Latent Phthisis 

Ascites . . 

Pluro-pneumonia 

Phthisis . . . 

Exhaustion of ^lania . . 
Suicide by Hanging . . . 

Heart Disease 

Acute Mania 

Softening of Brain . . . , 

Marassmus 

Epilepsy 

Apoplexy 

Nervous Asthenia 

Acute Melancholia . . . . 

Dysentery 

Congestion of Brain . . 
Senile Exhaustion 
Gangrene of Lungs . . . 

Gangrene of Leg 

Pyaemia 

Erysipelas 

Intestinal Obstniction 
Icterus . . 



General Debility . . . 

Consumption 

Bilious Fever 

Cholera Morbus . , . 

Peritonitis 

Cardiac Disease 

Chronic Laryngitis 
Old Age 



30 



. 
























< 




o 


< 






'a 


.2 


c3 


O 



43 



23 



15 



13 



9 
11 
12 
6 
1 
3 
1 
3 
21 
4 
1 
4 
4 
1 
8 
7 
3 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

124 



60 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. b.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE No. 11. 



SheAving the Trades, Callings and Occcupations of the persons admitted to the 
\arious Asylums during the year ending yOth September, 1879, and the 
total admissions. 



TRADES, CALLINGS AND OCCUPATIONS. 


Admissions of 
present year. 


Total 
Admissions. 


Agents 

Book-keepers 


i" 1 

3' 

1 

1 ! 



""i" 

""1" 

2" 

10 

8 
4 

'"124 ' 

i" 

83" 

4 

2 
1 

i" 

9 

■■■■57" 


2 
16 


Bakers 


15 


Bricklayer.s 

Butchers . . . | 

Blacksmiths . . | 


7 
17 
t)6 


Brass-finisher 

Brewers 

Builders 


1 

12 

1 


Barbers 

Broonimakers 


5 
1 


Barristers 

Bookbinders 


3 

2 


Brickmakers 


2 


Bridge-tenderers ... 


1 




1 


Commercial travellers . ... 


6 


Cabinetmakers 


5 


Consul (U.S. ) 

Confectioners 


1 
3 


Coopers 

Carpenters 


24 

189 


Clerks 


145 




25 


Carriagemakers. 


4 


Cooks 


8 
5 


Captains of Steamboats 


2 
5 


Custom-House Officer 


1 




1 


Dyers 


1 

1765 


Dressmakers 


19 


Druggists 


1 
10 
22 


Editors 


1 


Fishermen 


1404 
4 


Ferrymen 

Gardeners , 


1 

2 

1 

12 




i 


Glassblower 


1 


Glovemakers 


20 

1 1 




1 


Hatters 


2 
2 


Hunters 

Housekeepers 

Ironmongers ... 

J anitors 


2 

14 

311 

1 

1 

1 8 
1 1 




1 1248 


Laundresses 


! I 


Carried forward 


315 


5440 



61 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



Shewing the Trad 
variou 



le Trades, Callings and Occupations of the persons admitted 
;S Asylums, etc. — Continued. 



to the 



TRADES, CALLINGS AND OCCUPATIONS. 



Admissions of 
present year. 



Brought forward 



Ladies 

Lawyers 

Lumbermen . . , 
Milliners .. 

Masons 

Machinists . . . 
Matchmakers. . 
Millers ... 

Moulders 

Merchants 

Mechanics . . . 
Musicteachers 
Nightwatches . 
Nurses ..... 



Officers . . . . 
Organbuiklers 
Plasterers . . . . 
Pensioners ... . 
Photographers 
Prostitutes . . . 

Painter.'! 

Printers 

Peddlers . ... 



Physicians 

Pump-makers .... 

Professors of music 

Kailway Foreman 

Pailway Conductors 

Sailors 

Students 

Spinners 

Sisters of Charity 

Soda-water manufacturer 

Stone-cutters 

Showmen . ... . . . . 

Saddlers .... 

Shoemakers 

Seamstresses 

Soapmaker 

Slaters • 

Station-masters 

Soldiers 

Salesmen 

Surveyors 

Sail and Tent makers 

Shopkeepers 

Ship-builders 

Teachers 

Tinsmiths 

Tavern-keepers 

Tailors 

Tanners 

Teamsters 



Toll-gate keepers 

Watchmakers 

Woodworkers 

Weavers • • 

Wheehvrights 

Waggon- workeis 

Unknown, or other employment . 



315 
3 

' i' 
i' 

3 

i 
"4' 



12 

1 



Total. 



2 
143 



515 



Total 
Admissions. 



5440 

15 

15 

1 

25 

59 

26 

1 

32 

20 

101 

36 

1 

1 

4 

1 

1 

1 

4 

6 

4 

42 

34 

13 

19 

1 

10 

1 

1 

40 

24 

2 

1 

1 

3 

2 

4 

124 

123 

1 

1 

3 

16 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

135 

16 

13 

86 

5 

4 

1 

7 

2 

10 

1 

1574 

8124 



62 



18 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



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43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE No. 13. 

Shewing detailed Expenditure of the various Asylums of the Province, for the 
year ending 30th September, 1879. 



DETAILS. 



Medicines , 

Medical Comforts and Appliances 

Beer, Wine and Spirits 

Butcher's Meat 

Fowls, Fish, Game, &c 

Milk 

Flour, Bread, &c 

Butter 

Barley, Rice, Peas and Meal 

Tea 

Coffee 

Cheese 

Eggs 

Fruit (dried) 

Tobacco and Pipes 

Salt, Pepper, Mustard, Vinegar and 

Pickles 

Syrup and Sugar 

Unenumerated Groceries 

Fruit and Vegetables 

Bedding 

Straw for Bedding 

Clothing 

Shoes . . . . 

Coal 

Wood 

Gas 

Oil and Candles 

Matches 

Brushes, Brooms and Mops 

Bathbricks, Blacklead and Blacking . , . . 

Soap and Laundry Expenses , . 

Water supply 

Advertising and Printing 

Postage, Telegraphing and Express 

Stationery and Library 

Furniture, renewal and repairs 

Iron and Tinware 

Crockery and Glassware 

Feed and Fodder 

Farm, Labour, Stock and Implements, 

including repairs to same 

Repairs, Ordinary, to Buildings, &c 

Do Extraordinary 

Hardware, &c 

Paints and Oils 

Law Expenses 

Ice 

Officers' Travelling Expenses 

Elopers, recovering 

Freight and Duties 

Amusements 

Religious Instruction 

Interments 

Rent 

Incidentals 

Salaries and Wages 



Toronto 
Asylum. 



London 
Asylum. 



$ cts. 
397 37 
111 05 

1,453 66 
10,249 63 

1,055 16 

'6^587 45 
3,149 12 
984 39 
2,892 23 
431 90 
120 93 
403 37 
328 27 
702 98 

151 45 

2,955 42 

327 61 

1,845 69 

3,121 80 

40 92 

3,596 78 

271 59 

4,537 32 

1,047 40 

1,891 15 

77 45 

8 75 

169 27 

32 50 

738 11 

1,542 17 

387 78 

181 42 

536 01 

1,296 22 

379 82 

236 65 

120 77 

689 01 

2,015 27 

421 62 

433 28 

1,232 36 

""99'6o 
11 55 

" ii4"92 

157 75 

""65 00 

"'383'87 
23,739 97 



$ cts. 
745 20 
41 .53 
145 42 
11,350 47 
689 30 

'7^242 '59 

2,392 63 

702 06 

1,172 05 

1,198 87 

96 30 

280 44 

614 66 

735 54 

209 61 
3,388 77 

287 79 
1,935 84 
3,127 57 

411 71 
6,124 75 

582 15 
7,225 51 
3,122 08 
2,610 70 

241 83 
41 00 

216 97 

41 00 

1,307 31 



Kingston 
Asylum. 



149 60 

320 20 

690 94 

1,148 85 

474 43 

419 37 

1,301 89 

1,437 79 
2,197 15 

"747'86 

368 47 

73 81 

14 50 

45 60 

79 52 

166 72 

274 94 

81 40'51 

330 00 

35 50 

401 09 

26,640 46 



83,725 22 95,681 74 51,345 85 



$ cts. 

298 00 

46 75 



6,546 79 

360 76 

1,081 85 

4,073 59 

1,852 99 

383 67 

779 67 

231 04 

131 54 

75 43 

125 10 

22 40 

120 80 

1,357 23 

39 82 

1,591 29 

664 06 

272 11 
1,602 88 

541 99 
6,298 54 

333 49 

"i63'43 

7 15 

163 53 

12 62 

606 75 

"'ii4'56 
105 29 
304 05 
260 43 
9 00 
215 05 
556 86 

388 95 
600 19 

"65712 
245 95 

""i2 00 

153 05 

17 85 

32 00 

27 90 

""49 00 

"'938*79 
16,872 54 



Hamilton 
Asylum. 



Orillia 
Asylum. 



$ cts, 

161 97 

6 13 

120 24 

2,862 75 

195 93 
523 33 

2,717 16 
1,098 01 
550 32 
497 42 
119 71 
204 83 
50 13 
320 11 
227 85 

97 25 
934 40 

"662' 76 
47 97 
34 03 

1,802 67 
401 77 

7,008 87* 
206 38 

1,096 36 
14 25 
26 48 

196 68 
6 50 

531 18 
375 00 
253 62 

62 86 
135 00 

89 86 
206 15 

57 18 
520 93 

314 53 

488 74 

"185 "34 
366 25 

""2020 

87 00 

4 82 

"il9'54 
10 00 
76 00 

i 60 

11,088 96 



37,186 42 



$ cts. 

64 90 

6 85 

5 50 

1,785 22 

104 16 

49 00 
1,247 86 

600 25 
285 14 
333-56 

34 00 
23 93 

51 69 

8 53 
31 02 

50 57 
623 28 

42 02 
779 77 
156 14 

75 85 
983 63 

19 70 

"760 00 
237 62 

35 77 

9 50 

52 93 
3 20 

386 08 



77 96 
51 39 
31 93 

288 28 
12 60 
35 00 

375 21 

42 21 
369 87 



47 18 
30 38 



24 75 
28 65 



139 19 

18 97 



64 50 

190 00 

108 48 

8,170 92 



18,955 14 



Coal in for 1878 and 1879. 

65 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8. 



A. 1880 






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A. 1880 



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Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



TABLE No. 16. 

Shewing the number of Officers and Employes in each and all of the Asylums, 
classified according to duties performed. 



OCCUPATION. 



Medical Siipei'intendents , 

Assistant iledical Superintendents 

Assistant Medical Officers 

Bursars and Clerks 

Storekeepers 

Stewards 

Matrons 

Assistant Matrons 

Engineers, Assistant Engineers, and Stokers 

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Carpenters 

Bakers and Bakers' Assistants 

Gardeners and Assistant Gardeners 

Farmers, Farm-hands and Labourers . 

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Stable and Stock-keepers . 

Butchers and Jobbers 

Messengers and Porters 

Cooks - , 

Laundresses and Assistants 

Housemaids 

Kitchen Maids 

Dining-room Maids 

Dairymaids 



AtteTidants. I 

Chief Male Attendants i 7 

Chief Female Attendants ' 6 

Ordinary Male Attendants 17 

Ordinar J' Female Attendants ' 17 

Male Xight Watchers . 3 

Female Night Watchers i 3 




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Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 













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43 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 8.) A. 1880 



PAET 11. 



PEISONS, COMMON GAOLS AND REFORMATORIES. 



COMMON GAOLS. 

There were committed to the Common Gaols of the Province, during the year 
ending 30th September, 1879, 9,411 males and 1,809 females, or a total of 11,220 
prisoners, as compared with 12,030 in the preceding twelve months. 

The following summaries shew the number of commitments for the past three 
years, respectively : 

Males. Females. Total. 

Commitments for the year ending 30th 

September, 1878 10,017 2,013 12,030 

Commitments for the year ending 30th 

September, 1879 9,411 1,809 11,220 

Decrease in the number of commitments 
in the past as compared with the pre- 
ceding year 606 204 810 

Commitments for the year ending 30th 

September, 1877 11,595 1,886 13,481 

Commitments for the year ending 30th 

September, 1879 ' 9,411 1,809 11,220 



Decrease in number of commitments of 

past year as compared -^dth 1877. . . . 2,184 77 2,261 



From the foregoing figures, it will be seen that in the past as compared with 
the preceding year, there has been a decrease of 810, or 6.73 per cent., in the num- 
ber of persons committed to the Common Gauls, while a comparison with the 
number of committals in the year ending 30th September, 1877, shews the very 
large decrease of 2,261, or no less than 16.77 per cent, in the gaol population of 
the province since 1877. 

Table No. 1, attached to this portion of the Report, exhibits in detail the com- 
mitments to each Gaol in the past and preceding years, and the relative increase 
or decrease in the respective populations. 

It will be observed that the largest reductions in the number of commitments 
have taken place in the Gaols in Sarnia, Hamilton, London, WeUand and Wood- 

70 



43 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 8.) 



A. 1880 



stock. The only Gaol where a marked increase took place was Milton, where the 
commitments increased from 44 in 1877-78, to 341 in the past year. This Gaol 
was literally swarming with tramps and vagrants during the whole of the winter, 

A rather remarkable feature in the statistics for the year under report, and, to 
a certain extent, in those of the preceding twelve months, is the continued decrease 
in the commitments to city gaols. In 1877, the commitments to the Toronto 
Gaol numbered 3,117, as compared with 2,660 last year; to Brantford, 618 in 
1877 against 318 in 1879 ; to Ottawa, 842 against 691 ; to Hamilton, 1,186 against 
1,036 ; to St. Catharines, 238 against 131 ; to Belleville, 219 against 168; to Kings- 
ton, 310 against 265 ; and to London, 862 in 1878 against 727 in 1879. 

It is also worthy of notice that while the decrease in the commitment of 
males during the past two years has been very marked, the female gaol population 
has remained about the same ; as indeed it has done during the past ten years, as 
the following summary will shew : 



Commitments for year ending 30th Sep., 1869. 

1870. 
1871. 
1872. 



Males. 

.3,893 
.4,534 
.4,915 

.5,287 



1873.. 6,068 
1874.. 7,675 
1875.. 8,437 
1876 . . 9,439 
1877..11,595 
1878..10,017 
1879.. 9,411 



Females. 

1,762 
1,845 
1,700 
1,671 
1,809 
1,813 
1,636 
1,797 
1,886 
2,013 
1,809 



Total. 

5,655 

6,379 

6,615 

6,958 

7,877 

9,488 

10,073 

11,236 

13,481 

12,030 

11,220 



Table No. 2 shews, in respect of each Gaol and as a whole, the number of 
persons — male and female — under sixteen years of age, who were committed dur- 
ing the year, also the number of re-commitments of all classes, as well as the num- 
ber committed for want of sureties to keep the peace, as witnesses, debtors, luna- 
tics and persons of unsound mind, and the number of persons detained under civil 
process. It further shews the number of persons acquitted on being tried, the 
number discharged before trial, and the number convicted and sentenced. It is 
satisfactory to observe that there is again a considerable reduction in the number 
of committals of youths under sixteen years of age. For the year ending 30th 
September, 1877, the commitments of this class reached the highest point, viz., 
604. In the next year the number was reduced to 534, and during the year just 
passed, it was still further decreased to 469, of whom 416 were boys and 53 girls. 
Of the former, 58 were sentenced to the Provincial Reformatory. 

The commitments of boys and girls to the Common Gaols, unlike those of the 
women, varied numerically very much with the general increase in the gaol 
population up to 1877, but with the general decrease since that time, a reduction 
has also taken place in the number of yo